94

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Now these were the Three that had last been made, and they possessed the greatest powers. Narya, Nenya, and Vilya, they were named, the Rings of Fire, and of Water, and of Air, set with ruby and adamant and sapphire; and of all the Elven-rings Sauron most desired to possess them, for those who had them in ...


92

Gandalf was Istari and did not properly belong to the mortal lands of Middle-Earth anyhow. Elrond (by his choice) and Galadriel (by her blood) were Elvenkind and destined to grow weary of Middle-Earth. They long to take the Straight Road1 to the Blessed Realm as time goes on; they do not pass their days forever in Middle-Earth. The Hobbits Frodo and Bilbo (...


83

quote from The Silmarillion From the Chapter headed: Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age: "...they were given unto the hands of the Wise, who concealed them and never again used them openly while Sauron kept the Ruling Ring. Therefore the three remained unsullied, for they were forged by Celibrimbor alone, and the hand of Sauron had never touched ...


76

Probably because Saruman considered Gandalf's Ring useless to him. Elrond says of the Three Rings generally, [T]hey were not made as weapons of war or conquest: that is not their power. Those who made them did not desire strength or domination ... but understanding, making, and healing, to preserve all things unstained. from "The Council of ...


74

In my opinion, it's a way to say that hobbits are considered a negligible quantity in the game between Good and Evil (at least before the events of the Lord of the Rings). The fact that a hobbit may play a major part in the War of the Ring was completely overlooked by both sides - except, maybe, by Gandalf. Another way to see hobbits as "unlikely creatures" ...


74

I don't think it really mattered. The Ring tempted people with whatever power they craved. Look at the temptations that Sam suffered when he briefly took care of it in The Choices of Master Samwise: Already the Ring tempted him, gnawing at his will and reason. Wild fantasies arose in his mind; and he saw Samwise the Strong, Hero of the Age, striding with ...


72

Balrogs were Maiar, of which Sauron (and Gandalf) were also both examples. We do know that Gandalf, with the limitations imposed on him in his "mortal" form, could have defeated Sauron with the Ring (from Letter 246): "It would be a delicate balance. ... If Gandalf proved the victor, the result would have been for Sauron the same as the destruction of ...


71

I just have to pitch in because I've been bugged by this sentence for as long as I can remember. From a purely statistical point of view, the sentence would appear to be nonsense, the ring had in fact been picked up by a hobbit before, but never by say a horse, making said class of creatures infinitely more unlikely (this is perhaps debatable, but stay with ...


62

We learn about Saruman's knowledge of Gandalf's possession of the ring in Unfinished Tales: And the Grey Messenger [Gandalf] took the Ring, and kept it ever secret; yet the White Messenger [Saruman] (who was skilled to uncover all secrets) after a time became aware of this gift, and begrudged it, and it was the beginning of the hidden ill-will that he ...


60

Yes, the Ring continued to extend Bilbo and Gollum's lives after they stopped bearing it up until the destruction of the Ring. Gandalf himself alludes to this when talking about Bilbo: it might take a long while for the influence to wear off. ... he might live on for years, quite happily: just stop as he was when he parted with it. Since neither ...


60

No, Sauron held the Nazguls' Rings. It's mentioned in a few places: Letter 246: ... Sauron, who still through their nine rings (which he held) had primary control. ... Fellowship of the Ring, when Gandalf tells Frodo, "the Nine [Sauron] has gathered to himself; the Seven also, or else they are destroyed." Unfinished Tales: Sauron’s “...


60

The full verse is: Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. One Ring to rule them all. One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the ...


55

Because as Himarm mentions above, they couldn't be enslaved via the rings, and in fact (from Sauron's point of view) the only effects they had on the dwarves were positive: For the Dwarves had proved untameable by this means. The only power over them that the Rings wielded was to inflame their hearts with a greed of gold and precious things, so that if ...


53

After the wearers of the Nine Rings had become the Ringwraiths, Sauron -- who at that time still possessed the One Ring -- took their Rings from them. In a letter, Professor Tolkien wrote, Sauron ... still through their nine rings (which he held) had primary control of their wills. from The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien; emphasis mine.


51

Gandalf was given Narya by Círdan the Shipwright because he believed that Gandalf had the highest inner greatness of all the Istari (Wizards). The scene is described in The Silmarillion: Take now this Ring, for thy labours and thy cares will be heavy, but in all it will support thee and defend thee from weariness. For this is the Ring of Fire, and ...


50

Sauron himself was quite powerful, being a Maiar and indeed the chief Maiar of Melkor in his rebellion. This would have put him in a similar position to that of Eonwe, the Maiar who lead the war against Morgoth who was described in the Silmarillion as greatest of arms in Arda Even before the rebellion Sauron was being described as a great craftsman ...


50

Because the Elves who possessed them took them off From The Silmarillion: But the Elves were not so lightly to be caught. As soon as Sauron set the One Ring upon his finger they were aware of him; and they knew him, and perceived that he would be master of them, and of all that they wrought. Then in anger and fear they took off their rings. The ...


47

It is said that the ring has a will of its own, or rather it has a bit of the will of Sauron. The ring intentionally slipped off Isildur's finger; Isildur did not merely lose his grasp.


44

It seems likely that Galadriel would have destroyed Sauron (and the Ringwraiths). She intimates as much in "The Mirror of Galadriel". And now at last it comes. You will give me the Ring freely! In place of the Dark Lord you will set up a Queen. And I shall not be dark, but beautiful and terrible as the Morning and the Night! Fair as the Sea and the ...


42

From Wikipedia: The One Ring was created by the Dark Lord Sauron during the Second Age in order to gain dominion over the free peoples of Middle-earth. In disguise as Annatar, or "Lord of Gifts", he aided the Elven smiths of Eregion and their leader Celebrimbor in the making of the Rings of Power. He then forged the One Ring himself in the fires of Mount ...


40

That's a very good question! My suspicion is that the inscription is of Sauron's doing, but the full verse was created separately. The full verse in question: Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne In ...


38

I think this isn't taken to be literally nor as something that happened (off-screen). I always considered this scene in a different way (never thought about some sickness, wound or whatever): Arwen insists on staying in Middle-earth to be with Aragorn. As such she won't be able to escape with the other Elves leaving to the West. If Sauron wins (which might ...


37

It was gold. It may not be clear from LOTR itself whether it's actually gold (the metal) or just golden (color), but History of Middle-Earth clarifies the matter, and also explains why Sauron chose gold: Sauron's power was not (for example) in gold as such, but in a particular form or shape made of a particular portion of total gold. Morgoth's power was ...


37

After his death, Gandalf was send back by Eru, the supreme being. Eru was probably able to send Gandalf back with his ring. The Ring might be attached to its owner in a magical way. Saruman was also unable to take Gandalf's ring during his imprisonment in Orthanc.


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