51

JKR pronounces it exactly as it's pronounced in the films and from the FAQ on JKR's old website (along with a handy guide for how to remember it) Q. How do you pronounce 'Hermione?' A. Her (as in 'her brain is bigger than everyone else's') + my (as in 'my brain isn't as big as that') + oh (as in 'oh, for a brain ...


46

This is addressed in the appendices: Tolkien, J. R. R. "Appendix E – Writing and Spelling: I. Pronunciation of Words and Names". The Lord of the Rings.: "All these diphthongs were 'falling' diphthongs, that is stressed on the first element, and composed of the simple vowels run together. Thus ... au (aw) as in loud, how and not laud, haw." I didn'...


39

In the Jonathan Davis-narrated audiobook, the consistent pronunciation is David ('deɪ-vɪd'). Obviously the choice of a l33t name (e.g. replacing one or more characters for a number) is intended to identify him to the reader as a hacker/cracker both in and out-of-universe. In this case, the letter v (which corresponds with the Roman numeral V) has been ...


34

Patrick Stewart crystallized the pronunciation during the first script reading I'm at the Star Trek 50th Anniversary Celebration in Las Vegas right now. Brent Spiner just revealed the answer to this on stage. He mentioned that he himself would have pronounced it "Daa-ta", but Patrick Stewart read it as "Mr. Day-ta" in the first script reading (in front of ...


31

"Therefore names such as Sauron or Smaug are pronounced like Sow-ron or sm-ow-g." According to the LOTR Wiki. Also this references Appendix E – Writing and Spelling: I. Pronunciation of Words and Names. I had always read it as sm-og until I heard the guys from MST3K / RiffTrax say it this other way. Then I looked it up.


30

The correct pronunciation of Sauron is /ˈsaʊrɒn/, as in "sour". This is specified in the pronunciation notes included in The Silmarillion, in the Note on Pronunciation section: "the first syllable of Sauron is like English sour, not sore" and in The Children of Hurin: "AU" has the value of English ow in town; thus the first vowel of Sauron is like ...


27

"At-At", according to LucasFilm. Joseph Lin, a journalist at Time Magazine, asked LucasFilm this very question. They responded that the official pronunciation rhymes with "hat-hat". http://techland.time.com/2010/09/02/how-do-you-pronounce-at-at/ As for the A-T-A-T pronunciation preferred by many fans, I can remember it being in common use as early as the ...


26

The second way. Thorin Oakenshield is not the second "Thorin Oakenshield". Oakenshield is a nickname which applies only to him and not to his ancestor Thorin I. So the correct way to render it is "Thorin the Second, Oakenshield." Or if you want a long-winded version that borrows from Game of Thrones, "Thorin, second of his name, called Oakenshield." For a ...


23

It's pronounced Van Vote In 1994, author Isaac Walwyn met Van Vogt at a science fiction book signing event. I've quoted him directly; It was also at this time that I learned how to pronounce his name: he was telling someone that the "G" in "Vogt" was silent, making it sound identical to "vote." But by and large he did very little talking. He seemed ...


23

Okay, I believe I found confirmation that the Ferengi pronunciation of "human" is meant as an insult, not a side-effect of their physiology. In DS9 4x08, Little Green Men, Quark pronounces "human" normally about halfway through the episode. Listen here: This clip occurs while their Universal Translators are damaged, so we'...


22

Disclaimer: I haven't read the books so this is just a guess. Since 5 is V in Roman numerals, I'm guessing "David".


20

I emailed Douglas Gresham two days ago and asked him which pronunciation was correct. I've heard two pronunciations of "Calormen/Calormene": "CA-lor-men/CA-lor-meen" (the one I grew up using/hearing) and "cuh-LOR-men" for both (the one Focus on the Family Radio Theatre uses). Could you let me know which pronunciation Jack Lewis intended and used? He ...


19

Both are correct According to Dave Filoni, producer of Star Wars Rebels and former director of the Clone Wars the answer is both. In an interview during Star Wars Celebration 2016 he says: I say you can say at-at, you can say A-T-A-T, and you can say walker. I'm for all three. ... That's canon because in the show I have Imperials say walkers, I have them ...


17

Patrick Rothfuss, the author of the Kingkiller Chronicles, says: Ask the Author #4: How Do I Pronounce Kvothe’s name? The initial “kv” sound in “Kvothe” doesn’t crop up in standard English that often. But it does appear in the Yiddish term “kvetch.” The “o” is the same as in “roll” or “hole.” The “e” is silent. If you’ve been ...


