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58

The origin of the dark elf / light elf trope can be traced back as far as the 13th century, where Dökkálfar (dark elves)and Ljósálfar (light elves) are mentioned in the Prose (or Young) Edda by Snorri Sturluson. Here, the Ljósálfar are described as "fairer than the sun to look at", while the Dökkálfar are "blacker than pitch". It is unclear whether the ...


51

The first example of the "dark elves" as a distinct dark-skinned, subterranean, evil sub-race of elves may actually be their appearance in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Prior to that, "dark elf" was largely just used as a synonym for evil creatures characteristic of Nordic/Germanic folklore; there was no particular distinction between the Döckálfar (...


43

Yes The Southrons were described as both Swarthy and Brown Sam, eager to see more, went now and joined the guards. He scrambled a little way up into one of the larger of the bay-trees. For a moment he caught a glimpse of swarthy men in red running down the slope some way off with green-clad warriors leaping after them, hewing them down as they fled. Arrows ...


41

Originally posted on Gaming.SE for a similar question. Mixed-race children like Jagar Tharn exist, but are exceedingly rare The prototypical example of a mixed-race individual is Jagar Tharn, villain of the first game: Arena. While there was a lot of in-universe debate over what he was, it was clear that he was an Elf mix, but didn't have human lineage (i.e....


35

Similarity is completely coincidental. It is commonly assumed that Swift meant for the word Houyhnhnm, as well as other words from that language to sound vaguely like a horse's whinny. Houyhnhnm itself is pronounced who-in-em (or who-ee-in-em) which does appear to be modeled after a whinny. Rohirrim on the other hand is derived from Sindarin, the Elvish ...


33

I agree that orcs can have good qualities, for example loyalty: Orcs will often pursue foes for many leagues into the plain, if they have a fallen captain to avenge (FotR 351). What would be other reason than (twisted) sense of honour, it's like this "they killed ours so we want revenge". Uruk-hai are even more "nationalistic", proud of ...


33

Per Memory Alpha's article on "Hybrids" Betazoid / Tavnian (Lwaxana Troi's and Jeyal's child) (DS9: "The Muse") Cardassian / Bajoran (Mika and Dukat's child, and Tora Ziyal) (DS9: "Covenant") Cardassian / Kazon (Seska and Culluh's child) (VOY: "Basics, Part I", "Basics, Part II") Romulan / Klingon (Ba'el and several other prisoners in the ...


32

There are no examples of purely mechanical creatures in Tolkien's writings. However, there are examples of constructed creatures1: In a certain sense, the Dwarves themselves are a constructed race, as covered by In The Hobbit, what were the origins of the Dwarves? The crucial difference between Dwarves (in their earliest days) and Elves and Men is that the ...


27

I think that this and even more so this link explain the issue quite well. To the latter I might add that an axe makes for a much better chopping weapon than a sword, making it more usable for the rank-and-file soldier, especially given dwarves' archetypical stature, lack of fine dexterity and any willingness for exquisite swordplay. There are other ...


27

Caitians A Caitian Federation Council Representative (Star Trek IV) A Caitian Admiral (Star Trek IV) Disputable: Tiburonians Crewman T'Lor, a male Tiburonian (2373) Dr. Sevrin, a male Tiburonian (2269) Tellarites Enterprise version TOS Tellarite. As you can see, the two look quite a bit different - perhaps different races?


23

There is a book in game about it, called "Notes on Racial Phylogeny": After much analysis of living specimens, the Council long ago determined that all "races" of elves and humans may mate with each other and bear fertile offspring. Generally the offspring bear the racial traits of the mother, though some traces of the father's race may ...


22

No there is not. In fact Tolkien hated the 'machine' as he called it. On the 30th January 1945 he wrote a letter to his son which contained: Well the first War of the Machines seems to be drawing to its final inconclusive chapter – leaving, alas, everyone the poorer, many bereaved or maimed and millions dead, and only one thing triumphant: the Machines. ...


21

As an individual who admires energy, tenacity, courage and faithfulness, I believe Ugluk of Isengard (introduced in The Two Towers) has more than "mildly positive traits." A captain of the fighting Uruk-hai, he commands a troop of orcs that capture the hobbits Merry and Pippin, bringing them partway to Isengard before he is killed by horsemen from Rohan. ...


21

As I've discussed elsewhere on this site, there's no indication that Middle-earth's creation myth is incompatible with evolutionary theory; so the most likely explanation is this: In The Beginning, Ilúvatar created Men Sometime later, Men woke up and dispersed across the lands. This, at least, we know to be the case, as told in the published Silmarillion: ...


