New answers tagged

4

Yes it is "The Copper Dahlia" by Gerald Kersh (published in Edmund Crispin's Best SF Two and elsewhere). The device is wrecked when a cat jumps on it in pursuit of a mouse. But not before the hero receives horrifying news. He ends by fleeing to a remote corner of the Gaspé Peninsula, and warning everyone to destroy any similar coils which they may find.


4

Gerald Kersh, The Copper Dahlia (1949).


1

I found the name of the story! Here is the description of it on Wikipedia: "macs" is a sci-fi short story by Terry Bisson, published in 1999. The story consists entirely of dialogue between several people and an investigator. The people are telling the investigator about clones that were used to satisfy the Victims’ Rights Closure Settlement – wherein ...


1

Here is something more that I wrote about it. From https://www.newyorker.com/tech/annals-of-technology/albert-einsteins-sci-fi-stories By the time that Felix Eberty, a German jurist and amateur astronomer, anonymously published “The Stars and World History,” in 1846, it was well known that light had a finite speed. Ole Rømer, a Danish scientist working in ...


2

Could this be Dance on a Forgotten Shore, a novelette by Alan Dean Foster and Sally McBride? Sylvie abruptly realized she was still gripping her ax. Retreating a few steps, she buried the blade harmlessly in a log, returning empty-handed to the alien form. There was one last shudder of tension, and then she relaxed completely. Flat like gold ...


12

HP Lovecraft's "The Dunwich Horror" In the isolated, desolate, decrepit village of Dunwich, Massachusetts, Wilbur Whateley is the hideous son of Lavinia Whateley, a deformed and unstable albino mother, and an unknown father (alluded to in passing by mad Old Whateley, as "Yog-Sothoth"). Strange events surround his birth and precocious development. Wilbur ...


47

Assuming you remember the Hiroshima part wrong, you may be thinking of "My Object All Sublime", a 1961 short story by Poul Anderson, which was also the (unaccepted) answer to the question A short story where criminals are sent back in time as punishment?. You might be able to read it at Google Books. Does any of these covers ring a bell? The story is ...


3

Was he a drunk? Instead of the owner of a robot, as described, was he the inventor of the robot using it to serve menial tasks? Instead of finding glasses, could it be other menial tasks? Since I, Robot drew a blank: Is it possible that the mention of the mighty Asimov became a leading question that threw sniffers off the track of other authors on robots? If ...


4

The story is indeed one of the stories you tracked down to Galaxie January 1969. It is Assassin & Son by Thomas M. Disch. The story is set on the planet Sepharad. Sepharadian politics is Byzantine and they employ humans as assassins. The Sepharadians are described as blobs, so that matches your memory that they are amorphous. I found a copy on web ...


39

“Nasty, Brutish &...” by Harry Turtledove. Published in 1989 in Analog. It’s in his collection Departures. The common cold virus was engineered by the ancient Foitani before the Suicide Wars. A Foitan expedition had visited Earth and one of their researchers was killed by humans. (He or another member of his expedition apparently managed to abduct a ...


7

Maybe "Venus and the Seven Sexes", a 1949 novella by William Tenn, with a 1975 French translation by Bruno Martin titled "Vénus et les sept sexes". Wikipedia plot summary: On the planet Venus, the native Plookhs — who require the participation of seven different sexes in order to reproduce — are corrupted by human film director Hogan Shlestertrap. ...


2

Mark Olson found it, thanks a ton! It's definitely "the specter general" by Theodore Cogswell


5

"Franchise" by Isaac Asimov seems the likely suspect. I originally had thought of the movie Swing Vote but its Wikipedia page led me to this story. The story centers around Norman Muller of Bloomington, Indiana, the man chosen as "Voter of the Year" in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Although the law requires him to accept the dubious honour, he is ...


4

You're probably thinking of "Of Missing Persons" by Jack Finney. As he sits and waits in the dark barn, Charley descends into a rage after he concludes he has been played for a fool. He storms out of the barn, but just as he crosses the threshold, he looks back and briefly glimpses, in a flash of light, the planet Verna through the back window of the barn ...