16

The french pronunciation of Beauxbatons is "Bo-ba-ton" with the ending sounding almost the same as the english word "bond" without pronuncing the "d" The standard pronunciation form is : /bɑ.tɔ̃/


16

A phonetic pronunciation of her name is given in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Ron says her name while his mouth is full of food, and it is rendered as four syllables. ‘Oh, c’mon, ’Er-my-knee,’ said Ron, accidentally spraying Harry with bits of Yorkshire pudding. ‘Oops – sorry, ’Arry –’ He swallowed. ‘You won’t get them sick leave by starving ...


13

Here's what westeros.org said about it: Aeron: — ['ɛəɹən] air-ən, like Aaron Damphair: GRRM & John Lee pronounce it as ['dæmphɛəɹ] damp-hair while Roy Dotrice pronounces it as ['dæmfɛəɹ] dam-fair Westeros.org said that in the below link GRRM pronounces Damphair damp-hair. Apparently it is said in this video, but I haven't watched it ...


12

I'm not a phonetician1, so this is going to be a very amateurish answer from a phonetics perspective. Different characters on the show typically used one of two pronunciations2: go-aah-oold, typically used by the System Lords, Tok'ra, Jaffa, and nerds like Daniel Jackson goo-ld, typically used by other military characters, like Jack O'Neill and General ...


12

It's pronounced as written. Ixian = "ick-see-ann" You can hear a clip of Frank Herbert reading from God Emperor of Dune to get a pronunciation guide In-universe, the inhabitants of Ix ("icks") largely aren't aware that the name of their planet derives from a small joke about the position of their planet in their solar ...


11

Just listen to Obi-Wan: Let's say it together now: "moss ice-zlee".


10

moss i-sszlee Visit Wookieepedia: Mos Eisley (pronounced /mɑs aɪzliː/, moss izelee, And here's a sound clip of the pronunciation, also from Wookieepedia. To me it sounds more like 'moss i-sszlee' As for how a native Tatooian pronounces it, listen to Watto which confirms it is 'moss i-sszleee'. Just for some background, the same Wookieepedia site ...


10

In the invented languages, "C" is always hard There's a note near the end of the first part of Appendix E which clarifies this: In names drawn from other languages than Eldarin the same values for the letters are intended, where not specially described above, except in the case of Dwarvish. Return of the King Appendix E "Writing and Spelling" I "...


9

The pronunciation of Tuvok corresponds to the way Spock is pronounced.


9

In audiobooks, Asshai is pronounced as ASH-eye or a-SHY, depending on the narrator's accent. In the HBO's show Game of Thrones, it is pronounced as uh-SHY. For your reference, you may check these pronunciation guides: A Wiki of Ice and Fire (Pronunciation Guide) Official Pronunciation Guide of Game of Thrones


8

Unlike Tolkien, George RR Martin doesn't provide elaborate pronunciation guides for his characters' names. So there may not be a fully canonical answer. That said, "aer" seems to represent a sound similar to the English word "air" -- so Aeron more or less sounds like "Air On". Damphair is a nickname referring to dousing with water as part of the worship ...


8

According to the author's website Sidheag ~ SHEE-ak alternatively pronounced SIDH-hey, just to make matters confusing. (Again, chosen for its meaning, all the pack names are.) The word itself means "Wolf" in Gaelic and is, apparently a traditional name in Scotland although it's never broken into the top 10,000 baby names in the last 100 years.


8

"Like the o in clock" is correct. Listen to how differently the British and American accents make it sound - the crew of Voyager have American accents, so make it sound like an "a" to those used to a British (or related) accent.


8

Your use of 'mate' suggests you speak a British- or British-descended English. I'll proceed on that assumption. Have a look at this list of Lexical Sets for UK and US English, in particular the LOT row. UK 'RP' (as that table calls it) uses /ɒ/ for this vowel sound; note that CLOCK is in the LOT set, so when you talk about " the “o” like the “o” in “clock”"...


8

The author pronounces it (depending on his mood) as Kay-linn or Kay-lenn. Kay-lenn Kay-Linn (in this interview he corrects the interviewer and explicitly confirms the pronunciation.


7

Hermione is a real name, taken from ancient Greek and along with other classical names was fairly common in English speaking countries around the turn of the 19th century, much like Penelope (still common) and Persephone. Greek derived names are usually rendered into English pronouncing every letter so the conventional pronunciation would be Her-my-uh-knee ...


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