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-2

Personal Jesus by Jennifer Pelland. I found it in the anthology the page is based on just today. Here's a summary: "Personal Jesus" is an electronic watchdog that everyone must wear, advising proper religious behavior and applying electrical shocks when wearers misbehave. A vignette written as a promotional pamphlet.


5

Circa 1958, I read a short story in a Sci-Fi anthology Perhaps "Quietus", a short story by Ross Rocklynne, first published in Astounding Science-Fiction, September 1940, which is available at the Internet Archive. If you read it in an anthology around 1958, it must have been one edition or another of Famous Science-Fiction Stories: Adventures in Time and ...


2

This is “To Sin Against Systems” by Garry R. Osgood, published on Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, 4th issue. Got it all, the rich guy, the immortal who takes over when he dies, the space station I didn't remember, the promises to work for the better good by the rich man, the way he dies... The story can be read online at the Internet Archive here.


5

While it wasn't my intent to corner the market on answers to questions about sexually powered interstellar drives, I just read a story that is very likely to actually be the answer that was sought. Namely, "Thrust" by Alan Dean Foster. In this story, humanity's first interstellar ship is expected to reach its destination in just over 16 years. But there's ...


22

"Trouble with Treaties" Katherine MacLean & Tom Condit The story has all the mentioned elements: hostile aliens, fake controls inside the fish tank, and the human crew screaming... It's The Cat! ...when the ship's cat enters the room.


8

This is most likely “And Then There Were (N-One)” by Sarah Pinsker The viewpoint character is an insurance claims investigator There is a murder All characters involved in the murder (victims, investigator, suspects) are alternate timeline versions of the main character The only difference is that in appeared in Uncanny, issue 15, March/April 2017. You can ...


7

I'm about ready to bet a pig's butt to a C-note that it is "The Language Clarifier" by Paul J. Nahin ... and aiming to find out. Unlike some answered stories, this one is being difficult to find and read again today to make sure. (Or add those demanded and coveted block-quotes from 30 years back in memory.) This one was indeed in Omni. Searching cross-...


13

Passage for Piano by Frank Herbert. The main protagonist is Margaret Hatchell: Had some cosmic crystal gazer suggested to Margaret Hatchell that she would try to smuggle a concert grand piano onto the colony spaceship, she would have been shocked. Here she was at home in her kitchen on a hot summer afternoon, worried about how to squeeze ounces into her ...


5

Your description perfectly matches One Station of the Way by Fritz Leiber, first published 1968. The world they are currently on is called "Finiswar" (at least in the German translation). The defenses the females have to prevent unwanted cross-impregnation (by consuming the unwelcome sperm) even allows lazy females to solely nourish this way. Oh, and ...


7

This is "The Big Flash" by Norman Spinrad, also the answer to this old question: 60s short story where band gives concert ending with a nuke detonation Here are the last two pages with the chanting.


13

This sounds like an Outer Limits episode called "The Duplicate Man", first aired in 1964. (Clone created to kill an alien animal, doesn't know he's a clone at first, I think I even remember the window part). It was based on "Good Night, Mister James", a novelette by Clifford Simak, published in 1951, available at the Internet Archive.


4

It might be Sales of a Deathman by Robert Bloch It can be read on archive.org Excerpts: What to do with the population problem? Killing people's so messy — unless they'll help! [...] We've got the posters up — everything from "Join the Marine Corpse" to "Uncle Sam DOESN'T Want You!" And there's a big publicity campaign for the development of ...


18

Poul Anderson, "Epilogue" It starts: His name was a set of radio pulses. Converted into equivalent sound waves, it would have been an ugly squawk; so because he, like any consciousness, was the center of his own coordinate system, let him be called Zero. He was out hunting that day. Energy reserves were low in the cave. The other one who may ...


1

Richard Daniel, the robot in in "All The Traps of Earth" was in danger with human law not allowing his obsolescence, but humans were not extinct. In contrast, Jenkins, the robot in the collection of short stories "City" by Clifford Simak is thousands of years old by the end, and humans are extinct. But he is not, as the question says, "in turmoil over ...


3

"All The Traps of Earth" by Clifford Simak The complex changing of events in this story has the robot doing an incredible variety of things to do "[find] a way to go on". (Starting with avoiding being caught and dismantled.) However, in this story, humans are not extinct as mentioned in the question. Another robot of Simak's matches that description, but ...


2

I agree it wasn't a question that could help me zero in on an answer without a lot of guessing what the asker meant. But Number 12 Looks Just Like You is a Twilight Zone story in which everyone, once reaching late teenage, is required to be made over into a beautiful body. There are only a few models to choose from. This is not optional, and not changes ...


0

"Colony" by Philip K. Dick. Robert Silverberg's Worlds of Wonder (As I read it with Robert Silverberg's subtitle "I Trusted the Rug Completely".) One office furnishing: The towel wrapped around his wrist, yanking him against the wall. Rough cloth pressed over his mouth and nose. He fought wildly, pulling away. All at once the towel let go. He fell, ...


