Hot answers tagged

60

Apparently not, according to this conversation between Qui-Gon Jinn and Shmi Skywalker where Qui-Gon states that Anakin was not born in the Republic (from the Episode I script) : SHMI: He deserves better than a slave's life. QUI-GON: Had he been born in the Republic, we would have identified him early. The Force is unusually strong with him, that ...


52

This one: It clearly is not Earth, since it has rings, and I do believe it appears (and is not just mentioned) in the credits sequence of every single Voyager episode. DS9 and TNG both have a few more episodes than VOY. However: TNG revamped their credits in season 3. The season 1/2 credits include shots of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn; the later-season ...


49

Bajor I'm going for Bajor, seen 16 times: "Chain of Command, Part I" - TNG "Birthright, Part I" - TNG "Emissary" - DS9 "The Circle" - DS9 "The Siege" - DS9 "Cardassians" - DS9 "The Collaborator" - DS9 "Past Tense, Part I" - DS9 "Shakaar" - DS9 "Rapture" - DS9 "The Reckoning" - DS9 "The Changing Face of Evil" - DS9 "What You Leave Behind" - DS9 "Maneuvers" -...


45

The first story is "Surface Tension" (see also the Wikipedia page) by James Blish, part of his Pantropy series, collected in a fix-up novel called The Seedling Stars. "Surface Tension" was first published in Galaxy Science Fiction, August 1952, available at the Internet Archive; click here for download options. (The story was also the subject of this old ...


41

According to Wikipedia, Earth is the only M Class-planet, because only it harbors and sustains natural life. That said, Mars could be considered Class L - easily terraformable into a habitable planet, assuming that Star Trek terraforming projects mentioned in canon exist. To wit, our solar system would be classified as follows: Mercury: Class D (...


41

I think it must be Cardassia Prime, which we see 18 times: twice in TNG episodes: "Chain of Command", part 1 "Chain of Command", part 2 and in sixteen times DS9 episodes: "Tribunal" "Second Skin" "Defiant" "Trials and Tribble-ations" "By Inferno's Light" "Tears of the Prophets" "Image in the Sand" "Shadows and Symbols" "Treachery, Faith and the Great ...


39

Assuming the opening scrawl is correct, I'd say that the single farthest Earth-like planet that we know of (from Coruscant) would be Earth.


39

Because of the Vulcans In Enterprise, they use a different name: Minshara-class. 1 I would assume that over time, this was shortened to just M. So that would explain why it's an M, which is smack-dab in the middle of the alphabet, and not at the beginning or end. Continuing to assume, we might assume that the other letters were decided after Minshara was ...


37

Within the Galaxy Far, Far Away, it appears - at least from this chart - that the planet furthest from Coruscant is the so-called "planet of the Red Nebula". To save you from having to search for the relevant planets:


37

There's never been any indications that ALL the planets in the Star Wars universe have breathable environments, survivable levels of gravity, etc. We see a lot of those kinds of planets because, well, otherwise our characters wouldn't be on those planets. But we do see gas giants like Yavin and Endor from space. There's also plenty of indication that there ...


27

I think the answer is simple: at the time Cooper was dropped off at Cooper station by the tesseract, Brand had only just arrived at Edmund's world, or was still making the trip there. I picked up the screenplay on Kindle, after Cooper and Brand did the gravitational slingshot around Gargantua to get Brand to Edmund's world Cooper said "That little maneuver ...


27

This is a well-known trope in science fiction, known as City Planet by TV Tropes1 and Ecumenopolis (meaning "city world") by Wikipedia. According to these sources, the first person to write about city planets was the preacher and spiritualist poet Thomas Lake Harris: way back in the 19th century, he wrote poetry about themes including interplanetary empires,...


26

Ryloth seems a pretty good fit. It has a wide range of 'biomes' seen in the canon Clone Wars series including some rugged mountain areas seemingly devoid of life as well as jungles. TERRAIN: Jungles, Mesas, Valleys, Volcanoes Star Wars Databank You might also consider Jaresh. It appears in the (canon) book Moving Target: A Princess Leia Adventure. ...


25

In-universe there appear to be a wide selection of planetary types (see below for a general list). They range from those that are deeply hostile to human life at one end of the spectrum to those that are more hospitable. No special reason is given in earlier sources regarding why M was chosen, other than that it's toward the end of the world types. TNG: ...


22

The short story is "Bordered in Black" by Larry Niven. From Wikipedia: A prototype faster-than-light spacecraft crewed by two men is sent to the Sirius system, known from robotic exploration to include an earthlike world. In orbit around the world, they notice that one of the continents has a thin, strange border all the way round its coastline, which ...


