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Zelazny wrote in a 1967 letter to fellow writer Andre Norton that the title Nine Princes in Amber had dual intent. First, it referred to the city itself with the influences that it would have on the people there. Second, it referred to characters embedded like insects in amber – “individuals frozen in timeless moments of some particular passion or phase of ...


19

Per Zelazny's own words; "Lord of Light was intentionally written so that it could be taken as a science fiction or a fantasy novel. On the one hand, I attempted to provide some justifications for what went on in the way of the bizarre; on the other, I employed a style I associate with fantasy in the telling of the story. I wrote it that way on ...


18

The first novel was called 'Nine Princes in Amber', and there appears to be a pun in the title. All nine princes - as well as their sisters - are represented by the cards which preserve their image from a specific moment in time; also Amber is the 'real' reality and the others, including ours, are only shadows, and its image is preserved in the original ...


16

In general, it starts in the 'More or less' present. Then, after they leave the monastery, there is a scene where they hide in the trees for a moment, as a heavenly vehicle passes.. From there, you go back to Sam's history, basically remembering how things got to where they are now. After that, they return to 'now' for the finale. To break it down a bit ...


12

Youtube has the Chronicles of Amber, read by Roger Zelazny. This link is to Nine Princes in Amber, but will play through the entire series.


9

Grayswandir is a specialized artifact linked and attuned to the Pattern and to Corwin. Though Corwin's magical abilities were limited mostly to walking through Shadow and using the Trumps, he had a special ability to be able to call his sword to him as he moved through Shadow. His entry in Wikipedia expands further upon Grayswandir's nature and powers: ...


8

Wikipedia answers your question here, quite explicitly. I don't have much to add other than this paragraph: Corwin's valedictory to Dara, "Carmen, voulez-vous venir avec moi? No? Then goodbye to you too, Princess of Chaos." probably alludes to Lolita; the "Carmen" line is included by Humbert Humbert in his narration of speaking to Dolores Haze near the ...


7

Disclaimer: I'm working towards attaining my Ph.D in English particularly focusing on Science Fiction and American Literature. That being said, Zelazny is my favorite author and I have studied the Amber novels for years. So, while the following is essentially speculation, I am also not merely making things up as I go. Zelazny filled the Amber series with ...


7

When Merlin created a trump he called on The Logrus. We can assume – as it is never described in detail – that the Amberites can call on The Pattern in the same way.


7

The short answer is, Read And Find Out - you're only on the first book of a 10 book series. The longer answer... Yuuuge spoiler: However, in the 2nd book in the series, as summarized by Wikipedia: The rest of the book describes an attack such as you suggest... no other technology, though; I believe Internal Combustion Engines are also said or implied not ...


7

You can watch a video here with Zelazny reading from his own works;


6

Shadows are cast by the Pattern (emphasis mine): ...but of Shadow I have this to say: there is Shadow and there is Substance, and this is the root of all things. Of Substance, there is only Amber, the real city, upon the real Earth, which contains everything. Of Shadow, there is an infinitude of things. Every possibility exists somewhere as a ...


6

Richard's answer makes sense (that it draws on the power of the Pattern/Logrus) but there's probably more to it than that...when Corwin is imprisoned in the first book, he's stuck in the cell until Dworkin happens by to draw him an exit on the wall. If one could just draw on the pattern himself to create a trump/exit, why didn't Corwin just do it himself? ...


5

The short answer is that Corwin is speaking to Dara but referring to her as Carmen. His reasoning for doing so is complex, as alluded to in the previous answer. If you want a fuller explanation as to why (because it is a multi-layered allusion), read the section "A Too-Clever Allusion?" in the essay "Suspended in Literature: Patterns and Allusions in The ...


5

If from the same source, you mean they are somehow bound together in either a creation-myth or are related in some particular fashion, yes, The Pattern and the Logrus (and their representative icons, the Unicorn and the Serpent) are related, though as readers the true relationship both of them is never revealed. All we know is they are two of the Universe'...


5

TL;DR - Merlin went to a land "which lies between the shadows", inaccessible to the Pattern and the Logrus, but not their higher-order (or higher-chaos) progenitors, the Unicorn and the Serpent. The place is never given a specific name. All quotes are from Knight of Shadows, end of chapter 3 and into chapter 4. Merlin wakes up after having been knocked ...


