130

The very short answer is that he doesn't need to scrub in. That's literally the point of this scene although I suspect looking at the comments on the internet that this was waaay too subtle for all but the nerdiest of Trek nerds to notice, let alone work out what was going on. Heck, even Kes doesn't notice or her next line would be something like... Kes: ...


60

Data's lack of emotions is intentional According to Lore, Dr. Soong deliberately left many features out of Data's programming in a bid to make him less threatening to humans. LORE: It would be foolish to underestimate you, brother. Yes, I lied when I said you were made first, but with good reason. Doctor Soong made me perfect in his first attempt. ...


31

They're different tech The important thing to recognise is that these are two vastly different pieces of technology, running on quite different hardware (one a Starfleet ship's computer and Hilo-emitters, the other a positronic brain). So there is a difference in programming them by virtue of their makeup. Intentional design The other factor and probably ...


25

TV Canon Within the main TV canon, the boy is never mentioned again, nor are there any obvious references within the episode to what happened or why he has a son other than that... "...it's a long story." EU canon A longer explanation is found within the short story "Eighteen Minutes" written by Terri Osborne and found in the Distant Shores anthology ...


21

Besides the answers already mentioned (Data being intentionally stripped of emotions and the Doctor being later technology), there's another aspect worth considering: that the Doctor does not truly have emotions. Judging by the Lewis Zimmerman we see in in the episode "Life Line", the Doctor was modeled after an irritable, sarcastic man. The Doctor's ...


20

No, I've never heard anything to indicate that the Doctor (VOY) has any connection to the Doctor (Doctor Who). The characters couldn't be more different - Doc (VOY) is placid and very tied to one location (sickbay, then Voyager). The Doctor is manic and travels constantly. The EMH was called 'Doctor' because that's what he was - he had an advanced ...


19

He does choose a name. Eventually. The Doctor's name is revealed in Endgame part 1, the penultimate episode of the series. Of course, this is the future timeline that Admiral Janeway comes from, and the events of Endgame may have changed the timeline so that the Doctor doesn't pick a name.


19

The Chief Medical Officer needs solid, documentable reasons and the support of other senior officers, and there may be consequences for the CMO if the decision to relieve the Captain is unsound. The extent to which the Chief Medical Officer can or cannot relieve the commanding officer of duty is discussed at length in a particular TNG episode, "Lonely Among ...


19

Yes, the Doctor is fully capable of olfactory detection. In the episode Future's End, Part II, the Doctor smells a tree, as referenced in the linked article. This is quite a sensible feature for a medical hologram to have, given that the capability exists. Many diseases have notable scents, and it would be useful for an emergency medical hologram to be ...


17

OghmaOsiris's comment about the Doctor's naïvety is probably the reason. The Doctor's original programming as an Emergency Medical Holographic program would not have included the concept of people taking advantage of him. He was always stored in the computer. The addition of holographic emitter allowed him new unexplored mobility. No doubt he eventually ...


17

As mentioned in the question, the Doctor is an Emergency Medical Hologram: The Emergency Medical Holographic program (EMH) was a sophisticated hologram developed in the early 2370s by Starfleet and used on most Federation starships in the late 24th century. It was designed to provide short-term advanced assistance during emergencies in sickbay to ...


16

I thought that it was Digital Restriction Management at work. It's probably much more pervasive in Voyager's time than even today and it wouldn't surprise me if even medical units and the military/Starfleet would not be exempt from this.


16

Just to add a little more to the mix. Out of universe, Data having no emotions gave the writers and story a place to explore emotions. Several times in TNG Data displays, what may be considered as, simple emotions. He has preferences, and most importantly desire. He is "fascinated" quite often and even displays sadness, angst, and hope. The trick is that ...


15

The holograms have the capability to draw upon the entire resources of the mainframe of the ship. We see this in the TNG episode, Ship in a Bottle, where Moriarty becomes self-aware. The programming of the ship mainframes is complex enough that it is apparently capable of creating self-aware AI. Housing that in a mobile brain is a hardware problem. In TNG'...


12

According to Star Trek technical manuals I've found, and other resources from various places, the Sick Bay systems are completely separate physically from the rest of the ship. It''s got its own power supply, it's got its own replicators, it's even got it's own Emergency Power. It is for all intents and purposes a complete separate system. The only reason ...