17

This is a common genre trope. Elves are tall and slender, Dwarves are short and stout. Making a physical difference like this is a common way to point out that the two groups are meant as a foil of one another. Elves use swords and bows, weapons requiring flexibility and precision, representations of elegance. Elegance is power. Dwarves use axes, hammers ...


17

The two guys on the right. This is from Star Trek VI. I have no idea what species they are, but (a) they are truly alien, (b) their differences do not have to do with the skin colour of the actors, (c) their differences do not have to do with make-up retconning, and (d) their differences are not a plot point.


16

Yes. You can find a full list here. DS9 Tora Ziyal is a Bajoran-Cardassian hybrid. In the DS9 episode The Muse, Lwaxana Troi and her husband Jeyal have a half-Betazoid half-Tavnian child. In the DS9 episode Covenant, Mika and Benyan have a half-Bajoran half-Cardassian baby. TNG In the TNG episode Parallels, Worf and Deanna Troi have children who are ...


15

Yes In short, the Haradrim and Southrons were described as dark skinned and more asian looking with darker skin. Further, Ghan Bûri Ghan's people were also described as darker skinned. Whereas the Gondorian and Arnorian (including Nûmenoreans) were more fair and "European" looking. The Haradrim were described as "Swarthy" with brown hands ...


13

There are many examples. Vulcans: The Vulcans have large racial diversity. TOS's Spock, VOY's Tuvok, and ENT's T'Pol all appear to be different ethnicity. Furthermore, the Romulans are still biologically similar enough to the main Vulcans to be inter-compatible, but they're distinct enough that certain medical treatments won't work the same, as mentioned in ...


13

As far as I can tell, no. The two closest would be: Sora Bulq, who wasn't human but a Weequay humanoid with dark brown skin. He fell to the Dark Side and trained with Count Dooku, before being killed by Quinlan Vos. Kar Vastor, a member of the Korunnai, who wasn't a Sith, but certainly used the Dark Side of the Force. Both examples are from Legends. ...


12

While not really a origin of the idea, Terry Pratchett's take is succinct: [...] carrying a dwarfish axe. It was a mining axe, with a pick point on one side, in order to go prospecting, and a real axe blade on the other, in case anyone tried to stop you. From The Fifth Elephant.


12

The Andorians have a completely separate sub species in the Aenar and, even within the main Andorian species there are vast differences in the hue of blue they show. Now a lot of it is to do with retconning but many are of the same time period of Trek shows. Quick edit here (differences in skin colour could just be an Andorian tan but, you can see obvious ...


12

There are no black Sith Lords in canon. In Legends, there are at least two human Sith Lords with dark skin like Mace Windu's. Both are from the video game Star Wars: The Old Republic, which takes place over 3,000 years before the events of the films. Darth Skotia Darth Arho They are from the Sith Empire, which existed before Darth Bane and the Rule of ...


11

In addition to the Trolls and Hobbits you've already depicted, I've found illustrations containing men, elves, dwarves and a picture of Gandalf. In Tolkien's illustration of "Laketown", you can distinctly see 6 men (and a further 5 in the far distance). In this image depicting the "Halls of Manwë" you can see a figure (presumably an elf) at the stern of an ...


10

There are also mysterious giants. We know practically nothing of them, they appear in flesh only in the Hobbit, Stone Giants from the Misty Mountains (other references are few rumours said among hobbits during Lotr and legend of giant Tarlang from which came the name for mountain pass in Ered Nimrais, White Mountains in Gondor). Gandalf quote suggest that ...


10

No illustrations of men, orcs, Ents, or wargs (at least that I know of). The only depiction of Elves that I know of is the painting of Beleg finding Gwindor in the forest of Taur-nu-Fuin:


10

The Breen The Breen consist of four races, who all come from the planet Breen. We never see their differing appearances on screen because they all wear the same encounter suits: I picked this example especially because the fact that there are different races of Breen is never a plot point.


10

Ligonians In the TNG episode "Code of Honor", the Ligonians are humanoids with the following physical description: Ligonians generally resembled Humans of Sub-Saharan African descent physically. (Source)


10

Warning! The list below is somewhat conjecture on my part. Unlike the Ligosians where Memory Alpha explicitly states about their physiology, we don't have much background information on the following species. The basis for this list is that those who we do see are, as far as any Star Trek viewer is concerned, what the typical member of that species looks ...


9

An old conversation, but i thought i'd contribute because you never know who might be wondering and stumble on the page. If i remember correctly, having read most of JRR's stuff, orcs are no longer produced via corrupted elves or men, but instead reproduce sexually, by way of "breeding pits". (i imagine that there are female orcs, perhaps very few, that are ...


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