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205

The Ring made its wearer invisible by shifting them mostly into the Unseen world. Gandalf told Frodo: You were in gravest peril while you wore the Ring, for then you were half in the wraith-world yourself. Gandalf also stated: if [a mortal] often uses the Ring to make himself invisible, he fades: he becomes in the end invisible permanently, and ...


150

You're not the first to have asked this question; in fact Sam pondered the very same thing on the way to Mount Doom (RotK Book VI Chapter 2: The Land of Shadow): 'I don't like the look of things at all,' said Sam. 'Pretty hopeless, I call it – saving that where there's such a lot of folk there must be wells or water, not to mention food. And these are Men ...


127

It is quite simple: Sauron did not expect, and could not conceive, anyone would actually try to destroy the Ring instead of claiming it for themselves. "He is in great fear, not knowing what mighty one may suddenly appear, wielding the Ring, and assailing him with war, seeking to cast him down and take his place.That we should wish to cast him down and ...


105

Sauron could not fathom anyone being able to withstand the power It is stated in the Council of Elrond, as other methods of disposing of the ring are brought up, when Gandalf makes a point that Sauron would never think of anyone wanting to destroy the ring, because of the great power it possesses: "Into his heart the thought will not enter that any will ...


89

Presumably for weapon-making In an early draft of Fellowship, Tolkien wrote a margin note saying: Mithril is now nearly all lost. Orcs plunder it and pay tribute to Sauron who is collecting it - we don't know why - for some secret purpose of his weapons not for beauty. History of Middle-earth 7 The Treason of Isengard Chapter IX: "The Mines of Moria ...


88

I think it's fair to say that when Frodo put on the ring in the novel, Sauron was (in order of events); Panicked (what the hell!?) Scared that the Ring is in such a vulnerable position (indicating that he knows that it's somewhere that it can be destroyed) Angry (at instantly realising that everything his enemies have been up to has been an elaborate ruse) ...


81

No, according to Tolkien himself Sauron had a physical form in the third age: ...in a tale which allows the incarnation of great spirits in a physical and destructible form their power must be far greater when actually physically present. ... Sauron should be thought of as very terrible. The form that he took was that of a man of more than human stature, ...


80

Who is more powerful, the President of the United States or the marine guarding him? In personal one-on-one combat I'm certain the marine would defeat the President. However, it is the President that commands the military of the United States. Similarly, other Middle-earth creatures may have been more powerful individually (Balrog, Dragons, etc) but ...


70

Elrond and Boromir (at the Council of Elrond) lay out a few good reasons why it's imperative that Sauron's ring is destroyed now; He'll just keep coming back His Ring was lost but not unmade. The Dark Tower was broken, but its foundations were not removed; for they were made with the power of the Ring, and while it remains they will endure. The ...


69

Gollum was claiming an almost dormant ring, plus he was not claiming the One Ring, he was just claiming possession of a gold ring that turned you invisible. It was coincidental that it was the One Ring - it was not that which caused Gollum to claim it. Gollum was not claiming it against Sauron, but just trying to treasure a simple magical ring. On the other ...


69

Sauron could not read Tom Bombadil’s mind without Tom’s permission, palantír or no palantír. In fact, he could not read anyone’s mind without their permission. Tolkien explains what we would call telepathy as ‘sanwe’, communication from mind to mind. Pengolodh says that all minds (sáma, pl. sámar) are equal in status, though they differ in capacity and ...


64

Sauron himself was not seen in the movie, only his Great Eye. As to his destruction: from the chapter The Last Debate from The Return of the King Gandalf says of the One Ring "If it is destroyed, then he will fall; and his fall will be so low that none can foresee his arising ever again. For he will lose the best part of the strength that was native to ...


63

No, Tom could not have defeated Sauron. As Gandalf mentioned, Tom could not use the Ring's power - rather the Ring did not affect him. 'It seems that he has a power even over the Ring.' 'No, I should not put it so,' said Gandalf. `Say rather that the Ring has no power over him. He is his own master. But he cannot alter the Ring itself, nor break its ...


