41

The film's official novelisation contains a version of events that includes a translation of the probe's conversation with the whales. Apologies for the length of the quote: [Probe] Why did you remain silent for so long? They [The whales] tried to explain, but it reacted in surprise and disbelief. Where were you? it asked. We were not here, ...


34

Does momentum conservation not apply to transporter operation in the Star Trek Universe? From what we have been shown, apparently not. Given the transporters already violate so many of our current laws of physics including: mass-to-energy conversion and back again, quantum data storage and information manipulation, not to mention manipulation of ...


32

I'm not sure which order they come, but as far as publishing dates, the first victory was in The Bottom Line, which was printed in "Strange New Worlds III". This was the more interesting of the two -- purely tactical as far as I can tell. Although whether he won or not is somewhat dubious. With the tractor beam, he slingshots the Kobayashi Maru towards the ...


30

Given that the location of the USS Enterprise seems to be at least slightly classified (and when they're on fleet maneuvers, very classified), you'd probably need to send your letter in electronic form to Starfleet Headquarters to be forwarded onward the next time the ship makes contact and downloads a message bundle. We see several examples of this in the ...


27

It appears that there was a sequel novel Probe that gives some more background about the "Whale Probe". Kirk and his crew later discover that the Probe was created by beings that resembled Earth cetaceans Spock successfully mind melds with the probe, learning that it did not seek to be destructive to other races, instead they were so different from ...


25

Let's start with the most important tidbit of information: Star Trek: TNG novels are not canon. The stories you read in the novels are not considered "this is how things are in the Star Trek universe." They're great stories, so by all means enjoy them. However, the various shows and movies don't depend on them in anyway, and different novels need not refer ...


21

Within the TV series and films, there are no instances of existing UFP members being ejected due to their actions although there is a mention of Turkana IV withdrawing their membership after a bitter civil war. Additionally, certain planets were annexed during the Dominion War (such as Betazed) but their status as members remained and they operated with "...


20

But they are confused sometimes! There are several instances when the computer mistakes a comment not directed at the computer as a command. There seems to be a heuristic identifying commands but it's not perfect. PARIS: Are you saying there's no more story? COMPUTER: Affirmative. PARIS: This is someone's idea of a practical joke, right? ...


18

Within the TV series, no. Janeway mentions it once, in VOY 4x21, The Omega Directive, as another technology deemed too dangerous and powerful to keep around. It was, however, brought up again in the novels, according to Memory Beta: There was a series of TNG novels called The Genesis Wave, and a sequel to them called Genesis Force. According to the ...


18

My name is Brian, and I'm the community manager for Artemis. I'd like to clarify: Artemis was started about three years ago and the Author, Thom Robertson, is not affiliated with any Star Trek clubs or fandom. While Artemis clearly has its roots in classic Star Trek, it was quickly adopted by a small (but growing!) fanbase, who suggested changes, changes ...


16

There is no "standard" canon defined by a central authority for Star Trek, like the way the Lucas Empire Disney Empire defines one for Star Wars. Having said that, there's a "commonly accepted" situation described in detail on Memory Alpha Canon page: The Star Trek canon is generally defined as all live-action television series and feature films released ...


16

Yes and no. The closest we come in the main canon (e.g. TV and Films) is the TOS episode "Obsession" where we encounter a creature known as a "Dikironium Cloud". It certainly meets most of the main criteria you've described... GARROVICK: Sir, that thing only feeds on blood. KIRK: Garrovick, get back to the ship. Tell them to prepare to detonate. ...


15

The Universal Translator is a plot device. Meaning it works when writers want it to and fails when they don't want it to. They are unfortunately inconsistent in their depictions of such events. As a point of reference, video games, particularly ones which feature the Star Trek Universe, are almost never considered canon. Differences in video game timelines ...


15

Within the Trek universe, machine intelligence is a regular feature. That said, there doesn't seem to be a specific instance when the "Turing threshold" was reached, nor is it generally used as a measure (as evidenced by the complete lack of a mention in any of the Trek TV episodes). In the books it's mentioned on several occasions; In Typhon Pact, Riker ...


15

Once the whales are brought back from the past, they are able to communicate with the probe and send it on its way. Creating this sequence created some behind-the-scene's controversy. Nimoy explains: Morrison’s response had a wonderful, profound effect on my thinking about these issues. (And upon the Star Trek IV script, in which Spock tell McCoy, “There ...


