Hot answers tagged

73

Yes, Lucas addressed this controversy in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter in 2012: Lucas: The controversy over who shot first, Greedo or Han Solo, in Episode IV, what I did was try to clean up the confusion, but obviously it upset people because they wanted Solo [who seemed to be the one who shot first in the original] to be a cold-blooded killer1,...


69

Vader's death wasn't canonically confirmed in the film, nor in the original novelisation which was released several weeks before the film came out (and which, in turn is based on the final draft shooting script). When we last see him (in both the film and the novel) he's blasting off into deep space. To the other side, Darth Vader’s fighter began ...


44

I've got a copy of the 1977 silver screen version: it's got no "Episode IV" in the opening crawl, and Han shoots first. At the end, after the Death Star has exploded and we hear the ghost of Ben say "The Force will be with you ... always", we see a couple of shots in which Vader's fighter stops spinning and heads off into space. We don't see him get rescued, ...


43

The astronaut appears about 44 minutes into Star Wars, just after 3PO moves alongside Luke at the entrance to the cantina. He's in both the theatrical release and the subsequent updated disc I have here. It looks more like the Gemini suit (shown below) than Mercury.


31

Looking at the scene on Youtube, I believe this is the fellow they are talking about It's rather hard to tell anything about him. Fortunately, he appears on the higher definition re-release as well Tweaking the picture a bit gets us a better look We can tell there's an arm patch, but it appears to just be black. There's certainly not a discernible flag. ...


20

I don’t think they’re inconsistent. When Malick is explaining HYDRA’s true history to Ward, he says: HYDRA was founded with the sole purpose of engineering [the Inhuman’s] return. Over generations, HYDRA’s taken different shapes. The entity has been given different names. HYDRA is not a singular entity; it’s made of many people and has many branches. ...


20

Couple quick notes: The Regeneration Borg had the nanoprobe assimilation technique. The Q Who borg did not seem to in that episode or in later ones. The Q Who Borg tended to move slowly and weren't very aggressive, the two who were examining the Enterprise even left after being attacked. Even when Riker and Worf beamed over, the Borg ignored them - ...


16

While Darth Vader was not explicitly dead at the end of the original 1977 Star Wars, the initial film left his ultimate fate open to interpretation. FWIW, I saw Star Wars in 1977 when I was 9 years old at the Loews Astor Plaza in NYC; one of the main theaters showing the film at the time. The idea of sequels wasn’t a complete given back then. I mean there ...


15

Firstly, you'll note that the syringe in the movie is the other way up (it's quite likely so that the words "British made" aren't visible), and whatever it said on this side isn't necessarily the same as on the other side! Getting past that, it would be highly unlikely that anyone ever could make out the words from just the movie. Below is a screen grab ...


15

No. I saw “Star Wars” (later called “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope”) in a movie theater1, maybe not on opening day, but in the first few weeks of its theatrical release. I distinctly recall telling a friend, “They’re leaving wiggle room for a sequel”, because Vader’s fighter stabilized (after briefly spinning out of control) and allowed him to fly away. ...


14

No. I remembered Vader dying too, the first time I saw the film. But I watched it again later—the same actual print, shown again in the same place just a few days later—and I was wrong. I think I was just so caught up in the excitement of the climax that I didn't even notice the scenes of Vader escaping.


14

how can the apparent obliviousness about the Borg be explained in-universe? I'm not aware of a canonical answer, either in-universe or from producer/writer/etc. quotes. But since you asked how it's possible... One possible way to resolve it is that the events occur on a different timeline. The Star Trek universe is filled with examples of alternate ...


13

I figure its like this... In 2063, the remains of a Borg Sphere (First Contact) crash lands in the antarctic. In 2153, the remains of the borg ship are discovered by a group of scientists and are unearthed. The scientists are assimilated by the regenerated Borg survivors and the transport vessel is stolen. The Enterprise NX-01 persues the vessel and ...


12

The scene you describe features Fry, off camera, falling into the sewer. However, not all sewer water is mutegenic ooze. Only the sludge in the town will instantly turn you into a mutant if you aren't one already. Regular sewer water isn't enough. And Fry was simply falling into the plain-old sewer, where normal waste-water has yet to become mutant-producing....


11

Short Answer: They're almost certainly not "force ghosts". Remember that as explained in the Clone Wars episode 'Voices', a "force ghost" is someone who has died, become one with the cosmic force as all living things do, but have been able to retain their individuality and return from the netherworld. Such beings are unbound by time and space but are ...


