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3

This sounds like it might be LeGuin's "Vaster than Empires and More Slow" (1971). A survey ship lands on a forest planet, World 4470. The crew of the survey ship feels fear broadcast at them from the forest even though there are no traces of intelligent life or even any animal life. Eventually they decide that the forest itself is the source of the fear ...


4

Stephen Donaldson's Gap Cycle series includes a black hole being triggered, with consequences for the ships around including one which is hunting the protagonists. This doesn't precisely match your description, but it's worth suggesting.


0

Almost certainly not the answer, but many points are in common with Arsen Darnay's 1978 The Karma Affair, reviewed here. There, a "soul-catcher" was used to capture souls, and they were kept in small cells (even able to see outside, I think). The protagonist or someone close to him had committed a sin (perhaps building the soul-catcher) and was therefore ...


5

How about 'The night of the storm' - short story by Dean Koontz. Quoting description from Wikipedia: "The Night of the Storm": a group of intelligent robots go on a hunting trip in the woods, where they learn that the myth of "human beings" may not be a myth after all. I've got a copy in the 'Strange Highways' collection - may have been published ...


17

This happens in Stephen Baxter's short story Pilot, published in the anthology Vacuum Diagrams. The ship is being pursued by a missile. They skim a black hole, just as you describe, and their passage changes the black hole rotation so that the horizon expands and engulfs the missile. After the missile has been destroyed the pilot, Gage, describes what ...


34

This is quite probably "Requiem" by Edmond Hamilton, 1962. The full text is here (I remembered the story from this German anthology). The general tone matches, although in the story they look specifically for earth, not stumbling over it. "He or she is the only person who understands and mourns the loss of Earth." - that was the captain of the space ship, ...


5

This is "The Man Who Found Out", by Algernon Blackwood, POSSIBLY the origin of the trope. ✓ Tablets of the Gods ✓ Absolute truth of the nature of the universe ✓ The guy is miserable after he finds it ✓ Other guy flips out ✓ Uses hypnosis to erase his memory ✓ Orders servant to discard the tablets and some burnt papers Then he did a curious thing. Taking ...


2

A long shot is "Robot's Return" by Robert Moore Williams. Long shot because the robots are not in the wilderness or being hunted, but they do think that humans are not just "legend", but a crazy baseless myth that is simply too ridiculous to entertain seriously. They must have been invented and constructed by other robots! Some piece of protoplasm could ...


8

The story you describe sounds like The House on Maple Street, by Stephen King. Here's a summary of the story from Wikipedia: After a summer spent abroad, the four Bradbury children return to their home on Maple Street and discover that something is growing upwards through the house's walls from below, replacing wood and plaster with metal and machinery, ...


0

Breaking the Game from the Worthing Saga by Orson Scott Card matches at least your civilization type game part. It was published in 1979, so the tail end of your time frame. The rich can extend their life span by going into suspended animation, but this means letting someone play their civilization in the interim: Herman Nuber has just woken up from a ...


0

The story you describe sounds similar to Habeas Corpus Callosum by Jay Werkheiser, published in the November 2014 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact. A murderer sentenced to life in prison might win a reprieve. Since his conviction, life extension procedures have made humans essentially immortal. Therefore, his life sentence is now effectively ...


3

I think this is Electric Forest, by Tanith Lee. Magdala Cled was born an ugly, deformed child on the Earth Conclave colony planet Indigo, raised in a state orphanage, mercilessly abused by other children, ignored by adults, and now ekes out a joyless living toiling at a factory to earn just enough astrads to pay for a small featureless cube apartment with ...


1

I think I found it. Virtual War by Gloria Skurzynski From the reviews: He has been genetically engineered to have fast reflexes so he and his team can win the virtual war... His days and nights are spent in a box, with virtual walls... Three genetically-engineered young people have been raised and trained their entire life to fight the war: ...


12

A story where sex is turned to male violence against women? Why, who else could it be but James Tiptree / Racoona Sheldon / Alice Sheldon? It's The Screwfly Solution published as by Racoona Sheldon originally. A potential difficulty for our species has always been implicit in the close linkage between the behavioural expression of agression/predation ...


