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67

As I was typing the question, the answer came to my memory. Ents seemed to be pretty democratic (seemingly verging in anarchist in everyday life) - they had a council (Entmoot) where the decision on whether to go to war was being made. They had respected leaders but apparently no monarch making decisions - even Treebeard had to convince other Ents, despite ...


62

As late as 1980, the year of publication for Expanded Universe, a book of fiction and essays, Heinlein made no apology for Starship Troopers. He attacked the book's critics as largely being unable to adequately understand written English. Heinlein also made a case for increasing the requirements for the franchise in some fashion and offered some serious ...


61

There are several intertwined issues here. Human rights of the Pre-Cogs The Pre-Crime system depends in a crucial way on the constant participation of the Pre-Cogs, held in a (not necessarily pleasant) state that maximizes their perceptive abilities. While the film does not emphasize directly the issue of their rights, by the end it is clear that they ...


56

The Shire is pretty much a representative democracy (or maybe a constitutional semi-monarchy), insofar as it has any government at all. The prologue to The Lord of the Rings says: The Thain [an inherited office] was the master of the Shire-moot, and captain of the Shire-muster and the Hobbitry-in-arms, but as muster and moot were only held in times of ...


51

The tripod is truly the weakest political structure The balance of power in a political tripod is only stable as long as everyone wants to win and all players would rather prefer the status quo to a high risk game. In game theory this is the typical situation for board games with 3 players, where only one player will win the game. The two weaker players ...


48

The most obvious example in my view, and the only one that is mentioned in The Hobbit is the Master of Lake-Town (Esgaroth on the Long Lake). In the Laketown we have always elected masters from among the old and wise, and have not endured the rule of mere fighting men. The extended discussion of the Shire's local government does not come until the Lord ...


43

The Klingon Empire appears to have been intended to be a member of the Federation in TNG; however, in Season 3 the writers ret-conned that idea to allow them to be aggressors again. This is a screen capture from Season 1 showing a United Federation of Planets logo on a Klingon bridge. Other than this screen grab, and the conversation cited by the OP, it ...


40

Hitler's power derived from his ability to sway and inspire masses of people, which is legitimized through political office. Without his particular rhetorical skills and the discontented populace looking for someone to offer solutions, what was he? A failed painter. Voldemort, on the other hand, is an accomplished wizard, with very high marks on technical ...


40

You actually have the answer in your question. Three legs together are very stable, yes, and two sides will act to balance out the third. In Dune, there are three groupings that keep one side from taking all the power: The Emperor and the Landsraad keep the Guild from becoming too powerful The Landsraad and the Guild keep the Emperor from becoming too ...


36

My answer is isomorphic to that of @Himarm in some parts, but differs in others. My answer also begins with: The Klingon Empire appears to have been intended to be a member of the Federation in TNG timeline; however, in Season 3 the writers retconned that idea... But my answer differs on ...to allow them to be aggressors again. To be more precise, ...


31

It's a novel rather than a short story, but that sounds exactly like Beyond this Horizon by Robert Heinlein. The novel depicts a world where genetic selection for increased health, longevity, and intelligence has become so widespread that the unmodified 'control naturals' are a carefully managed and protected minority. Dueling and the carrying of arms is ...


30

The following is the political alignment of the regions in current timeline:                                                  &...


30

Elendil and Gil-galad named it as such. Had they not defeated Sauron, they would literally have been the last alliance. The Last Alliance of Elves and Men was indeed so great that it is noted to be only shadowed by the host of the Valar, which was assembled near the end of the First Age to overthrow Morgoth. Now Elendil and Gil-galad took counsel ...


28

Killing Hitler won't end World War II. There's way too many factors fueling World War II, and remember, up until about half way through, it looked very much like Nazi Germany was going to win big. The Nazi party had full governmental and ideological control of the country. The atrocities being committed here kept under wraps; most German citizens lived a ...


27

Tom Riddle wanted to bury his past. He couldn't do that in politics. Riddle is a pure-blood supremacist, and hates his family: He detests the Muggle family who gave him his name (and later tracks them down and kills them) He detects the magical mother who died giving birth to him, decrying her as weak: “My mother can’t have been magic, or she wouldn’t ...