0

This sounds like Wilson Tucker's "The Year of the Quiet Sun" to me. Does the name Brian Chaney sound familiar? Ramjets?


4

Probably not the story you're looking for, but I think it's still worthy as an answer since it matches some of the elements. The 2001 movie Evolution is a sci-fi comedy about a meteor that crashes into Earth that brings an alien lifeform that begins to evolve on Earth itself. Their molecules are nitrogen-based, and the logic is that, since carbon lifeforms ...


6

I think is C-Chute by Asimov. Plot (Wikipedia): During Earth's first interstellar war, a civilian transport traveling to Earth is captured by the Kloros, a chlorine-breathing race of intelligent beings. The ship is commandeered by two Kloros along with six human civilians as prisoners of war. The humans fall into argument and dispute, some coming to blows,...


16

The story you are looking for might be "Hostess" by Isaac Asimov. The Hawkinsites are from a planet that has hydrogen cyanide in the atmosphere. The Hawkinsites need it. Part of their matabolism depends on the cyanide. While on Earth, they have a kind of "oxygen mask" that trickles a small amount of hydrogen cyanide into their respiration system through ...


6

Hostess by Asimov? Starring alien needs low concentrations of cyanide in the air he breathes, so he carries a small cylinder of it with him, and takes a breath from time to time. However oxygen is not poisonous. He is is shot and killed at the end of the story, at the end of a dinner he had been invited to.


10

The alien species might the Ymirites, brainchildren of Poul Anderson. They are a race of hydrogen breathers, who normally don't get into contact with oxygen breathers that much. In the short story Hunters of the Sky Cave, the agent of the Terran Empire Dominic Flandry is investigating an attack on the planet Vixen. The evidence seems to point to the Ymirites ...


7

The story you mention is Flying Dutchman by Ward Moore. This anthology matches the color scheme you describe. The book was previously identified here: Anthology book with story about robotic bombers, h/t to TheLethalCarrot.


35

"Subsoil" (1994) by Nicholson Baker As far as I can tell it first appeared in the 27/06/1994 issue of The New Yorker. From there it has also been published in The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighth Annual Collection (1995) and American Gothic Tales (1996). It can be read online at The New Yorker link but it is pay-walled; I can't find anywhere else it ...


16

Unemployment Problem by Jor Jennings She was shipwrecked and out of a job, if you could call ship's whore a job. If only she could find her true calling... It can be read on archive.org. The quote is: "And that, boys and girls, is way too much of a good thing."


2

As per jwodder's close comment, this does match with an answered question on the site, Story about an alien civilization that lives under the hollow core of their planet where they are trying to reach the surface. That question has an accepted answer of "Mountain" by Liu Cixin. Here's a quote mentioning the problem of piles: “There could have been a ...


8

The looks to be "The Day of the Dragon" (ISFDB) by Guy Endore and first published in 1934, as per the guy looking for it here: Hi, all. I'm looking for a short story in which a mad scientist type believes that crocodiles (or possibly alligators) are descended from dragons, and that he can force individuals to regress back into being dragons by ...


12

The first of those is probably “Common Time” by James Blish. Garrard travels around the speed of light to reach Alpha Centauri. However, instead of experiencing the same relativistic time as his ship, his own time passes about two hours for every second on the ship. Movement is impossible. The second is almost certainly “Stranger Station” by Damon ...


12

"Flight to Forever", a novella by Poul Anderson, which was also my (unaccepted) answer to this old question. First published in Super Science Stories, November 1950 (available at the Internet Archive), it has been reprinted a number of times; does any of these covers ring a bell? The story matches your description fairly well, except that the protagonist ...


4

This is similar to "Pixie Ointment," from Tales of Enchantment, also published as The Kincaid's Book of Witches, Goblins, Ogres and Fantasy; it may or may not have been an adaptation of an earlier folktale. In the story, a woman receives an ointment that she puts on her eyelids—to discover that it enables her to see that pixies up to all sorts of mischief, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included