9

Overhead by Alexandra Erin, published in 2016 on medium.com here. First lines: Politics, they say, is the art of the possible. Logistics, then, must be the art of the convenient. In the beginning, warehouses were organized in the order that things seemed to fit into them, and then in orders that made sense on the surface to human sensibilities. ...


1

"By His Bootstraps" is a semi-match to that question description, but another story matches other parts of the question more closely. The Bootstrap protagonist does see himself from the future, then visits himself in the past, to become triumphant and live a good life in his world. So, not really stuck in a time loop forever. Robert Silverberg's ...


16

"The New Reality", a novelette by Charles L. Harness, also my (unaccepted) answer to this old question and this one; first published in Thrilling Wonder Stories, December 1950, available at the Internet Archive. The story matches your description, but Bishop Berkeley is not mentioned. Does any of these covers look familiar? The theory: The ontologist ...


3

It matches, and I agree with, the comment linking to earlier question: "Before Eden" by Arthur C. Clarke. But the match is only partial. The part about discarded trash, but it's a large bag of it rather than a single wrapper: It was not puzzled, for it had no mind. But the chemical urges that drove it relentlessly over the polar plateau were crying'. ...


0

Matches well with "This Mortal Mountain" by Roger Zelazny.


1

Could this be The Scapegoat, a novella by C.J. Cherryh? Humans invade a planet and seek negotiations with the locals who commit to total warfare, even down to suiciding to prevent capture. “There was nothing more to be done,” says the elf. “That was why. We knew that you were coming closer, and that our time was limited.” His long white fingers touch ...


7

This is Dean McLaughlin's "The Permanent Implosion", first published in Analog in 1964. The "hole" is termed a congruency; and the story is the tale of successive attempts by the hero, one Mick Candido a well capper, and his team to plug the leak. He does not arrive on the scene, he is called by the government. The wind does not stop; it is merely reduced ...


1

"The Keys to December" by Roger Zelazny. Born of man and woman, in accordance with Catform Y7 requirements, Coldworld Class, Jarry Dark was not suited for existence anywhere in the universe which had guaranteed him a niche. This was either a blessing or a curse, depending on how you looked at it. So look at it however you would, that was the ...


4

"Traveler's Rest" by David I. Masson. Different latitudes on the planet live at different rates. Traveling across them causes one to lose sight of the other latitudes as the time rates are so different that ahead and behind appear only as a blue haze or a red haze. A few seconds in the warring pole latitudes pass while an entire leisurely lifetime could be ...


6

This has just been linked by the more recent question Short story where TV audiences vote on the plot points of live serials and that provided enough extra information to make identification possible. It is What Do the Simple Folk Do? by Alan Dean Foster. I read it in his anthology Who Needs Enemies, which according to the ISFDB is the only place it has been ...


11

What Do the Simple Folk Do? by Alan Dean Foster. I read it in his anthology Who Needs Enemies, which according to the ISFDB is the only place it has been published. The old actor is Slappy Williams (I'm not sure we ever learn his real forename). His death is described as: By the way, did you happen to catch the 'Slappy Williams Hour' this evening?" "No....


7

It looks like a previous answer on our site by Lisa matches your description. The story is G. C. Edmondson, “Technological Retreat” (1956).


12

"Land of the Great Horses", a short story by the great R. A. Lafferty. You may have read it in Lafferty's collection Nine Hundred Grandmothers or in Harlan Ellison's anthology Dangerous Visions. From Wikipedia: "Land of the Great Horses" is a short story by R. A. Lafferty from Harlan Ellison's science fiction anthology Dangerous Visions. The story takes ...


0

The answer can best be described using an analogy the author himself used near the end of the story: “and then it came to him: a seal cylinder. When rolled upon a tablet of soft clay, the carved cylinder left an imprint that formed a picture. Two figures might appear at opposite ends of the tablet, though they stood side by side on the surface of the ...


9

William Tenn, Brooklyn Project. Also an accepted answer to this old question: Short story ID: Bouncing-Ball Time Travel The answer to the older question is extremely well done, please see it for details.


13

I may have found this. So far, I have been unable to find a summary of the story you were looking for, but it looks like it was written by Jim Shepard and published in the September, 1985 issue of Atlantic Monthly. If I can find more detail, I will add it. edit: it appears to be in his Batting Against Castro book, which is a collection of short stories. ...


8

"Petals of Rose" (1981), by Marc Stiegler The short-lived aliens' lifecycle is as you described, with biochemical transfer of learned skills (but not of full identities) to future generations. Several close inter-species relationships develop, always ending in sorrow as the humans outlive their alien friends. To these aliens, human lifespans are ...