26

It's Shield, not Sphere. The author is Poul Anderson. The cover image you describe brought it back immediately. Just in case there is more than one book with a "Cover illustration [that] showed a guy dressed like a bell-bottomed hippie hovering over a landscape inside a glass tube": Koskinen had returned to earth with a strange new "Shield" - a device ...


25

First of all, we are talking about Starship Troopers, the book, right? Too bad they never made a movie based on it. ;) The society depicted in Starship Troopers seems fascist only at the first glance: military seems to be in power, and corporal punishment is widely used. However, people only get citizenship and suffrage after their military service, and ...


25

It's very important that Cersei didn't only send Eddard to the Wall; she required him to publicly confess to treason. On the steps of the Great Sept, Eddard told the crowd that he had tried to seize the throne for himself, and Joffrey was the legitimate son of Cersei and King Robert. If Eddard had gone to the Wall as planned, but later spoken out against ...


23

Why not both? Winn is consciously designed as an enigmatic character, so it's difficult to get a read on exactly what she's really thinking. Watching the show, my impression was that she genuinely believed that she was acting in Bajor's best interests, and was willing to twist any evidence to prove that the Prophets were supporting her; of course, that's ...


22

It is just an historical reference. The most famous triumvirates are those of Rome (up to the point that you name them "First Triumvirate" and "Second Triumvirate", and everybody understands what are you talking about even if you do not add the "Roman" adjective): The First Triumvirate was between Julius Caesar, Pompey the Great and Marcus Licinus Crassus. ...


21

Your obvious negative opinion of Heinlein's ideas has led you into a false premise... The society of Starship Troopers isn't fascist, it's very clearly not a dictatorship. One of the points of the novel was to examine what a society might look like if voting was restricted by something other than age, but it's still a democratic society, not a totalitarian ...


21

It's not a story, but a short essay by Larry Niven, Yet Another Modest Proposal: The Roentgen Standard (the link is to Niven's own web site).


21

"Franchise" by Isaac Asimov, previously identified as the answer to this old question. (It was also posted as an answer, though not the accepted answer, to this other question.) From Wikipedia: In the future, the United States has converted to an "electronic democracy" where the computer Multivac selects a single person to answer a number of questions. ...


20

The Starfleet Technical Manual contains a complete copy of the "Articles of Federation" that were agreed by the original members of the United Federation of Planets on Stardate 0965. Although this book is generally considered 'non-canon', material from it has been used in several episodes of TNG, Trek films and throughout DS9 and Voyager. As you can see, ...


20

It is a little fuzzy what, if any, diplomatic channels were opened between the Federation and the Dominion prior to the outbreak of the war. If the Dominion never established exactly what was their territory (rather than perhaps generally claiming the entire quadrant), then the Federation may have felt justified continuing to explore. The few times that we ...


20

Because of the International Statute of Secrecy. Leaving aside the history of World War 2, intervention in Muggle affairs is strictly off-limits. The Statute of Secrecy forbade any disclosure of magic to Muggles, and had been in place for a good few years by the turn of the war. “Upon the signature of the International Statute of Secrecy in 1689, wizards ...


18

The Iron Islands were a part of the Kingdom of Isles and Rivers. Before the Targeryen invasion, House Hoare ruled over the Iron Islands and the Riverlands. House Hoare was the Royal House of the Iron Islands. Harwyn Hoare conquered the Riverlands and House Hoare controlled the Riverlands until Harwyn's grandson Black Harren was killed during the ...


17

I outsourced this question to the PrintSF Sub-Reddit, the user mage2k suggested The Short Ones by Raymond E Banks he read from the Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories 17 (1955) short story collection : I'm fairly certain I remember reading that in a short story collection when I was a kid, possibly edited by Asimiov, but I can't remember anything ...


17

Getting a Ministry job would've opened Voldemort to public scrutiny, something that could've easily sabotaged his schemes. Remember that while prejudice against Muggles isn't certainly rare in the Wizarding world, Voldemort is very extreme in his beliefs and would likely have trouble convincing people to follow him - especially with enemies such as ...


17

This is "The Snowball Effect" by Katherine Maclean (1952). A sociology professor, challenged to prove his theories of the dynamic growth of organizations, rewrites the rules of a smalltown sewing circle to have "more growth drive than the Roman Empire." He is far more successful than he ever anticipated. Originally in Galaxy Science Fiction (...


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