10

In this answer, I will expand (greatly) upon those of @jaysmith and @bjornjoseph. Specifically, an alternate timeline is required to explain the inconsistencies between The Next Generation, Voyager, and Enterprise; an alternate timeline was in fact splintered off from the primary TNG timeline by events that occurred during the film First Contact. The ...


10

The largest retcon is within The Last Jedi. We saw Luke's X-Wing in dismal shape One of the wings is apparently broken and some of the hull has disintegrated, which is about what you would expect for anything kept under ocean water. One canon book even notes Luke made a door from that wing. Considering that they will probably retouch the scene when they ...


8

The official Star Trek web site lists the exam question as a "trick question". There is no answer in the episodes themselves. The OP's question contains two of the three references to the exam question that occur in DS9. (The third reference, which is earlier than these two, is when Bashir is anxiously hoping to reconnect with the class valedictorian who ...


7

While they describe their own list as "partial", the most complete one I've seen is still the one at Wookieepedia as it compares the various versions. But this list of SE changes is also really well done as it includes visual comparisons of the original and SE versions of A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back, and Return of the Jedi. It also includes a ...


6

Yes, he did. This line was incorporated by writer Robert Hewitt Wolfe in response to his (at the time pre-vet) wife: Robert Hewitt Wolfe commented on his wife's reaction to Bashir's mistake: "Celeste was pre-vet. And every time she saw "Emissary" or heard Bashir's line about mistaking a pre-ganglionic fiber for a post-ganglionic nerve, she'd say, They're ...


5

But in Season 1 nobody had a clue of who Nightmare Moon was, nobody recognized her but Twilight. Debatable. When Night Mare Moon appears, all of the ponies are shocked and remain motionless (except Rainbow Dash, who tries to charge her, and Applejack, who holds RD back). They could be afraid precisely because they recognize NMM — or it could just be a ...


5

I know this is an old post, but after watching (or rewatching) this episode today, I began looking for explanations to reconcile this apparent paradox, and thus found my way here. There are some excellent posts here, with still additional alternative explanations that have not yet been posed, so I thought I'd outline two of them. Novikov self-consistency ...


5

According to this review on Amazon, the original wording was "waiting for a cure for Leukemia". Per Amazon Second, there's an "update" in "A Voice is Heard in Ramah..." that makes no sense. Tom Flannery is a character who'd been given 9 months to live when he first walked in to Callahan's. In "A Voice..." it's mentioned that he has some of his ...


3

Although it's not the same canon, it might be instructive to look at the Sith ghosts in The Old Republic. The distinction is that while Jedi pass on to afterlife and then can manifest, for the Sith it's all about avoiding that very final moment of death. Basically, a Sith ghost is (in the words of The Princess Bride) only mostly dead. Although their body is ...


3

Probably 1939, when "a passing motorist" http://www.comicbookreligion.com/?c=18225&unnamed_orphanage_attendants became "Mary Kent" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_and_Martha_Kent


2

Since the OP indicated in comments that this was what he had in mind, I'm giving it as an actual answer. Possibly the Silver Age Flash (Barry Allen)who premiered in Showcase #4 (October 1956). The "original" Flash was the "Golden Age" Flash (Jay Garrick).


2

The flags were changed at the insistence of JJ Abrams because he wanted to divorce his film (as much as possible) from the Prequel trilogy. Abrams, fresh from his speech about the importance of details, sits at the center of the editing room, at a computer set-up that allows him to draw with a stylus on images on the big screen in front of him, ...


2

Here's my take on it: paradox. Predestination paradox to be precise. Follow along best you can. The reason Picard and crew didn't know about the Borg is because Archer's actions hasn't happened yet. Yes, it was 200 years in the past but from the Fed perspective it hasn't happened yet. But from the Borg's (Q Who) it already has. Think 4 dimensions instead of ...


2

I think Futurama might be quite a good example of this. There are numerous "trapdoors" built into earlier episodes that give the writers the opportunity to add retcons without the need to re-animate. The most famous is of course in the Pilot episode where you briefly see Nibbler's shadow under Fry's chair, a fact that isn't then mentioned until the 7th ...


2

When The Shadow debuted in pulp magazines in 1931, he was aviator Kent Allard, and he blackmailed Lamont Cranston into allowing Kent to assume his legal identity. When the radio series debuted in 1937, The Shadow was Lamont Cranston with no separate original identity.


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