26

This is "A Death in the House," by Clifford D. Simak. Since its first publication in 1959, it has appeared in numerous anthologies. Summarized here: In "A Death in the House," Mose Abrams, an irascible old farmer comes across a crashed spaceship and a dying alien. He tries to get help for the alien, but nobody does anything for it. ...


26

This sounds like Homefaring, a novella by Robert Silverberg published in 1984. The consciousness of a man named Jim McCulloch is sent forwards in time by millions of years by mistake (the experiment was aiming at an interval of a few hundred years). He awakens in the body of a creature very much like a lobster: and yet there were differences. They were ...


25

That sounds like Gotta Sing, Gotta Dance, by John Varley, originally published in Galaxy, July 1976, and reprinted in the collection The Persistence of Vision, published in 1978. It's one of his Eight Worlds stories. The names of the protagonist symbiont pair are Barnum & Bailey. I'm not sure of the gender (it's been a few decades since I read the story),...


20

This is "A Little Intelligence" (1958) by Randall Garrett and Robert Silverberg. The story takes place during a peace conference of the Pogatha from Capella IX; they are being hosted in a cathedral since it is the place where Earth Government believes they will learn the least useful information about Earth and its technology. The protagonist is ...


16

Pretty sure this is Out of Copyright by Charles Sheffield, first published in the May 1989 edition of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. The story is set in the mid-21st century, and the first-person narrator heads one of four teams competing for a contract to transform Jupiter's moon, Europa, into a planet capable of supporting life. Because ...


12

As per comments in Short story about an astronaut being shot by his own bullet, Ben Bova's "Men of Good Will", readable on the Internet Archive here. In the near future, the Cold War has spread to near-Earth space, occasionally sparking into moments of heat. For some reason, however, the Moon seems to be a zone of armistice. The Norwegian UN ...


8

I think David W has got it right! It's The Voyage of the Space Beagle by A. E. van Vogt. The main protagonist of the novel is Dr. Elliott Grosvenor, the only Nexialist on board (a new discipline depicted as taking an actively generalist approach towards science). Sounds right to me. Thanks David!! JLW


7

The Monster by A. E. van Vogt Aliens visit Earth, and find no living animals, just lots of skeletons. The aliens have technology capable of returning to life any animal or person for which they have a skeleton. They visit a museum. First they revive an Egyptian Pharaoh, who thinks he is in the after-life. Then the aliens kill the Pharaoh with a ray gun. Then ...


7

And, of course, after I post a bounty, I find some references. It seems this is likely "What Time is It?" by Jack Haldeman II. This Straight Dope message board post: There’s a science fiction story that postulates that the first use of faster than light travel is to carry aging baby boomers far enough out into space to see “Howdy Doody” and other ...


7

"The Man Who Saw the Future", a short story by Edmond Hamilton, available at Project Gutenberg. You may have read it in one of these compilations. Henri Lothiere is pulled from the 15th century to the 20th by two scientists: "There was a sound of voices, and I turned to find that two men were bending over me. They were men like myself, yet ...


6

By googling various versions of the pun, I eventually found the story We'll return, after this message by John Walker, better known as a programmer and a co-founder of autoCAD. He maintains a website named fourmilab, where among other things, he posts short science fiction stories. I must have visited the site before, because several of the other stories ...


6

The Wrong World By J. T. McIntosh, which appeared in Galaxy Magazine in December 1960. The plot, as I recall it, is that human-like aliens conquered earth with nearly no significant resistance due to their overwhelming technology, including energy shields functionally similar to those in Dune. Afterward, many of the invader's officers decide to stay on Earth,...


6

I think this is probably the novella Barrier by Anthony Boucher. The protagonist is John Brent and he is sent 500 years into the future in an experiment. The story starts: The first difficulty was with language. That is only to be expected when you jump five hundred-years, but it is nonetheless perplexing to have your first casual query of: “What city is ...


5

After asking the question, I looked at an old copy of "Requiem" in an anthology that was printed during the time span when McIntyre and Charlie were born, but is now getting closer to Harriman's age in "Requiem" every year and every decade. And I found some clues to the date. Harriman has a memory from when he was about 17: "Son, I ...


4

Sounds like Isaac Asimov's (very) short story Silly Asses. Read it here. Wikipedia summary. The people of Earth have developed atomic power. As such, they are recorded by Naron the Rigellian, the long-lived Keeper of the galactic records, as having achieved maturity. But when the keeper learns that they have not yet penetrated space and that they test their ...


4

Could this be Suite Mentale by Randall Garrett, published in Future Science Fiction issue 30 in 1956? The story is drafted as for the movements of a piece of classical music (overture, nocturne etc.) This story opens with a neurosurgeon operating on a man who has been shot through the head, effectively lobotomizing him, his condition is discussed with a few ...


4

The story you are thinking of is "The Candidate" by Henry Slesar in 1962. It has been published in a lot of anthologies, so it could have been any of those that you read it in. I found a filmed version of it: This one has Vietnamese subtitles, but is in english. I haven't read the written story, only seen the short,...


3

The story you are looking for is "Brain in a Pocket" by Rob Chilson, published in Analog, May 1986. The particular story I'm looking for involves a group of educators that are discussing student use of these machines, with much the same arguments that were used against student use of calculators once they'd dropped in price to the point they were ...


2

This could have been a story by John Campbell. The description not quite fits that of Aarn Munro, a native of the Jupiter colony. Adapted to a gravitational pull more than twice Earth, Aarn has much denser bones and more powerful muscles (as well as being a superman in almost every other regard), and is able to lift both his sidekicks Spencer and Carlisle ...


2

I remember that one. I read it in Puffin Annual Number One as a boy (though I think it was probably published elsewhere too) and was called The Boy, the Dog and the Spaceship (1974). The author is Nicholas Fisk. From tygertale: Nicholas Fisk, fresh from creating Grinny, one of the creepiest children’s books of all time, stays on form here with another sci-...


2

I am lucky to be able to answer this because I, too, read this as a kid long ago. But wouldn't have remembered if I hadn't come across a connection as an adult. A couple years ago, I read the book Midworld, by Alan Dean Foster, which is the full length novel of the world that your aforementioned "night sky" camouflaged predator originally comes ...


1

This is "Brain Jag" (1987) by Rob Chilson, and it appears to have only been published in Analog, June 1987. My memory of the art is confused with another story, but it does show an artist at an easel. My memory of the setup of the story is also incorrect; Professor-Emeritus Morea is called in by the court to be an expert witness in the case where ...


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