New answers tagged

1

Stross's 'Laundry Files' novel Atrocity Archives features nazis escaped to another dimension. Also his novella Missile Gap, where the world seems to be gathered into a cosmic petri dish. BTW Charlie your 'buy my books' partnerId links are 404-ing


0

A Meeting with Medusa? Arthur C. Clarke. The Wiki for this novella says, Taking place partly on Earth and partly in the atmosphere of Jupiter, the story tells of Howard Falcon, the captain of a new and experimental giant-sized helium-filled airship. When an accident causes the ship to crash, Falcon is badly injured and takes over a year to fully recover. ...


29

I think this might be Charles Stross's "A Colder War", available to read linked from Wikipedia and the author's website. The main viewpoint character, Roger Jourgensen, is a CIA analyst who writes up a report on the state of both the U.S. and Soviet governments' occult research for incoming President Ronald Reagan. This report attracts the ...


19

This is Neal Stephenson's "Jipi and the paranoid chip" (Wikipedia entry for this short story), written 1997, available here: https://vanemden.com/books/neals/jipi.html ("as it appeared in Forbes, Vol. 160, Issue 1 (7 July 1997)" according to Wikipedia) "The chip" in question resembles the outcome of an Antagonistic Neural ...


16

"Commencement Night" was written by Richard Ashby and originally published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1953. It was anthologized a few times, including in Giants Unleashed, edited by Groff Conklin (1965). The story is as you described; the aim is to discover how human beings act in the natural state. The island is officially named Arcadia as ...


2

Somewhat similar to the episode Rimmerworld from the TV series Red Dwarf. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rimmerworld While the ship is in danger, coward Rimmer takes the only escape pod and ejects. He lands on a barren planet and Teraforms it, creating a population cloned from his own DNA. The two creators of the show fell out, and dissolved their ...


2

Based on recognizing the cover art of the February 1987 issue of Analog, this is the cover story "In the Kingdom at Morning" by Stephen L. Burns. Many thanks to user14111 for tracking down this issue once I made the tentative identification. I have a few of the details wrong; the pilot's name was "Gemyn" and "Crazy Eddie's Kingdom&...


31

Probably "The Forgotten Enemy" by Arthur C. Clarke, borrowable at the Internet Archive. It was first published in 1949 in the New Worlds magazine, then appeared in the 1956 collection Reach for Tomorrow. The Solar System has dived into a belt of cosmic dust; Britain's climate has changed from temperate to arctic. Professor Millward has stayed with ...


10

Softly spoke the Gabbleduck by Neal Asher, contained in The gabble and other stories (2008). The siblings are Tholan and Tameera. Tholan's personal assitant is Anders. The story is told from the point of view of a local guide. Tameera shoots a sheq, also known as shit-eater. The other sheq kidnap her to replace the one she shot and her brother goes in ...


23

"An Eel by the Tail", a short story by Allen Kim Lang; first published in Imagination, April 1951, available at the Internet Archive; reprinted (along with "Pictures Don't Lie" by Katherine MacLean) in the anthology Invaders of Earth edited by Groff Conklin. It's a high school physics class in the future, and the teacher is demonstrating ...


18

"Time in the Round", a novelette by Fritz Leiber; first published in Galaxy Science Fiction, May 1957, available at the Internet Archive; reprinted in the 1958 hardcover anthology The Third Galaxy Reader edited by H L. Gold. The story is also available at Project Gutenberg. The Butcher, the youngest of the three boys and the one who causes all the ...


15

It's not an exact fit because I don't remember a fan being injured, but this is similar to Pinocchio by Walter Jon Williams. I read it in the anthology The Starry Rift edited by Jonathan Strahan. As you say it is set in a future Earth where people can change bodies. Life expectancy has been greatly extended and children are rare and rather spoiled. The main ...


6

"A Matter of Minutes" is the third segment of the fifteenth episode from the first season (1985–86) of the television series The Twilight Zone. This segment is based on Theodore Sturgeon's short story "Yesterday Was Monday", first published in June 1941. It follows a couple who accidentally discover that every minute of time actually ...


20

Not Lovecraft but it was a Lovecraftian author. The story is The Return of the Sorcerer by Clark Ashton Smith. The protagonist, Mr. Ogden (I don't think we learn his first name), goes to work as a PA for the sorcerer John Carnby. The usual Lovecraftian horror proceeds, and we eventually learn that John Carnby murdered his brother Helman out of jealousy: He ...


