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37

This is The Immortal Bard by Asimov: The physics professor, Dr. Phineas Welch, has gotten himself slightly drunk and begins speaking with Scott Robertson, a young English teacher. Welch announces, "I can bring back the spirits of the illustrious dead." [...] "So," he continues, "I tried Shakespeare." [...] Eventually, Welch says, he enrolled ...


35

That is "Founding Father" by Isaac Asimov. I have it here in front of me in the short story collection "Buy Jupiter." The story is from 1965. You have the basics of the story pretty much correct. A ship crash-lands on a planet that has a high amount of ammonia in the atmosphere. Since the astronauts can't leave(and can't call for help), they explore the ...


21

"Trouble with Treaties" Katherine MacLean & Tom Condit The story has all the mentioned elements: hostile aliens, fake controls inside the fish tank, and the human crew screaming... It's The Cat! ...when the ship's cat enters the room.


18

Poul Anderson, "Epilogue" It starts: His name was a set of radio pulses. Converted into equivalent sound waves, it would have been an ugly squawk; so because he, like any consciousness, was the center of his own coordinate system, let him be called Zero. He was out hunting that day. Energy reserves were low in the cave. The other one who may ...


16

"The New Reality", a novelette by Charles L. Harness, also my (unaccepted) answer to this old question and this one; first published in Thrilling Wonder Stories, December 1950, available at the Internet Archive. The story matches your description, but Bishop Berkeley is not mentioned. Does any of these covers look familiar? The theory: The ontologist ...


15

This is the story "Far Centarus" by A.E. van Vogt as suggested by the comment. If you check out page 81 of the story in the January 1944 issue of Astounding Science Fiction, you'll find the term "adeledicnander electronic psychology" used for the technology which powers their FTL drive, which pretty much conclusively matches what you remember.


14

The River of Time by David Brin. Previously identified as the answers to People on different time streams and Story-identification, short story with time dilation. The story starts with people suddenly moving in very slow motion: I don't think anyone knows exactly when it began. It seemed a fatal disease, at first. Dozens, possibly hundreds, were buried ...


13

I may have found this. So far, I have been unable to find a summary of the story you were looking for, but it looks like it was written by Jim Shepard and published in the September, 1985 issue of Atlantic Monthly. If I can find more detail, I will add it. edit: it appears to be in his Batting Against Castro book, which is a collection of short stories. ...


13

This sounds like an Outer Limits episode called "The Duplicate Man", first aired in 1964. (Clone created to kill an alien animal, doesn't know he's a clone at first, I think I even remember the window part). It was based on "Good Night, Mister James", a novelette by Clifford Simak, published in 1951, available at the Internet Archive.


12

The Vision of Milty Boil by Howard Fast. I read it in his anthology The General Zapped an Angel. The eponymous Milty Boil is the developer who manages to get the minimum ceiling height reduced: And Milty made friends and built influence. By 1975, at the age of thirty-five, he was considered the most influential man in New York City. His influence was ...


12

"Mgamu", a short story by Lord Dunsany in his collection The Fourth Book of Jorkens. The story is told in the Billiards Club by Jorkens, who is repeating the story told him by a man named Polder who encountered the sivver-verri. "The sivver-verri," said Jorkens, "is described by the natives as a distinctly unpleasant beast. I have heard them describe him ...


12

The 4th story is "Born with the Dead", a 1974 novella by Robert Silverberg, which was the (unaccepted) answer to this old question. It was first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, April 1974, which is available at the Internet Archive. Here's a description from Majipoor.com: In the 1990s, doctors have discovered how to rekindle dead ...


12

"Land of the Great Horses", a short story by the great R. A. Lafferty. You may have read it in Lafferty's collection Nine Hundred Grandmothers or in Harlan Ellison's anthology Dangerous Visions. From Wikipedia: "Land of the Great Horses" is a short story by R. A. Lafferty from Harlan Ellison's science fiction anthology Dangerous Visions. The story takes ...


12

Passage for Piano by Frank Herbert. The main protagonist is Margaret Hatchell: Had some cosmic crystal gazer suggested to Margaret Hatchell that she would try to smuggle a concert grand piano onto the colony spaceship, she would have been shocked. Here she was at home in her kitchen on a hot summer afternoon, worried about how to squeeze ounces into her ...


11

I think this is the story "The River of Time" by David Brin, which I read in his anthology of the same name. At the start of the story, some people seem to just freeze in place, then people start disappearing. Initially there are attempts to care for the frozen people, until it is realized they are aware, conscious and moving, just extremely slowly. (...


