Hot answers tagged

103

Where did it come from? The spiders that live in the brain of Azrak-Hamway Incorporated. StarTrek.com has a hilarious article talking about some of the insane licensed toys produced by AHI and Remco Toys (who AHI bought in 1974); the helmet came from them (emphasis theirs): [T]he Enco Company must have drawn inspiration from the 1969 Remco Star Trek ...


96

There isn't one, but there doesn't need to be. Vulcans as a culture may have adopted Surak's teachings of emotional control, but it's still something that has to be learned. This was demonstrated in a flashback to a young Tuvok in VOY 5x13, Gravity, where he has yet to learn control of his emotions. Using Tuvok as an example, it appears that at least some ...


65

I believe Sir, he's dead already. covers it. Once Captain Spock had finished with the repairs, nothing could be done to save him. Had Spock wanted to, he could have come back out of the chamber through the same swivelling radiation lock by which he entered. However, doing so would only endanger anyone who tried to come to Spock's aid, because by that ...


60

My suggestion from the comments above was simply that they were conducting an experiment on him. There was no malicious motivation for their behaviour - they simply didn't care about their test subject at all. Their hypothesis was that as a half-Vulcan he would be unable to control his emotional state as well as a full Vulcan. They were trying to test this ...


47

He is not the first Vulcan in Starfleet. Star Trek Enterprise by itself puts a nail in the coffin: near the end of the third season, when the ship returns to Earth after having stopped the Xindi attack, T'Pol is formally inducted into Starfleet and given the rank of Commander. In TOS, there was also a clear indication: in "The Immunity Syndrome", USS ...


42

Spock's full name is S'chn T'gai Spock. From memory-beta: Spock's full name was revealed in TOS novel: Ishmael. In TOS episode: "This Side of Paradise", Spock said that his full name was unpronounceable to Humans. It is revealed in a TOS novel called Ishmael. Apart from this reference, and the name being deemed unpronounceable in a TOS episode, ...


42

A piece of trivia states that because of the episode being the second pilot, the 'colors had not been finalized'. The familiar colors and positions of the crew had not yet been finalized when this second pilot was shot. The tunics for operations crew are beige instead of red. The locations of the helmsman and navigator are reversed (when Kirk is facing ...


39

As best that I recall (yes; I'm old enough that I remember these actually being sold and worn) -- Marketing; that's it. Spock did wear headgear a number of times (Perhaps best remembered from when his brain was stolen; picture below, but he also wore a well-remembered headband in The Voyage Home, as well as a Hood, a bucket type hat, a fedora, a Nazi helmet ...


37

The only non-mental evidence of his human heritage mentioned in the "Physiology" section of his Memory Alpha article is a scene from the episode "Journey to Babel", in which his father Sarek needs a blood transfusion and there is the following discussion: SAREK: My blood type is T-negative. Somewhat rare, even for a Vulcan. MCCOY: Yes, I'd say that'...


36

This answer involves a speculative leap. After landing on the planet, the escape pod informs Kirk of the location of the outpost: COMPUTER VOICE: Location: Delta Vega. Class-M planet. Unsafe. There is a Starfleet outpost fourteen kilometers to the northwest. Kirk has been walking towards that outpost when, chased by the local fauna, he stumbles into a ...


33

Star Trek’s Mr. Spock is not the exemplar of logic and rationality. Instead, he is a “straw man” of rationality used to show that human emotion and irrationality are better than logic. His role is to show that emotion and irrationality is superior. He gives extremely exact probabilities which never pan out. Being better at decision-making than Spock is ...


29

Vulcans affect emotionlessness and logic because at their core they are so turbulent that their unchecked emotions nearly caused the destruction of their species. It's worth remembering that Romulans are a splinter group of Vulcans that refused to accept that. Even when Vulcans are acting with logic and emotion, it is not because they do not feel emotion, ...


27

First off, there are a few invertebrates with copper-based blood. It's not necessarily green, I believe it's actually blue for some. Second, it only has to be a dominant trait. It may mean that he does have some Terran hemoglobin in his system, but the corresponding Vulcan gene hijacks the cellular machinery and doesn't let the other recessive gene to ...


26

Why Dr Spock? Dr Spock was a real person, an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the best-sellers of all time. This Benjamin Spock, unlike Star-Trek Spock, is usually referred to as "Dr Spock" (although the title seems to be that of a medical doctor rather than a PhD graduate). Quoting from Wikipedia (sourced ...


26

The episode you are thinking of is TOS: Journey to Babel and the pet is question was a sehlat named I-Chaya. Here is a picture from TAS: Yesteryear, in which we finally meet the creature: A lower-quality image to show the creature's scale at the time of its death: Here is the dialogue you are remembering: MCCOY: Spock, I've always suspected that you ...