14

(Old) Spock's flashback scenes in Star Trek occur after Nemesis. Depending how you define Canon: The comic book Star Trek: Countdown occurs between Nemesis and the film above, and is endorsed by Orci. Starting with Death in Winter, the books continued to explore the post-Nemesis world.


14

It's brought up in the novel Federation, when The man is initially confused how he got onboard the Enterprise, and is frustrated by the crewman who just keeps telling him he was 'transported'. He even guesses that the Enterprise may have used some secret military technology, which explains why the crewman is being so unhelpful in defining how he was ...


14

Peter David gave the character a major role in his New Frontier novels. She serves as Excalibur's First Officer and it is revealed that she had a romantic relationship with the ship's captain back at the academy.


13

Within the TV and Film Series, there's no further mention of Wesley's Nanites. The last we see of them, they've been abandoned on Kavis Alpha IV. In the wider trek canon (books, etc), we meet them again briefly in Immortal Coil where they're referenced as being part of a wider pan-civilisational grouping of robot and machine intelligences living in and ...


12

The Aperture Science Gun and Star Trek teleportation have fundamentally different mechanics. The portals created by the Aperture Science Gun allow objects to physically move from one location to another without transversing the space between these locations. The teleportation technology used by Star Trek involves scanning you, destroying your body, and ...


12

The Talosians never appear again in the film or TV canon but they do appear in a variety of Trek Books; In the short story "The Greater Good" by Margaret Wander Bonanno, contained in the anthology 'Shards and Shadows' a mirror James T. Kirk returns to Talos IV and ordered that its surface be leveled, annihilating the Talosians for the good of the Empire. ...


12

The Voyager episode Tuvix deals with a transporter accident which combines the most annoying parts of Neelix and Tuvok into a single person called Tuvix. It deals with the ethical ramifications of having to kill Tuvix to restore Neelix and Tuvok. For once in Star Trek, there's no neat solution. I'm going to go beyond the bounds of the question, beyond ...


12

TV Canon Canonically, the events of DS9: Defiant were the last we know of Tom's life. As you've already mentioned, we see him being shipped off to Lazon Two then he's never mentioned again. EU Canon There are a considerable number of EU books, comics, and even video games that follow the life of Thomas Riker beyond the end of that episode. According to ...


12

The Three-Minute Universe - Book 41 of the series, which I originally found by my search taking me here. The Sackers may be the most hated race in the galaxy, so repugnant that their mere appearance makes most Federation citizens ill. That hatred runs both ways, and now the Sackers have stolen a powerful new device that they use to imperil the rest of the ...


11

Excluding 'The Menagerie: Parts I & II' (which includes archival footage of 'The Cage') a number of actors appeared in both the pilot episode and other episodes of Star Trek. Leonard Nimoy continued to play Mr. Spock in TOS, TNG and the subsequent films. Majel Barrett played a host of characters in TOS, TNG, DS9 and Voyager including the voice of the ...


11

Definitely not. If it did, then even people standing still on the surface of a planet being transported to the ship would be hurled at high speed in some direction if the ship transporting them up was not moving perfectly in the direction of the planet's orbit. This would clearly be highly impractical, so it must have been designed to account for this.


11

The philosophy of transportation is discussed at length in the very early (maybe the first?) tie-in novel Spock Must Die by James Blish. The plot revolves around an evil duplicate of Spock created by a transporter experiment. Unfortunately my copy is 1500 miles away right now or I'd quote some. Here's some synopsis from Wikipedia: Doctor Leonard McCoy ...


11

From Memory Alpha Riker is promoted to Admiral in the Star Trek: The Fall miniseries, as Fleet Admiral Leonard James Akaar suspected a conspiracy in the upper echelons of Starfleet Command and needed someone in the admiralty that he knew he could trust. Despite his new position, Riker retains the Titan as his flagship, and attempts to go on missions in it ...


11

For completeness, I do have a copy of the novel Probe mentioned by N_Soong in a comment. What it has to say is fairly little, but consistent with the STIV novelization. From the prologue: In the waters of hundreds of worlds it had found primitives who held the promise that, in another million years, they might be able to Speak, might become capable of ...


11

In Star Trek IV, a whaling ship in 1984 attempts to fire a harpoon and, to the shock of its crew, their harpoon bounces off of a cloaked Klingon Bird of Prey (skip to 2:15) captained by James T. Kirk, which then proceeds to decloak and chase the whalers away. In this case, it appears that Kirk wants to get in the way of the harpoon, essentially using the ...


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