14

There are probably many books that would match, but one possibility that occurs to me is The Galaxy Primes by (the legendary!) E. E. Doc Smith. The protagonists are called Primes, they have telepathic powers and they are on a spaceship. They were four of the greatest minds in the Universe: Two men and two women, all Psionic Primes, lost in an ...


13

It's Quarantine, episode 42, season 1 of the new twilight zone series that aired in 1986. It has all the features that the OP described - engineer revived from cryosleep, peaceful psionic future humans, ship full of old military types. You can view it on YouTube here.


13

Yes. Time Lords have possessed psychic ability as demonstrated going all the way back to the 2nd Doctor, Patrick Troughton, when in "The War Games", The Doctor sent an emergency message* to Gallifrey upon discovering the true nature of the Games. DOCTOR: The only people who can put an end to this whole ghastly business and send everyone back to their own ...


11

It's The Tides of Time by Gordon Eklund - Galaxy March 1977. and later


9

You are describing The Far Side of Evil by Sylvia Engdahl. From the pocket in which, providentially, I had hidden the remains of my bread from yesterday's breakfast, I drew forth two tiny pellets, pellets rolled from soft crumbs. They didn't look at all like bread to anyone who had been given no reason to suspect their origin. "Kari," I said ...


9

Sounds a lot like "Worldmaker" by A.C. Ellis. Here's the cover of the edition I remember: In a world pocked with gutted buildings, looted stores and packs of computer-implanted wild dogs, one man senses more than mere devastation in his surroundings. He begins to grasp that the biochip in his own skull enables him to change reality at will-a tantalizing ...


7

You've summarised fairly accurately the background of the Deathstalker novels, by Simon R Green. They're set in the far future; the empire of man is huge and old, ruled over by the Empress Lionstone. There's no mention of Earth that I can recall. There are citizens with psi powers known as espers, who are treated as second class citizens at best; slaves at ...


6

Here are three examples of early stories with telepathy. The first, from 1889, is a perfect example of what we're looking for. It is antedated by Jules Verne's 1885 novel Mathias Sandorf as noted in b_jonas's answer; I mention it only in case there is some doubt as to whether there is real telepathy in Verne's novel. The second example, from 1871, is not a ...


6

This is an opinion based on living through the time period in question. At the time there were a lot of folks who believed in Extra Sensory Perception ESP. It was popularly treated in the media and was studied in academia, with pseudo-scientific articles coming out on a regular basis. In the 70's a guy came along called "The Amazing Randi" who offered a ...


5

I'm not sure but this sounds like the Deathstslker series or the prequel novels Mistworld, Ghostworld and Hellworld. These were written by Simon R Green with a wiki link here https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathstalker_(series) Will try and add more details later today when I'm back at my computer but the elements you mention are all present from memory.


5

Taking a rather wild guess based on your very limited info, I'll go with "The Gold at the Starbow's End" by Frederik Pohl. The description from the link: A short story based on an interesting premise that at some point in the (near) future, mankind will stop making interesting, fundamental discoveries because we have too much knowledge and too much ...


4

Sounds a bit like Fourth Mansions by RA Lafferty - does the idea of a toad with a jewel in its head and a character who has to soak his head in a bucket ring any bells? It certainly sounds like it might be a Lafferty story, even if not Fourth Mansions itself.


4

These are just to start the bid, they're probably not the first such story. Mathias Sandorf, the 1885 novel of Jules Verne, has a hero who may or may not be telepathic depending on the answer to my question Can Dr. Antekirtt give hypnotic commands to Carpena from afar? “Liar!”, a short story by Isaac Asimov published in 1941, first anthologized in I, Robot ...


4

Empire: The Chronicles of the Invaders by John Connolly and Jennifer Ridyard From the summary With the fate of the world at stake, Syl and Paul battle the sinister forces of the Nairene Sisterhood The Illyri have conquered and occupied the Earth. The Resistance are nothing more than an annoyance to the alien race of superior technology and ...


3

Are you sure that they gained the mental powers at puberty? Or was that when they lost them? If the latter it could be Timothy Zahn's A Coming of Age. In that book, the mental powers appear at about age five but disappear at puberty. In the first generation on the planet, the all-powerful infants wrecked society and initiated a dark age. However, when it ...


2

I can think of two possible answers, one of which might be the one you seek. The first was a 7-episode 1977 ITV miniseries called Children of the Stones. You can view full episodes on Youtube. This one sounds more like your description, with the "machine" in question being some sort of beam to a black hole using the power of the standing stones in the ...


2

John W. Campbell Jr has several instances of telephatic races - the Venusians in on of the stories from "The Black Star passes" (1930, I think the story is "Solarite") and the dog-descended people from "Invaders from the Infinite" (which was published as a book only in the 1960, but appeared first as in serialized form in 1932). I try and supply more ...


1

In the Marvel Universe, not explicitly. For example, we don't see the X-Men running around with bags of spare Wolverine or Deadpool blood for its healing effects (although technically they could harvest organs from them). It has been done elsewhere - Heroes allowed Claire's blood to be used as healing factors for others, and DC's Deathstroke & Midnighter ...


1

Not the first time, but telepathy was evidently a familiar sf concept by 1928 at latest. The heroes of EE Smith's The Skylark of Space encounter a disembodied being who dismisses them as primitives because they "don't even understand telepathy - -". No explanation is given as to what telepathy is, so presumably Doc Smith took it for granted that his readers ...


1

Early season eight when Madame Vastra had to put the Doctor asleep through psychic means, and the Doctor said he might overwhelm her. Seems to indicate psychic abilities as well.


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