19

This is "The Screwfly Solution" (1977) by James Tiptree Jr. Men start killing their wives, lovers, etc. The protagonist has a husband and daughter, and has a biology background. They recognize some of the danger, and her husband goes to live in the shed away from the women. One day her daughter goes to visit him and is killed, and she runs away. ...


2

It could be "But Who Can Replace a Man?" by Brian Aldiss. A futuristic world in which machines are capable of thinking based on the tasks they have been designed to perform. One day the machines realise that the few remaining humans have died, leaving the machines to fend for themselves. You can read it online as a PDF here.


6

End Game by J. G. Ballard. The story starts: After his trial they gave Constantin a villa, an allowance, and an executioner. The villa was small and high-walled, and had obviously been used for the purpose before. The allowance was adequate to Constantin’s needs—he was never permitted to go out and his meals were prepared for him by a police orderly. ...


6

I think the story you are looking for is House Arrest by Erik Larson. It was published in Arthur C. Clarke's "July 20, 2019: Life in the 21st Century" The story is about an investigator called Frank D Angelo that is making a case against an intelligent house called Arthur that murdered its owner Palmerston. The killing is made by dropping the temperature ...


4

This is probably "Noise Level" by Raymond F. Jones as per Government investigating home library of missing inventor. Many of the country's top physicists are gathered together and are shown film of the inventor hovering using some sort of small anti-gravity device. They are told that, unfortunately, he shortly after died in a crash and is unit was ...


6

I was thinking of 'The Tear' by Ian McDonald. It is in "The Year's best Science Fiction" 26th edition. I had a number of details off in my question and had really forgotten the vast scope of the story. It does start with two characters sailing on a waterworld, but the story basically goes to the ends of the universe and the beginning of a new one. I ...


10

This is almost certainly "The Bells of Acheron" (1957) by E. C. Tubb. It was first published in Science Fantasy, April 1957 which given your description is probably where you read it also. This excerpt from the story copied from this answer seems to match very well. "Laura!" I chased after her, caught her, slapped her face. Her eyes opened and shock ...


2

This might be Ray Bradbury's "The Naming of Names" also known as "Dark They were, with Golden Eyes." Humans move to Mars and find themselves changing, I believe. I also read it in a textbook, albeit in middle school. Here's a quote from the story that mentions the eyes: The sun was hot, the day quiet. There was only an immense staring burn upon the land. ...


5

This also sounds like chapter 17 of Ron Goulart's "When The Waker Sleeps," but only vaguely. My apologies for not expanding on this yesterday morning, but I work second shift and it was already getting late. Otherwise, I would have kept on reading to chapter 21: "Hurray for the President!" shouted nearly a hundred voices. "Which President is this?" The ...


5

Found it, it's called Caspar D. Luckinbill, What Are You Going to Do? (available to read online here). Gunfire rattles on the radio. Neither of us pays attention. I’m used to gunfire now. Violence is my music. When I sit near a radio, it sings of murder. When I stand near an advertisement, it cries. All media recognize me. They conspire against ...


25

Sounds like a chapter from the 6 book series with Covenant: The One Tree by Stephen R. Donaldson. From its Wikipedia page: Covenant and the Haruchai fight their way to Kasreyn's laboratory but discover that Kasreyn has a parasitic being living on his back that provides him with extended longevity and immunity to physical attack. Findail kills both ...


4

Quoting myself: Could it be Ray Bradbury's Frost and Fire (1946)? See this question. According to Wikipedia: Placed there by a past rocket ship that crashed, the people of the storied land are within sight of another rocket ship on a distant mountain plateau. The plot follows Sim, the protagonist of this story, and his apparently short life ...


3

Not quite "only a few days", but part of the plot of Non-Stop by Brian Aldiss is that


30

The Belonging Kind by William Gibson and John Shirley. There's a brief summary on Wikipedia. I read it in the anthology Shadows 4 edited by Charles L. Grant. It's also in Gibson's seminal collection Burning Chrome. It was the damp bills I remembered: In the dim glow of the cab's dome light he watched closely as the man reached into his coat for the fare. ...


12

"The Council of Drones" by William K. Sonnemann A scientist teaches the protagonist how to transfer his mind into the queen bee of a bee hive. The queen is named Masoul because she is the soul of the hive. The protagonist teaches the bees have to use grains of sand to shave the barbs off their stingers. Barbless, they can sting multiple times. With barbs ...


