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72

Yes, he did. This was a fairly common thing for him to do; many of his stories demonstrate this behavior. It's more true with his Juvenile works, but it was common for him to specifically write his characters so that the reader would identify with them, not indicating anything about race, only later to drop some kind of information that hinted pretty ...


71

First, major differences: Moral/philosophical/ethical/political/social underpinnings. The novel was an ode to the citizen soldier, with in-depth asides for explaining the ethical and political system of humanity. Christopher Weuve's excellent "Thoughts on Starship Troopers" resource addresses this in great detail with supporting cites, see especially "...


67

First and foremost, I'd point you at Spider Robinson's essay on the matter in Requiem. Then I'd suggest that you read Podkayne of Mars or Poor Daddy or The Bulletin Board. Heinlein's female characters pick their own life paths and often choose to have both family and careers. They have aspirations to accomplish things in life and better themselves, they ...


64

This is a reference to Horace, Ode 1.3: Illi robur et aes triplex circa pectus erat qui fragilem truci commisit pelago ratem primus My Latin is rusty, but basically "the first man to sail fragile ships in the deep ocean wore armor of oak and three layers of bronze around his chest. The term "aes triplex" becomes from this a metaphor for courage, ...


62

As late as 1980, the year of publication for Expanded Universe, a book of fiction and essays, Heinlein made no apology for Starship Troopers. He attacked the book's critics as largely being unable to adequately understand written English. Heinlein also made a case for increasing the requirements for the franchise in some fashion and offered some serious ...


47

There is no ambiguity in the scene where it is revealed Juan Rico speaks Tagalog. I added something to myself and Bennie said "What did you say?" "Sorry, Bernado. Just an old saying in my own language....." "But what language was it?" "Tagalog. My native language." (End of Chapter 13)


38

There are actually plenty of details about their work, for example in Learning Curve, Heinlein's authorized biography. It may have been classified at one time (most war operations were as a matter of course) but it's not any more. De Camp and Asimov wrote about it too. L to R: Heinlein, De Camp, Asimov There have been rumors that the group were somehow ...


36

Asimov vs Heinlein Asimov and Heinlein did have some disagreements, according to this article on io9: Primarily their conflict became a political disagreement, as Asimov revealed in his posthumous 1994 autobiography. and later on: Living longer than Heinlein allowed Asimov to have the last word in the debate, bashing the release of Heinlein ...


32

It's somewhat of an oversimplification to say that Heinlein was a one-dimensional Cold War hawk. He was a socialist in his youth, and probably formed his first political opinions before Stalinism existed. (Stalin came to power when Heinlein was 17.) He was active in Upton Sinclair's socialist End Poverty in California (EPIC) movement, and campaigned for ...


31

I took it to mean that the Surgeon wasn't a Roughneck. As in, he was attached to the Starship crew, rather than to the Roughneck platoon. They don't mention the fact that the Pilot stays behind, but that's obviously so; the Roughnecks are merely hitching a ride along on a Navy transport, so the Navy crew is distinct from the Army platoon. This is reinforced ...


29

It is indeed Heinlein, from 'If This Goes On'. TL&DR version -- the term they use is: "connotational indices" Long Version: It's from when Johnny and Zeb are discussing the upcoming plans: 'Do you seriously expect to start a rebellion with picayune stuff like that?' 'It's not picayune stuff, because it acts directly on their emotions, below the ...


27

Although the answer by dmckee is outstanding, it is never-the-less incomplete. People who argue that Heinlein was sexist or lacked proper forward thinking forget about a couple of critical details. The first is that he was born in 1907. He grew up in a time and a society that had certain views about women - what they should be like, and what they were ...


25

There's a scene in the book where on the first day of boot camp, the super-hardass Sergeant Zim accidentally breaks someone's wrist in a hand-to-hand combat demo. He says "I'm sorry. You hurried me a little," and sends the soldier off to the hospital. In the movie I remember a similar scene at the start of boot camp where the sergeant deliberately and ...


25

At least two major themes remain from the book: Citizenship (and the right to vote) is earned, not just something you are born into. Alien bugs at war with humans Beyond that, not so much remains. There is no powered battle armor. I suppose some of the character names may remain, and Buenos Aires gets crunched in both, but not much else.