21

The first story you mentioned might be The Music of Minox by Howard Goldsmith. It was published within the More Science Fiction Tales: Crystal Creatures, Bird-Things & Other Weirdies anthology in 1974. The cover has a black background, with a fair bit of yellow in the middle and lower half, and the title written in white letters near the top. The stories ...


4

"In A Good Cause -- " by Isaac Asimov, as mentioned in a comment by user14111. Reprinted in "Nightfall and Other Stories" (1969). Originally appeared in 1951 in "New Tales of Space and Time". Two friends, Dick Altmayer and Jeff Stock. Altmayer is an idealist and is imprisoned three times. Stock disagrees with his approach, ...


7

As far as I can tell, this was a rhyme going round British schools starting in the mid/late 1950's. I can't find an original source. Including the original poster and my conversation with my mother and aunts (as mentioned in my comment), I can find four references to this rhyme each with different words. This would be understandable for a rhyme being passed ...


8

"Amen and Out", a short story by Brian Aldiss, first published in New Worlds, August 1966, available at the Luminist archives. It has been reprinted in some anthologies and collections. At length, Otto rolled over and snapped open his portable shrine. The light failed to glow behind the altar. "What's matter? You lot feeling dim too? ...


2

I'm going to post my own answer since the linked question doesn't cover many of the points in my question. The exact story I'm thinking of is "Not Always to the Strong" (1986) by Timothy Zahn. The back story is, as the above comment notes, mostly from "The Shadows of Evening" (1983) and is covered in this answer. The bit about the ship ...


7

This hasn't collected a better answer yet, so I'm going to propose "Mana" (1937) by Eric Frank Russell. Originally published in Astounding, it was reprinted in The Best of Eric Frank Russell (1978, rereleased with a new cover 1986). In the story, Omega, the last human, is attempting to leave a legacy of the human race by uplifting ants to ...


4

Sounds like Other People by Neil Gaiman. It was first published in the November 2001 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Here's a relevant excerpt from a review: In Gaiman’s “Other People,” the secret is that the demon at the beginning of the story is not really a demon, but a regular man who had been sent to Hell, and that the ...


6

Sounds like "The Chronology Protection Case" by Paul Levinson. Summary from Amazon: When NYPD forensic detective Phil D'Amato takes a call from a lady physicist about her missing husband, he has no idea that her life, his life, and every other scientist working on a top-secret time travel project will soon be in dire jeopardy. As the number of ...


11

Might this be Sandkings by George R.R. Martin? It was first published within the August 1979 issue of Omni, then later included within a short story collection entitled Sandkings, published in December 1981. It was also published within Volume 5 of The Hugo Winners, as you suggested it might've been. The Wikipedia synopsis appears to match most of what you ...


1

Could it be The Body Snatchers? A novel filmed several times as Invasion of the Body Snatchers. The plot is about an alien invasion. The aliens are duplicates of people. The duplicates take over when the original person falls asleep. As soon as they do so, their body crumbles to dust, and their duplicate is activated. They aren't zombies, but they are ...


4

Pretty sure this is The Endless Pavement (1973) by Jacqueline Jackson. This review seems to match your description very closely: A forbidden apple brings salvation in this uncommon fable, set in a grim future when people live in Home-a-Rollas, children go to School-a-Rollas, individuals are bolted into their own personal rollabouts, everyone watches auto ...


8

The story you recall is Richard Matheson's "The Distributor", and it appeared with "Shottle Bop" in Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Stories to Be Read With the Door Locked, which is not an SF anthology per se, but does contain some such stories.


4

There is a story called Gateway of the Mind on the Creepypasta web site that is close to your description. But it was written in 2009 so it's a decade out and not in an anthology. Still it is close enough that it's worth mentioning. In 1983, a team of deeply pious scientists conducted a radical experiment in an undisclosed facility. The scientists had ...


4

Are you sure it’s not Michael Moorcock’s 1966 novella, Behold the Man? ‘Cause it sure sounds like it. Moorcock expanded it into a novel in 1969, but you would’ve read the novella if it was in an anthology. The protagonist is obsessed with Jesus, travels back and discovers that Mary’s son is pretty much a drooling idiot, so he performs all the stuff that ...


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