12

TLDR They don't worry about losing the medical expertise of the original Mark I Emergency Medical Hologram. The holomatrix for that entity is always safely ensconced in the computers in the sickbay, in its limited and unenlightened form. What they worry about losing is the added shell of information that has become the Doctor for the crew of Voyager. This ...


11

There is no in-universe explanation so the real reason is obviously that SciFi writers don't know the difference between software and hardware (or more likely are aware of the fact that viewers don't). One in-universe explanation I use to suspend disbelief is that Digital Restriction Management (DRM) is widely used in the Star Trek universe and that hence ...


10

tl;dr: Apples and oranges. There are several problems with this question. First, we've never discovered for sure that the EMH does "feel emotion". Right up to the end of the show, several characters (despite having become his "friend") still considered his personality a mere simulation, and a hearing in late Season 7 declined to confidently declare that he ...


9

In the third season episode "Darkling", the Doctor's program was infested by new behavioral subroutines. He was strong enough to grab a full-grown man and with one arm hold that man immobile for several seconds while the man's hand was being burned over a raging fire. This is much stronger than any single human of similar build. Tangling with the Doctor ...


9

The Doctor tried several names, but is not known to have settled on one in the primary timeline. Out of universe, his name in the early scripts was Zimmerman after Herman Zimmerman. In several early first-season Star Trek: Voyager scripts and during the pre-production phase, the character of The Doctor was referred to by name as Doc Zimmerman after ...


9

There's no canonical answer to this that I'm aware of. Speculatively however the answer could lie in the fact that by traveling on the Delta Flyer the Doctor was operating far outside of the environmental parameters that Dr Zimmerman ever anticipated. Since Transwarp velocities were not available (or anticipated to be available) when the Doctor's program ...


8

It is not specifically stated that the Doctor's technology is identical to holodeck technology. That said, there's ample evidence to support it - the holoprojectors in Voyager's medbay have been damaged multiple times, and replaced from spares. In the episode where the ship is slowly converted into a massive holodeck for war games (The Killing Game, season ...


8

It's an interesting question, and certainly wouldn't be the first questionable decision made by Captain Janeway. In fact, I like to think that when they returned to the Alpha Quadrant, Janeway spent the next week having to justify all the weird decisions in her logs. At any rate, the "who you are" comment by Janeway indicates that the Doctor has taken ...


8

They didn't beam him over. They transferred his program. I think the misunderstanding here has to do with the belief that he was beamed over. This wasn't the case: KIM: The holograms are tapping into the Sickbay emitters. They're trying to transfer the Doctor's program off the ship! What they accomplished was more akin to hacking into Voyager's ...


7

When Q came aboard Voyager in Voy: Death Wish he said humans would be in the Delta Quadrant in a few hundred years. This means the Doctor wouldn't have had to go that far to run into a Starfleet ship. QUINN: I, I'm not sure how. Humans. Humans. Who would have more recent experience with humans? Q: What have you done now, Q? Well, now, isn't this ...


7

The EMH doctor activated in the Kyrian museum isn't mentioned in any further TV episodes or films. There are, however a couple of fiction sources (non-canon) that relate to fate of the "Backup EMH" In Personal Log by Kevin Killiany in "Strange New Worlds IV" (an anthology of short Trek stories) The Doctor encounters a number of species mentioned in the ...


7

Obviously his fans are treating him as if he is an organic which has limited memory, calculating ability, or limitations to his energy / waking / regeneration span. On the other hand, I do not believe that there is a canonical answer as to whether the EMH has access to pure math functions or the ability to write and execute a recursive algorithm. B'elana ...


7

The virtual reality environment in which the clown operated and the hostages were held was populated by characters created from the peoples' bioneural feedback, but it was still just a computer-generated virtual reality environment. I can't imagine the crew would have had any trouble importing the Doctor, and I don't see why he'd need 'a brain' in there any ...


6

Consider the following dialogue from the episode itself, involving the EMH, the publisher, Janeway, and Admiral Paris: ADMIRAL PARIS [on screen]: I had the dubious privilege of playing a new holonovel apparently written by your EMH. I'm surprised that you would allow the Doctor to discredit your crew like this. JANEWAY: He's still making revisions. ...


6

Lacking any in-universe stated explanation (besides "poor writing"), we are forced to speculate that what are being called "menial tasks" here, like scrubbing plasma conduits and dilithium mining actually do require a level of technical intelligence that is not easily achieved with conventional AI (i.e. standard computer cores). As demonstrated by the EMH (...


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