25

That is definitely Farnham's Freehold, it begins with a lot of bridge playing, and then a nuclear war or something breaks out.


25

Well, one leaps to mind: The therapeutic Waterbed. Heinlein described it in detail enough that there was some issue on the patent. To quote from the Stranger in a Strange Land page: Stranger contains an early description of the waterbed, an invention which made its real-world debut a few years later in 1968. Charles Hall, who brought a waterbed design ...


25

First of all, we are talking about Starship Troopers, the book, right? Too bad they never made a movie based on it. ;) The society depicted in Starship Troopers seems fascist only at the first glance: military seems to be in power, and corporal punishment is widely used. However, people only get citizenship and suffrage after their military service, and ...


24

Farnham's Freehold. :) The woman you are thinking of is Barbara, friend to the main character's daughter, Karen. She joins them for dinner, a nuclear attack is reported, they hide in the Fallout shelter, where they play Bridge to pass the time.. then things start to get strange. Trying to limit my spoilering here... They are at dead-center (or so they ...


24

This is going to be anecdotal, but I would say at this point it's impossible to draw a conclusion. As far as I know Heinlein never said if the Mobile Infantry is based on any specific branch. Heinlein's military service in the Navy would push me towards the Marine Corps as the influence. The quote "Come on you Apes, do you want to live forever?" is ...


24

This is a reference to the Last Supper---there is a lot of oblique reference to the end of the story of Christ in the last chapters of the book. Mike is going out to be martyred. Or at least to have his body martyred as he discorporates in the martian fashion. Though it takes place off stage, we know that the finger is subsequently cooked into a soup to be ...


23

Heinlein's Number of the Beast features a vehicle that can travel through space and time and to fictional worlds such as Oz and Barsoom.


22

I was searching around for some well-cited academic analysis and/or non-fiction Heinlein might have written that could clarify his intentions and beliefs relevant to feminist criticism and came upon this question. I can't do much more than round out the perspectives on Heinlein's general portrayals (as being mostly positive) with some canonical examples that ...


22

Parallel strips with a 5 mph speed differential between one strip and the next; high-speed lane in the middle, low-speed lanes at the sides. They glided down an electric staircase, and debouched on the walkway which bordered the north-bound five-mile-an-hour strip. After skirting a stairway trunk marked "Overpass to Southbound Road," they paused at the ...


21

Your obvious negative opinion of Heinlein's ideas has led you into a false premise... The society of Starship Troopers isn't fascist, it's very clearly not a dictatorship. One of the points of the novel was to examine what a society might look like if voting was restricted by something other than age, but it's still a democratic society, not a totalitarian ...


20

The call and response was: Caller: Life is short. Responder: But the years are long. Caller: Not while the evil days come not.


19

...You got me, it's a tip of the hat to Heinlein. I've put in several homages to my favorite authors and at least one nod to a television show so far...but yep, that's Heinlein. However, the reasons the character Ia gives for boot chevrons during Basic Training in the first book, A SOLDIER'S DUTY, are the actual reasons the DoI (Department of Innovations) ...


19

It's We Can Build You. Well, I think it is because my edition has on page 5: To Robert and Ginny Heinlein, whose kindness to us meant more than ordinary words can answer. However the edition on Amazon does not have this page. My edition is the 1994 one from Vintage Books/Random House while the one on Amazon is a 2012 edition from Mariner Books/Houghton ...


19

The story Time for the Stars has the Long Range Foundation which does what you say: it invests in projects very unlikely to yield any short-term profit but somehow keeps hitting paydirt. In the story, they're involved in a project to develop telepathic skills in twins so that ships can be sent out into space and still be in touch with each other and earth. ...


18

I think the only explanation given is that when Mike has the same number of "neuristers" as a human brain has neurons, he wakes up. They kept hooking hardware into him ... Human brain has around ten-to-the-tenth neurons. By third year Mike had better than one and a half times that number of neuristors. And woke up. Somewhere along evolutionary chain ...


18

Mike really did have an awesome AI. If you read Moon by itself, the question could be valid, but Mike, Mannie and Wyo all show up in later books, and, in fact, 'The Cat Who Walks thru Walls' has recovering Mike as a major plot point. The nature of his growth thru 'Moon' is a major reason they want to acquire him; Deety (a computer expert) points out that ...


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