21

Vulcan Edit: Now that the movies don't count, this isn't the correct answer, but is still valid within the scope of the question! Possibly the planet Vulcan, seen 12 times: "Amok Time' - TOS 'Journey to Babel - TOS 'Yesteryear' - TAS 'Sarek' - TNG 'Unification I' TNG 'Gambit II' TNG 'Persistence of Vision' - VOY 'Gravity' - VOY 'Home' - ENT 'The Forge' -...


21

Out of universe, the designation of "Class M" was probably based on the real-life system of Stellar Classification, which describes stars. This system consists of a seemingly rather random set of classes - Classes O, B, A, F, G, K, and M. Our sun is a Class G2, meaning it's a hot main-sequence star between 5,300 and 6,000 kelvin. The system we currently use ...


20

I did a google search restricted to "site:chakoteya.net" (a site with transcripts of every Trek episode) along with searching for each planet, I found the following: Mercury: No scripts suggesting outposts on Mercury. Venus: In the Voyager episode "Future's End", Chakotay says that after he trained as a pilot in North America, "I went to Venus for a couple ...


18

1948: "Thang", a short short story (about one page) by Martin Gardner. According to Contento it was first published in the Fall 1948 issue of something called Comment. The earth had completed another turn about the sun, whirling slowly and silently as it always whirled. The East had experienced a record breaking crop of yellow rice and yellow children, ...


17

Hopefully someone can give a more detailed answer which matches up the characteristics of the planets to story elements, but just looking on the Planet Narnia website I see there are sub-pages for each planet which say which book the author believes was meant to be associated with it, and which list some of the qualities of that planet: Jupiter - The Lion, ...


17

What you are referring to is known as an ecumenopolis, which is a planet-spanning city. in Legends canon, there are a multitude of other examples of this, which include Nar Shaddaa and Taris, among numerous others. Of these, Nar Shaddaa, the moon of the Hutts' heavily polluted homeworld Nal Hutta, is probably the best known in the expanded universe, ...


17

That is most likely Arthur C. Clarke's The Fountains of Paradise. The engineer is Dr Vannevar Morgan, who wants to construct a space elevator, an elevator that stretches out into space. This elevator is made possible through the use of "hyperfilament", a monomolecular wire. The mountain is on Taprobane, or Sri Lanka. The mountain is home to a monastery, ...


16

Could you be describing Stargate SG1? It's a bit later than the 1980s (mid-1990s) but it fits the other criteria; interplanetary travel, new fuel source, "ancient egypt in space" concept;


16

In my opinion not all planets in the galaxy far far away are habitable, it's just that we are mostly shown planets that are. There wouldn't be much of a story if everyone on a planet were dead. Kel Dor's species have to wear masks since they breathe something other than oxygen (helium and Dorin gas). Gungans are an amphibious species so they are also ...


16

No. In the Star Wars: The Clone Wars movie, Palpatine says: The Hutts control the Outer Rim...and we'll need their space lanes in order to move our troops. The relationship between the 2 parties is written in galactic law by the Hutt-Republic treaty


15

The Machine Stops (1909) by E.M. Forster The Machine Stops at Wikisource By the same author that wrote A Passage to India, it also predicts the internet, instant messages, movies, and tablet computers. In this story, the whole earth is essentially one air-conditioned building.


15

Naboo I know that you disqualified Naboo already, but I think that you failed to consider that we know that Naboo has large marshy forests (where the jedi first met JarJar), and it also has large rolling plains (where the Gungans fought the droid army).


14

Isaac Asimov's Foundation series starts with the novelette "Foundation" in Astounding Science-Fiction, May 1942 (available at the Internet Archive), so that's the date to beat. No doubt that's the first notable work of science fiction, and probably the first readable one, to feature a city-planet, but you asked for the earliest one. I don't know if it's the ...


13

The film's Visual Dictionary identifies the red stuff under the salt as crystalline rhodochrosite, the entire reason for there to have been a mining base emplaced there in the first place. DESOLATE WORLD The Resistance fleet crawls at sublight speed towards this moonless, highly reflective planet. Crait's surface is covered in barren salt flats, ...


11

The combination of 80s and (Space) Egypt made me think of the TV series "Otherworld" Per Wikipedia; "References to Egyptian mythology abound, particularly in the signposts which the Sterlings use to attempt to find Imar; it was implied that the ancient Egyptians either had the ability to travel between universes, or had contact with a people that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible