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44

The shields are definitely up, but the swarm ships seem to be completely unaffected. As far as can be told, there's no explanation offered why this is the case but the Conn Officer seems quite surprised that they're useless, suggesting that they should have proven more resilient. Chekov: Shield frequencies are having no effect, Captain.


42

Seatbelts feature in a number of Star Trek properties that significantly pre-date Star Trek Beyond. They were seen in a deleted scene from Star Trek: Nemesis In Star Trek Into Darkness Shuttlecraft also have them in various episodes of TNG The Animated Series (TAS: Once Upon a Planet) during a gravity loss scenario. You can also see that Archer's chair (...


42

No. The prison guard in Star Trek III: Also, from TOS, The Cage we see a hat, though do not see anyone wearing it: Finally (and possibly slightly less canonically), these must be Starfleet issue since the whole bridge crew has the same hat: (This is a joke. This is a well-known photoshopped image. Discussion of it is on this question.) Images courtesy ...


34

This is a graphical depiction of how the two objects would look side-by-side, based on the best canonical evidence we have about their sizes. According the the concept artist for Star Trek Beyond, Sean Hargreaves, the outer diameter of Yorktown Station is 40 miles. Q. Do you remember how big Yorktown is supposed to be. Sean Hargreaves: About 40 ...


31

As I haven't seen the film itself, just the trailer, I'm making assumptions on that one (although I don't think they would change). Shields in Star Trek reduce the damage that beam and projectile weapons (phasers, disruptors, torpedoes) do to ships, and negate damage from small asteroids by pushing them aside (navigational deflectors). The swarm ships, ...


31

That all depends on your definition of "Seatbelts". The first bridge seat restraint system was seen in Star Trek: The Motion Picture. On the Captain's chair, the seat arms folded down over the lap during emergencies.


30

Do headbands count as hats? Nog was seen wearing a Ferengi-style headband (earband?) in several episodes. Not sure exactly which episodes these screenshots are from, though. As a cadet: As an ensign: From Memory Alpha, here's a photo of a flag officer from the same era in the Kelvin timeline as in your original question wearing a cap in a different style:...


27

According to Sean Hargreaves, the designer of the Yorktown, each arm is intended to be 17.5 miles long and they open into the interior ball. This means the radius of the station is a little bit more than 17.5 miles or 28.16 km. The death star, is said to have a diameter of 87 miles (DS1), or 99 miles(DS2). Both are significantly bigger than the Yorktown. ...


22

He's not thrilled Takei had quite a lot to say about it in a 2016 interview with The Hollywood Reporter, and in a post1 on his Facebook page shortly after that interview went live; highlights from both include: In general, he's happy to see an openly gay character, and he's "flattered" that they made Sulu gay as an homage to him: "I'm delighted that ...


21

There is a line in the movie mentioning the ineffectiveness of the shields against the swarm ships — annoyingly I can’t remember it, but it is mentioned in this Reddit post, which claims the line mentions shield frequencies. As you noted, there’s precedent from Generations that shields can be ineffective if the enemy knows their frequency. As you’ll also ...


20

It's been officially confirmed that the Franklin predates Archer's Enterprise, see this article: And if you think this is just our speculation, worry not: we got a note from Dylan Highsmith, one of the lead picture editors on STAR TREK BEYOND, about this very issue. If you want the official explanation on the Franklin and it’s warp factor: it was a M....


18

The quote from the movie is that the planet that Krall/Edison crash-landed on contained a "drone workforce", presumably some sort of (biological?) robots which would explain the sheer quantity of men and ships at his disposal. Edison: The indigenous race abandoned this planet long ago. They left behind sophisticated mining equipment and a drone ...


17

No, you've not gone boss-eyed. His birth and death-dates are actually pretty confusing. Spock was born in 2230 in the prime timeline. He lived until 2387 within the prime timeline and then traveled back in time to 2258 where he lived until his death in 2263 within the new reboot timeline. He therefore died at the chronological age of 162. Had he not ...


17

IN UNIVERSE If you look at the rank insignia, Kirk has reverted to the Captain's insignia, rather than the Admirals insignia. This places it after the events of Star Trek IV, as Kirk had not been demoted yet. Combine this with Uhura's distinctive hair (As noted by @NKCampbell in comments and excellent answer), and you can place it after IV and before VI (As ...