12

I think I've found a couple options for your mysterious collection. If this was Soft by F. Paul Wilson, it was in Masques: All New Works of Horror and the Supernatural. This was printed a little earlier, in 1984, and seems to be mostly horror. Another collection titled Soft and Others: 16 Stories of Wonder and Dread was also published, in 1990, and also ...


22

"Soft" by F. Paul Wilson Can be found in a number of horror fantasy anthologies, including Masques and Soft and Others. See the link above for a full list of places the story has been published. I was lying on the floor watching TV and exercising what was left of my legs when the newscaster’s jaw collapsed. He was right in the middle of the usual plea ...


47

"Just a Hint," by David Brin. First published in Analog (April 27, 1981). I encountered it when I bought a secondhand copy of a collection of several of Brin's early shorter pieces of science fiction (as opposed to his early novels): The River of Time. The basic premise of the plot is just as you described. The point-of-view shifts back and forth between ...


0

I believe this is called “Bodyguard”. People could pay to switch minds. This story follows a man who switches bodies and loses his very good body to a criminal and needs to trick him into switching back. Sounds familiar to what you are talking about.


14

The story you're looking for is The People of the Pit by Abraham Merritt, published in 1918. You can read it here: Everything you remember fits with the story: the temple in the well, the worm-like people, the expedition of a sort, the main character's "sores", his urge to come back, the Lovecraftian atmosphere. It's a solid and enjoyable story, by the ...


5

Based on the names, I think there's a good chance you're thinking of the novella, "Gulf" (ISFDB), first published in Astounding in 1949. The story postulates that humans of superior intelligence band together, and keeping themselves genetically separate, create a new species. In the process they develop into a hidden and benevolent "ruling" class. The ...


8

This sounds like "Crystal Nights" by Greg Egan, first published in 2008. The premise is that a billionaire has bought the rights to an extraordinary powerful computer, and is using it to simulate artificial organisms in the hope that they will evolve consciousness. His initial choice to run the project turns down the job, on the grounds that natural ...


5

Like Eike Pierstorff says in a comment, this matches the seventh voyage from The Star Diaries (Dzienniki gwiazdowe) by Stanisław Lem. In that story, Ijon Tichy is stranded with his spaceship in a time vortex, and ends up together with several copies of himself. The story is humorous, Ijon both gets in fights with his past and future self and has to ...


3

Elements of the description match a couple of Bova short stories – “Escape!” and “Blood of Tyrants” – both are based on the same character being ‘rehabilitated’ but whereas the first has a positive ending the latter has a much darker end. Both can be found in the collection ‘Escape Plus’ – the blurb preceding ‘Blood of Tyrants’ mentions a full novel version ...


11

1928's "The Revolt of the Pedestrians" by David H. Keller is the forerunner of this type of story. Humanity has split into two subspecies: "Automobilists" and "Pedestrians". The motorists have become so dependent on their "autocars" that their legs have atrophied. The motorists have the upper hand at the beginning of the story: There is a scene with a ...


16

Sounds to me like "X Marks the Pedwalk", a short story by Fritz Leiber. It matches the scenario you describe, particularly the old lady shooting at the car as she's being run down. There's also a description of the driver of the car regarding the old lady as a worthy opponent.


7

"Master Race", a short story by Richard Ashby, also my (unaccepted) answer to this old question; first published in Imagination, September 1951, available at the Internet Archive. The aliens find the stuff in the boy's tree house, not his bedroom, and the comic books are unidentified sci-fi comics, not necessarily Superman. Otherwise it matches your ...


45

The Long Sheet by William Sansom. I read it in the anthology The Weird by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer. This anthology was published in 2011, but the story was written in 1941 so you could certainly have read it in the 1970s. The story starts: Have you ever wrung dry a wet cloth? Wrung it bone white dry – with only the grip of your fingers and the muscles of ...


45

This is The Coffin Cure by Alan E. Nourse, available to read online here. After curing the common cold, the hero (Dr. Coffin) discovers that the world is a filthy stinksome place. "But what's happened?" Coffin cried. "These foul smells, everywhere. You, Phillip, you had a cigarette this morning. I can smell it clear over here, and it's bringing tears to ...


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