11

Arthur Clarke's A Walk in the Dark. It ends For there could be no mistaking the rattle of monstrous claws in the darkness ahead of him. Also the answer to these old questions: Looking for a short story about a man walking on an alien road at night, stalked by some unseen alien animal (closed as duplicate) Man travelling alone across a planet, thinks ...


10

Hunter, Come Home by Richard McKenna. From the anthology Casey Agonistes. The leaves that fly are the Phytos. Annoyingly I have mislaid my copy of the book so I can't give my usual quotes. However the story is about the attempt to kill the indigenous life using some form of bioweapon called Thanasis. The rings are structures formed by Thanasis as it battles ...


6

This is "That Strain Again" by Charles Sheffield. All around us the great blight spreads. Everywhere we look the Earth is dying. We are contagion and bear guilt for the death of this world. ..... Somewhere out there we are going to run into a planet with as big a shock in store for us as our seasons were to the Vegans.


12

The 4th story is "Born with the Dead", a 1974 novella by Robert Silverberg, which was the (unaccepted) answer to this old question. It was first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, April 1974, which is available at the Internet Archive. Here's a description from Majipoor.com: In the 1990s, doctors have discovered how to rekindle dead ...


0

You are absolutely correct! It was indeed "Courier of Chaos" by Poul Anderson. It appears to have been one of his earlier pieces (I did not discover his work until much later on--it's odd that this one stayed with me for such a long time). I found the book it was published in and read the piece. There's more to it than what I remembered--but I did get the ...


7

This is Stanley G Weinbaum's "A Martian Odyssey". There was a line of little pyramids - tiny ones, not more than six inches high, stretching across Xanthus as far as I could see. Also the answer to this old question: Story about a man and an alien exploring an alien world


12

"Mgamu", a short story by Lord Dunsany in his collection The Fourth Book of Jorkens. The story is told in the Billiards Club by Jorkens, who is repeating the story told him by a man named Polder who encountered the sivver-verri. "The sivver-verri," said Jorkens, "is described by the natives as a distinctly unpleasant beast. I have heard them describe him ...


6

This is indeed "Bluff" by Harry Turtledove. I would have read it in Analog, Feb. 1985. The detail in this question about the king being reminded to dredge the harbour confirms this is the same story I'm looking for. The Harry Turtledove site on Fandom has a summary that confirms most of the details I recall. "Bluff" takes its inspiration from the work ...


5

I believe this is "The Giving Plague" by David Brin. I read it in his collection Otherness. The story is told from the viewpoint of a doctor who is fighting a plague (TARP) that came to Earth from Mars. He contrasts TARP with another (endemic) virus called ALAS (for "Acquired Lifetime Altruism Syndrome"); ALAS works within the context of human biology, ...


5

Magic City by Nelson Bond Bond uses a distortion of English to give a sense of distance in time from contemporary events. And while others have done this since, I think his attempt works very well. In many instances, extra syllables are dropped and words are otherwise distorted to give it just a slightly unfamiliar, and yet recognizable feel. And ...


7

This is the Frederik Pohl story "The Snowmen". It has the joke about libido / albedo in it. "...We've frozen the Earth solid, he says, and now it's so shiny that its libido is nearly perfect." I sat up sharply, then relaxed. "Oh. Not libido, dear. Albedo..." You can read it in the December 1959 issue of Galaxy Magazine (where it first appeared) ...


12

The Vision of Milty Boil by Howard Fast. I read it in his anthology The General Zapped an Angel. The eponymous Milty Boil is the developer who manages to get the minimum ceiling height reduced: And Milty made friends and built influence. By 1975, at the age of thirty-five, he was considered the most influential man in New York City. His influence was ...


0

This sounds a bit like Norby's Other Secret (1984) by Janet and Isaac Asimov. The Norby series is set of YA/Children's books about a boy (Jeff) and his rather goofy robot that has special abilities. In Norby's Other Secret, Jeff is summoned to the large castle on the hill by the Mentor, a large four-armed robot. When he and Norby arrive at the castle, ...


5

"No Harm Done", a 1961 short story by Jack Sharkey, first published in Fantastic Stories of Imagination, July 1961, available at the Internet Archive. Does any of these covers ring a bell? Man and woman stood side by side in the hot light of the afternoon sun, staring, staring at the immobile form of the patient whose disrupted mind they were attempting ...


10

You may be thinking of The Sentinel, a short story by Arthur C. Clarke. The alien artifact in that story was a translucent Tetrahedron, which matches your description. This short story provided the inspiration for a rather well known film.


37

This is The Immortal Bard by Asimov: The physics professor, Dr. Phineas Welch, has gotten himself slightly drunk and begins speaking with Scott Robertson, a young English teacher. Welch announces, "I can bring back the spirits of the illustrious dead." [...] "So," he continues, "I tried Shakespeare." [...] Eventually, Welch says, he enrolled ...


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