16

The Xindi and Romulan wars — he is correct about their toll Krall is referring to two bloody campaigns in Earth's pre-Federation history. Xindi campaign At the start of the third season of Enterprise, the Xindi, a group of five different species from a single planet in the unexplored Delphic Expanse, had used a prototype weapon to attack Earth. The ...


16

Star Trek (2009), Star Trek into Darkness (2013), and Star Trek Beyond (2016) occur in an alternate timeline / reality - so there are two different Spocks. "Old Spock" is from the 'original' timeline and has journeyed via artificial black hole to an alternate universe. The alternate reality was a new reality created when a temporal incursion caused by ...


15

My take on it was that Jaylah was hiding the USS Franklin not just to disguise its existence, but to disguise that she's spent hundreds of man-hours trying to put it back into into a flyable condition. This might include stuff that could be seen from the air (hull repairs and so forth). Cloaking it would make it look like it had disappeared from view but ...


14

Unfortunately, your original assumption is incorrect. The ship that was destroyed was NCC-1701 not NCC-1701-A So, when the new ship is constructed at the end of ST:B IT was designated NCC-1701-A.


12

In short, yes and no. Manas and Kalara These two individuals are in fact the same species, and one that is seen extensively in the Trek franchise Jaylah Jaylah's species name has not yet been revealed. It has, however been confirmed that her character and iconic makeup (and by implication, her species) were invented specifically for the film and hasn't ...


11

The film's screenwriter Simon Pegg confirmed in an interview that her character is alive and well during the events of Star Trek Beyond, but that she's not on board the Enterprise. She's just...err...elsewhere. “With this it felt like we would under-serve her if we included her, she might end up feeling like she hadn’t been given the amount of screen-...


11

The most likely explanation seems to be that transporters are actively blocked from working in the core because of the potential for causing damage to systems that are vital to the Station's life support. Kirk: Mr Scott. Why's it [the core] still functional? Scott: I'm working on that Sir, but there are a bunch of security protocols for a system ...


10

Yes, it seems so. Krall explains that the original inhabitants of the planet left behind "technology" for extending life. Having seen the film twice now, I can say that it does seem that his suit contains this technology. For starters, Krall, Manas and Kalara and so Manas and Kalara also needed to extend their lives unnaturally using the alien technology....


10

The quote from the film is Kirk: Scotty, can you get this thing started? Scott: Started yes, Sir. Flying, that's a different thing. These old vessels, they were built in space. They were never supposed to take off from atmosphere. then Chekov: We have to achieve terminal velocity in order for the stabilizers to provide lift. Quite why this is ...


9

The Franklin does predate Archer's Enterprise. Beyond the warp 4 reference, there is Scotty's assertion that the transporters were only used for cargo, and that he had to upgrade them for human transport. The registry number can be explained away a couple of ways. Possibly, Starfleet reset the registry numbers for the introduction of the NX Class; Franklin ...


9

UPDATE: The answer below was based upon reasoning prior to the statement by Highsmith. See Hypnosifl's excellent answer for the final word! The Franklin does not predate Archer's Enterprise. It is seen in Beyond that the registry for the Franklin is NX-abc where abc is a 3-digit number, and so it was constructed further down the line than the Enterprise. ...


9

The reason is very likely the same reason as in the babylon 5 series (in universe at least): A commanding officer is a big fan of motorcycles / the old times and used all contacts he had to get one on board. Out of universe: Because the writers found it cool (at least that is my impression in both cases). Edit: Non motorcycle examples of this are archers ...


8

In ST3:The Search for Spock, the crew of the Excelsior use some kind of seat restraint just before they go to trans-warp.


8

In the introductory scene, we see other characters marveling at the station with only McCoy concerned about it; McCoy: [It] Looks like a damn snow-globe in space just waiting to break! The station is brand new, and apparently a technological marvel. Spock points out that it was constructed to avoid showing favoritism to new Federation planets in that ...


8

In the original timeline, although they did use metric units in the TNG era, during the TOS era they were still using non-metric units like miles and feet (suggesting either US customary units or imperial units), so it makes sense this would be true in about the same era in the Kelvin timeline. For example, here's a bit of dialogue from the transcript of the ...


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