26

Scott had already stated that anyone entering the chamber would be dead in under a minute. "It isna possible, sir!" Mr. Scott cried. "The radiation level is far too high; i' ha' already burned out the electronics o' the repair robot, and if ye went in in a suit 'twould freeze for the same reason! A person unprotected wouldna last a minute!" Star Trek:...


25

Although this seems to have been an intentionally obscure throwaway line in the original show (something for the fans to chew over) in an edition of the TNG Comic from 1990 Trek Editor Robert Greenberger confirmed that Roddenberry was intending for the line to refer to Spock's wedding; Q. In the episode "Sarek" it was mentioned that Picard was at his son'...


23

Spock was on trial and couldn't be expected to cooperate. His testimony about the state of Pike's mind wouldn't be trustworthy, anyway. Mendez was a projection from Talos IV and so wouldn't suggest anything the Talosians didn't want nor would he allow the mind meld even if Kirk suggested it. The information stream from Talos IV was at least something all ...


23

Although the film doesn't make it immediately obvious, the reality is that Spock and the Enterprise crew have already travelled through time on at least two other occasions using the "Slingshot effect"; once by accident (in TOS : "Tomorrow is Yesterday" when the crew inadvertantly stray into the gravity well of a black star) and once on purpose (in TOS: "...


21

Spock's pet sehlat, I-Chaya, was part of a story told twice in Star Trek canon. I-Chaya appeared on screen in the animated episode Yesteryear: The story was repeated, from Sarek's perspective, in the Next Generation episode Unification I. I-Chaya's role is omitted. Sehlats appear to have been the only Vulcan pets named in main canon. T'Pol also had one in ...


20

It is implied that most Vulcan's katra remains with whatever Vulcan receives it - it is treated as a part of their soul, given to others to be remembered by. A piece of them will be with their closest loved one (the intended recipient of the katra) for the rest of that Vulcan's life. This is evidenced by the fact that what Spock regains is NOT complete - ...


20

The answer to this question lies at the heart of the contradictions and selfdelusions of Vulcan society. They claim that their are beings of pure logic without emotion yet that logic is built on a foundation of destructive emotion. They claim that they value science and knowledge, yet purposefully neglect or actively suppress research into aspects of ...


19

Where No Man Has Gone Before is the second pilot of Star Trek, produced before any of the other aired episodes apart from segments of The Menagerie, which contains parts of the original pilot, The Cage. Many details of the series had not been finalized, to wit: costumes and makeup. Spock wearing command gold is not such a big oversight - while he was head ...


18

Whether he will is answerable only by waiting for the next movie. Whether he can is another question (and the one I'll attempt to answer). The events of the J.J. Abrams movie created a new timeline, so many of the events we've seen in the original timeline will no longer occur. But we've also seen plenty of events that were set in motion by things that ...


16

Star Trek (2009), Star Trek into Darkness (2013), and Star Trek Beyond (2016) occur in an alternate timeline / reality - so there are two different Spocks. "Old Spock" is from the 'original' timeline and has journeyed via artificial black hole to an alternate universe. The alternate reality was a new reality created when a temporal incursion caused by ...


16

Out-of-universe answer: This uniform style was only used for this episode and "The Cage", and Spock isn't the only character wearing the "wrong" color - note that Scott and Sulu are not in their "normal" colors either: Spock's makeup style had not been finalized by this episode, either; the brows are a bit more severe, his complexion is more sallow, etc. ...


15

The Genesis team didn't have the problem of runaway catastrophic evolution in the cave (where Khan left them to die), so perhaps the runaway effect was caused by too high a concentration of protomatter. Somewhere between the size of the cave and the size of a planet a tipping point was reached. When Spock was moved a large distance from the concentration ...


15

I hazard that he was not. In the Original Series episode "Immunity Syndrome", we have the USS Intrepid. We are told the Starfleet vessel was crewed exclusively by Vulcans. To have 430-ish Vulcans, from the Captain down to the Assistant Dishwasher, would suggest several of his people were ahead of Spock in processing through the Academy to serve.


14

It's a suprisingly common expression. Spock, The EMH, Tuvok, Janeway, Chakotay and Torres all use it in precisely the same way, usually without irony when confronted by something genuinely new and interesting. With regards to Vulcan use of the term, Tuvok seems to be the only other Vulcan we see using it. In the Voyager episode "Gravity", he says it in an ...


14

Yes, it's absolutely possible for Spock, and any other alien hybrid, to have children. Several relevant episodes of Enterprise are referenced in the comments, which I want to expand on. The episode Future Tense revolves around the Enterprise crew discovering a ship from the future. The pilot's corpse is found inside, and Doctor Phlox determines that it was ...


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