5

Warning. May contain spoilers! I was intrigued by this question, so I tried to look into the book to see if I could find some clues or discrepancies. I even constructed a mindmap for some of the tidbits after searching for "ages", "years" and "thousands". If you have a mind to it, you can view it at https://app.mindmup.com/map/_free/2019/02/...


4

The last book of the Merlin set goes deeper into the mythos and makes it clear that the Unicorn and the Serpent are higher-level Order & Chaos beings. The Jewel of Judgement is one of the eyes of the Serpent. The Jewel definitely creates/repairs multiple patterns in the book. The origin of the Logrus was never discussed though I think it was suggested ...


4

If you read the Dawn of Amber there is a scene in which Oberon is speaking with Dworkin about creating Trumps. Oberon commented that Dworkin creates the card using a different technique than he'd seen his brother use. His brother always had The Logrus as the starting point in the background and painted the rest of the scene over it whereas Dworkin did not ...


4

In Nine Princes, Corwin remarks that any of The Blood can find shadows in which they are worshipped as gods. Clearly, this is one of those shadows for Corwin. Lightning upon his breast is the Jewel of Judgement, The Horn is that of the Unicorn, and Enemies against Enemies is back to his blood relatives and those of the Court. This was written as prophecy, ...


4

Never described, but we can assume the names and Arthurian allusions indicate that something similar to the fall of Camelot transpired, with a bit of the Song of Roland thrown in, in the betrayal by Ganelon. Corwin ruled under his own name (as Benedict mentions it is not a name given to children there) but presumably played the role that Arthur did. Of ...


4

It is not ever spelled out explicitly, but the implication is that Jack believes his fortress is wherever he happens to be. All the other powers on the dark side of the planet have specific domains that they control, but Jack is unique, in that his domain consists of every place that lies in shadow. Jack has no fixed dwelling, but he considers all sorts of ...


3

As far as I know, Roger only drew the barest hint of the pattern once. I have a cocktail napkin with a partial sketch of the pattern (and Roger's home address at the time) on it. It is such a partial sketch that it really is worthless for forming a more formal, complete drawing of the pattern. I wish there was something more complete, but from what I ...


3

The Illustrated Roger Zelazny contains this rather disappointing depiction of the Pattern: (sorry for bad scan but you are not missing much). IDK how much involvement or input Zelazny had to this work. His name is on it, and it does contain one original work of his, "Shadowjack". Even more disappointingly, the Visual Guide to Castle Amber contains no ...


3

What I love about this novel is how the author either inadvertently or quite knowingly has created a modern religious epic, tempting the reader to recognize the thin veneer of all religious works and ideals. In this narrative the truths of life, obscured by the convolutions of human and theoretically godlike machinations become stripped of their mystical ...


3

I read it as an anti-theist story. The original settlers ("the First") use advanced technology combined with their psychic powers to set up a world in which various ideas of Hinduism are carried out in physical reality. The First set themselves up as gods, living up in heaven and receiving the prayers of the people down below. When people die, their brains ...


2

An interesting take on this, similar to Thaddeus's answer but not identical, can be implied from the Amber Diceless Roleplaying Game by Erick Wujcik, which had some creative input by Zelazny, so can be seen as at least partially true to canon, or at least a reasonable interpretation of it. In the game, characters are created by assigning points to specific ...


2

There is also the metaphysical contrast of chaos and order, where ultimate chaos is frenetic, dynamic, and eternally inconsistent while ultimate order is unchanging as if it were frozen in amber. The pattern in Amber, the thing that gives it it's "Amber-ness" is not the primal pattern, but is one step away from it. Even the primal pattern itself, it ...


1

It is NOT mentioned in Zelazny's books. It is only mentioned in Book 3 "To Rule in Amber" of Betancourt's prequels. “It is tied to the Keye – ” “The what?” “The Keye…” She hesitated. “It is ancient, like the Logrus, and very powerful. There is no time to explain. Father must not ask the Feynim for help or protection” “Whoa! The Feynim? Who are they?...


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