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To expand on @Nerrolken's first point, note that Picard explicitly asks for the date they went to, not the distance they were sent back in time. This suggests that his concern isn't getting back, or judging the capacity of Borg time travel - he's worried that there's something specific they've been sent back to. In that case, he needs a date that he can ...


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The writers needed to incorporate the Gregorian date so that viewers could quickly understand the time period. If they used a star date, it would not convey the quick, intended information required for the scene. It was done to provide a ground for the plot without confusing viewers. This way anyone watching the movie knew the time and date without having to ...


1

Given how readily Mendrossen lied about Sarek's condition, I'd say he was not a strict follower of Surak. Sarek likely had him on staff partialy because it was logical to have a staffer who could easily lie for the sake diplomacy when needed.


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Could it be when Gary Seven was initially plucked from our history around 4000 BC. Perhaps his presence in the universe setup our present reality. Without him, his prodigy would never have an impact on our world. Also, who's to say his presence on his hosting planet before being returned to Earth didn't prevent an eventual invasion of Earth which may ...


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The main thing with the rest of the crew is they do not understand to the extent of which Picard or Guinan truly hate them. In "Best of Both Worlds", the crew's mission was to stop the Borg and, if possible, get Picard back. That was their mission, and they cared more about achieving those goals vs seeing the Borg suffer or having a personal hatred toward ...


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From a canonical point of view of TV shows and movies, the question as to who build the Sphere was not answered. I do recall the Sphere being mentioned/used in Star Trek Online game detailing its history etc., but personally I hadn't played that part myself as of yet so I wouldn't know of the said details. That said, Star Trek Online is NOT considered canon....


0

Dr. Phlox of "Enterprise" let all the Valakians die on an entire planet by withholding the cure to the plague affecting them. The episode's title was "Dear Doctor". Captain Janeway of "Voyager" gives the Borg the means of committing genocide on Species 8472. I'd say it was a toss up between those two,


11

Picard is easy: the Borg violated him personally, not friends of his. As for Guinan, the scope is very different. There were (according to Memory Alpha) 11,000 casualties at Wolf 359. Compare that to (emphasis mine) Around 2265, while Guinan wasn't present, this species was the victim of a major attack by the Borg, with all but a handful of El-Aurians ...


12

On Q's second visit to the Enterprise, he tells a complete untruth. PICARD: Pay off your wager. Q: I recall no wager! TNG: Hide and Q During his third visit, he lies again since (we later learn) humanity has remained on trial throughout the entire voyage of the Enterprise-D RIKER: The good times? The first time we met you, you put us on ...


1

The thing is, Borg are just being economical, shields use lots of energy, they don't want to waste it by constantly holding up energy field on every ship and every individual drone.


25

Because they value resources over drones. While it's true that the Borg adapt to phaser frequency, they would rather lose a few drones than waste the energy and resources to constantly have defenses up. The Borg have shown time, and time again that they don't care how many of them die, as long as they get what they want. In fact, in the Voyager episode ...


31

Because the borg adapt to a frequency Star Trek shields work on a frequency, and once you know that frequency, you can alter your weapons to bypass those shields, which is why you'll often hear characters calling to 'remodulate shields'. Borg adaptation works in the exact opposite fashion, instead of having a frequency you need to bypass, they adapt to your ...


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"Tapestry" was not intended by the writers or producers as a comedy, though it certainly has light-hearted moments. Writer Ronald D. Moore explained about his choice to set the episode's flashbacks when he did: [Picard's stabbing] was an interesting little story about him. That story, to me, said a lot about Picard's character – that he was a different ...


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As others have said, "Make it so" and "Number One" orginiate from Royal Navy slang. In many Gene Roddenberry and Patrick Stewart interviews, Raddenberry says that Horatio Hornblower was the inspiration behind much of the "Star Trek Captain" archetype, even for the original series but probably more so TNG. It seems most likely to me then that the use of ...


5

I'll expand on the point I think Don is making. Humans are, on average, slightly less dense than freshwater; about 1-2% less. 997kg/m^3 vs 985. Data not only sinks in freshwater, but he's dense enough to comfortably walk on the bottom (Insurrection). Since Data is the same volume as a human he must weigh more to be more dense. At 180cm (Brent Spiner's ...


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Given Data's size and a density that causes him to immediately sink he must be significantly north of 100 kilos.


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Approximately 100 kg (= 220 lbs.) according to his 'mother'. DATA: My -- childhood? JULIANA: (laughing) That's what I called it. You were like a baby at first -- a hundred kilogram baby, but still... TNG: Inheritance This tallies with his official fact file on the StarTrek.com website, although this is likely a case of the tail (TNG: ...


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This is addressed in the non-canon book "The Light Fantastic" by Jeffery Lang ...complicating Data's life is an unexpected nemesis from years ago on the U.S.S. Enterprise - the holographic criminal Professor James Moriarty. Long believed to be imprisoned in a memory solid, Moriarty has created a siphon into the "real" world as a being of light and thought....


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Main Canon Within the main canon, Moriarty's "ship in a bottle" is never mentioned again after TNG: Ship in a Bottle, although the events of the episode (as an instructive warning) do receive a very brief and tangential reference in VOY: Alter Ego CHAKOTAY: Most likely a sentient computer programme. I checked the Starfleet database. This kind of thing ...


0

It is flimsy logic for any to suggest that the previous ruling had applied only to Data. When first contact with other species was made, and agreements reached, did they then say, "Now we must test every single one of you on your planet to make sure they are sapient, too?" No, they did not. And were we to imagine that Data and Data alone had been granted ...


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KURN: I find the constraints a bit difficult to conform to. Just a short while ago, I had to stop myself from killing Commander Riker. I believe he was trying to communicate the crew's sense of discomfort with my style of command. Under different circumstances, I would consider that a challenge to my authority. PICARD: One of the aims of the exchange ...


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