62

This was a key point of Gandalf and Aragorn's strategy, and the whole reason they led the army of Minas Tirith to the Black Gate of Mordor. The hope was to draw not only Sauron's attention, but his armies as well, leaving Mordor itself unguarded. Book 5, ch. 9: [Gandalf]: ‘His doubt will be grow­ing, even as we speak here. His Eye is now strain­ing to­...


62

Aragorn states this in The Two Towers after the death of Boromir. 'I have not seen these tokens before,' said Aragorn. 'What do they mean?' 'S is for Sauron,' said Gimli. 'That is easy to read.' 'Nay!' said Legolas. 'Sauron does not use the Elf-runes.' 'Neither does he use his right name, nor permit it to be spelt or spoken,' said Aragorn. 'And he ...


61

The previous answers offer a good explanation of the book canon, but since your question is clearly inspired by the Great Eye of the movies, I'll make the distinction more explicit: The colossal, fiery "Great Eye" is a creation of the movies... In the book, it's mostly a metaphor and a logo for Mordor, while Sauron has a normal physical body. He never ...


60

Saruman knew that without a Great Ring of his own he was no match, power against power, for even a Ring-less Sauron. But he had concluded that the West no longer had any hope of resisting Sauron. If he could not defeat Sauron himself by making his own Great Ring or (better yet) finding Sauron's, then he thought the smart thing was to become Sauron's ally --...


60

Sauron passed a tremendous amount of his own native power as a Maia into the Ring he forged. Gandalf outlines the situation to Frodo in "The Shadow of the Past": He only needs the One; for he made that Ring himself, it is his, and he let a great part of his own former power pass into it, so that he could rule all the others. Tolkien, the Old English ...


59

Book 5, Chapter 4: 'Is Faramir come?' [Denethor] asked.'No,' said Gandalf. 'But he still lived when I left him. Yet he is resolved to stay with the rearguard, lest the retreat over the Pelennor become a rout. He may, perhaps, hold his men together long enough, but I doubt it. He is pitted against a foe too great. For one has come that I feared.''Not – the ...


57

He had indeed already taken a physical form, at least to some degree, for he was the Necromancer mentioned in the Hobbit, whose realm bordered upon Mirkwood. But at that point he had not regained a large portion of his power and worked mostly in secret. He also greatly feared two things. First, the return of Numenor's heir, Aragorn, and the sword ...


56

Whilst you might have some good logic, Galadriel disagrees Female elves can be corrupted, so it's not unreasonable to think so could female humans or in fact females of any species.


56

A clever leader might have tried to intercept the call for aid, yes. However, it is a common theme in the trilogy (and all of Tolkien's works to be honest) that the powers of evil are cunning, but also easily blinded by their arrogance. Remember, the assault on Minas Tirith, as fearsome as it was for the humans, was not a critical part of Sauron's plan. If ...


55

Because as Himarm mentions above, they couldn't be enslaved via the rings, and in fact (from Sauron's point of view) the only effects they had on the dwarves were positive: For the Dwarves had proved untameable by this means. The only power over them that the Rings wielded was to inflame their hearts with a greed of gold and precious things, so that if ...


53

After the wearers of the Nine Rings had become the Ringwraiths, Sauron -- who at that time still possessed the One Ring -- took their Rings from them. In a letter, Professor Tolkien wrote, Sauron ... still through their nine rings (which he held) had primary control of their wills. from The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien; emphasis mine.


53

Balrogs were a specific type of Maia - spirits of fire - whereas both Sauron and Saruman were mentioned as being not of that type. The only other Maia of this type mentioned in the texts is Arien, the guide of the Sun: ...and she was chosen because she had not feared the heats of Laurelin, and was unhurt by them, being from the beginning a spirit of fire,...


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