11

I suspect this is "Courier of Chaos" by Poul Anderson. The world of the far past was a terrible one to Ushtu — but no more terrifying than Ushtu himself was to Earthlings ... Found with a search for "Ushtu" future Earth.


11

Arthur Clarke's A Walk in the Dark. It ends For there could be no mistaking the rattle of monstrous claws in the darkness ahead of him. Also the answer to these old questions: Looking for a short story about a man walking on an alien road at night, stalked by some unseen alien animal (closed as duplicate) Man travelling alone across a planet, thinks ...


11

What Do the Simple Folk Do? by Alan Dean Foster. I read it in his anthology Who Needs Enemies, which according to the ISFDB is the only place it has been published. The old actor is Slappy Williams (I'm not sure we ever learn his real forename). His death is described as: By the way, did you happen to catch the 'Slappy Williams Hour' this evening?" "No....


10

This is "Something Green" by Fredric Brown (1951)1. It is about an astronaut named McGarry who crashes on a planet with only red vegetation and has a "little five-limbed creature" named Dorothy who he talks to about wanting to see green (emphasis mine): He stopped ten paces short of the edge of the red jungle and aimed the sol-gun at the bushes behind ...


10

This could be Day of the Giants by Lester del Rey, from 1964. Apparently it is an expansion of a short story published in Fantastic Adventures (December 1950, and again in 1970), called When the World Tottered. I'm not familiar with the short story, so I'm unsure what story elements were in it. (Note, the cover illustration has absolutely nothing to do ...


10

Looks like this is "The Dwindling Sphere" by Willard Hawkins. It was also an unaccepted answer to the question "Future humans build using dirt, go to war over small amounts of it" An inadvertent invention can be used to make most anything, but it "consumes" a large part of the mass it transforms. The story follows the idea ad absurdum to the point where ...


10

You may be thinking of The Sentinel, a short story by Arthur C. Clarke. The alien artifact in that story was a translucent Tetrahedron, which matches your description. This short story provided the inspiration for a rather well known film.


10

Hunter, Come Home by Richard McKenna. From the anthology Casey Agonistes. The leaves that fly are the Phytos. Annoyingly I have mislaid my copy of the book so I can't give my usual quotes. However the story is about the attempt to kill the indigenous life using some form of bioweapon called Thanasis. The rings are structures formed by Thanasis as it battles ...


9

William Tenn, Brooklyn Project. Also an accepted answer to this old question: Short story ID: Bouncing-Ball Time Travel The answer to the older question is extremely well done, please see it for details.


9

Overhead by Alexandra Erin, published in 2016 on medium.com here. First lines: Politics, they say, is the art of the possible. Logistics, then, must be the art of the convenient. In the beginning, warehouses were organized in the order that things seemed to fit into them, and then in orders that made sense on the surface to human sensibilities. ...


8

The Story of the Late Mr. Elvesham by H.G. Wells Young man, Edward George Eden is approached by old gentleman Egbert Elvesham who has the intention to: find young fellow, ambitious, pure-minded, and poor, healthy in body and healthy in mind, and in short, make him my heir, give him all that I have." He repeated, "Give him all that I have. After ...


8

Hunter's Moon by Poul Anderson. The flyers are the Ouranids and the land dwelling species the Dromids. The trace element that the Ouranids accumulate in their bodies is manganese. The new tao is: "Oh…they’ve acquired a new—no, not a new religion. That implies a special compartment of life, doesn’t it? And ouranids don’t compartmentalize their lives. Call ...


8

"Petals of Rose" (1981), by Marc Stiegler The short-lived aliens' lifecycle is as you described, with biochemical transfer of learned skills (but not of full identities) to future generations. Several close inter-species relationships develop, always ending in sorrow as the humans outlive their alien friends. To these aliens, human lifespans are ...


7

I'm about ready to bet a pig's butt to a C-note that it is "The Language Clarifier" by Paul J. Nahin ... and aiming to find out. Unlike some answered stories, this one is being difficult to find and read again today to make sure. (Or add those demanded and coveted block-quotes from 30 years back in memory.) This one was indeed in Omni. Searching cross-...


7

This is the Frederik Pohl story "The Snowmen". It has the joke about libido / albedo in it. "...We've frozen the Earth solid, he says, and now it's so shiny that its libido is nearly perfect." I sat up sharply, then relaxed. "Oh. Not libido, dear. Albedo..." You can read it in the December 1959 issue of Galaxy Magazine (where it first appeared) ...


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