95

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Now these were the Three that had last been made, and they possessed the greatest powers. Narya, Nenya, and Vilya, they were named, the Rings of Fire, and of Water, and of Air, set with ruby and adamant and sapphire; and of all the Elven-rings Sauron most desired to possess them, for those who had them in their ...


83

quote from The Silmarillion From the Chapter headed: Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age: "...they were given unto the hands of the Wise, who concealed them and never again used them openly while Sauron kept the Ruling Ring. Therefore the three remained unsullied, for they were forged by Celibrimbor alone, and the hand of Sauron had never touched ...


74

Balrogs were Maiar, of which Sauron (and Gandalf) were also both examples. We do know that Gandalf, with the limitations imposed on him in his "mortal" form, could have defeated Sauron with the Ring (from Letter 246): "It would be a delicate balance. ... If Gandalf proved the victor, the result would have been for Sauron the same as the destruction of ...


63

No, Sauron held the Nazguls' Rings. It's mentioned in a few places: Letter 246: ... Sauron, who still through their nine rings (which he held) had primary control. ... Fellowship of the Ring, when Gandalf tells Frodo, "the Nine [Sauron] has gathered to himself; the Seven also, or else they are destroyed." Unfinished Tales: Sauron’s “...


60

The full verse is: Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. One Ring to rule them all. One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them In the Land of ...


55

Because as Himarm mentions above, they couldn't be enslaved via the rings, and in fact (from Sauron's point of view) the only effects they had on the dwarves were positive: For the Dwarves had proved untameable by this means. The only power over them that the Rings wielded was to inflame their hearts with a greed of gold and precious things, so that if ...


50

Sauron himself was quite powerful, being a Maiar and indeed the chief Maiar of Melkor in his rebellion. This would have put him in a similar position to that of Eonwe, the Maiar who lead the war against Morgoth who was described in the Silmarillion as greatest of arms in Arda Even before the rebellion Sauron was being described as a great craftsman ...


50

Because the Elves who possessed them took them off From The Silmarillion: But the Elves were not so lightly to be caught. As soon as Sauron set the One Ring upon his finger they were aware of him; and they knew him, and perceived that he would be master of them, and of all that they wrought. Then in anger and fear they took off their rings. The Silmarillion ...


47

Not only could they, they were. The Three were originally given (by Celebrimbor, their maker, one presumes) to Gil-galad and Galadriel. But only Galadriel kept hers: Gil-galad gave his two to Elrond and Círdan, who gave his to Gandalf. But at the end it became known that they had been held at first by the three greatest of the Eldar: Gil-galad, Galadriel ...


45

That's a very good question! My suspicion is that the inscription is of Sauron's doing, but the full verse was created separately. The full verse in question: Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne In the Land of Mordor ...


38

After his death, Gandalf was send back by Eru, the supreme being. Eru was probably able to send Gandalf back with his ring. The Ring might be attached to its owner in a magical way. Saruman was also unable to take Gandalf's ring during his imprisonment in Orthanc.


38

I think this isn't taken to be literally nor as something that happened (off-screen). I always considered this scene in a different way (never thought about some sickness, wound or whatever): Arwen insists on staying in Middle-earth to be with Aragorn. As such she won't be able to escape with the other Elves leaving to the West. If Sauron wins (which might ...


37

It was gold. It may not be clear from LOTR itself whether it's actually gold (the metal) or just golden (color), but History of Middle-Earth clarifies the matter, and also explains why Sauron chose gold: Sauron's power was not (for example) in gold as such, but in a particular form or shape made of a particular portion of total gold. Morgoth's power was ...


35

It's really a very simple answer: Sauron is made up of a life force, which before the ring was made, put him at 100% life force. He then decided "Hey, I can put some of this life force into a ring, and then twist it so that I have awesome super powers." So he did. Before you know it, he's going house on people and teaching them what's what. Then Isildur ...


35

Someone who has access to the books can provide the exact quote. But somewhere in the appendices there is a quote that goes something like this: "Cirdan, who could see deeper than anyone else in Middle Earth" saw that Olorin (Gandalf) was the better bearer for the ring. There is also a quote from Cirdan, something like "take this ring, as it will help you ...


33

When Sauron forged the one ring and put it on his finger, the other ring bearers were immediately aware of him and his intentions and removed their own rings. There is no reason why they couldn't merely do so again. As soon as Sauron set the One Ring upon his finger they were aware of him; and they knew him, and preceived that he would be master of them,...


33

When Galadriel calls Sauron "him who holds the Seven and the Nine", I would say we're supposed to read that phrase as if she's giving him an ad-hoc title. She's not really claiming that Sauron literally has possession of 16 rings of power, because I can't imagine she would not know better. Using the same quotes that @Matt Gutting uses, we can see Gandalf ...


32

The Markings were made intentionally. From the council of Elrond, Gandalf tells of his trip to Saruman and Gondor. Gandalf describes what he learned from Saruman: "The Nine, the Seven, and the Three," he said, "had each their proper gem. Not so the One. It was round and unadorned, as it were one of the lesser rings; but its maker set marks upon it that ...


32

No names are given for either the Nine or the Seven Throughout the Lord of the Rings and other related material (including the essay Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age in the Silmarillion) only the Three Elven rings are given names. In Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age the fact that the Three were different to the others is specifically called ...


31

Sauron was a fallen Maia. His race was Ainur. There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Ilúvatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought... -- First words of the Ainulindalë They were the primordial spirits, who existed with Ilúvatar, and with him created the world through The Ainulindalë, The ...


30

No, the fact that Frodo saw Galadriel's Ring does not mean he saw Elrond's and Gandalf's. After all no mention is made of it, and it is a "big deal" that he saw it on Galadriel's finger. It seems unusual to let it pass if he noticed either Gandalf's or Elrond's so I think it's reasonable to assume that he did not, in fact, see it. Having said ...


30

No, the Elves would not have wanted to give any of the Three to a mortal. There are a couple of reasons why not: When Sauron was presumed destroyed, the Elves were using them. It's worth remembering why the Elves wanted the Three Rings in the first place (emphasis mine): It was in Eregion that the counsels of Sauron [disguised as Annatar] were most ...


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