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113

The short answer is that it seems to be standard policy for Starfleet personnel to transport with both hands free, facing the front of the transporter. There are a few instances in Enterprise, Voyager and TNG where the crew beam into hostile situations with their phasers drawn or standing in a circle (or both) but these are very much the exception rather ...


85

Of course for all things Star Trek Memory Alpha has the answers. Regarding transporter pads: The transporters installed on Earth's NX-class starships featured one large circular pad that took up the entire platform. It was large enough to transport two to three people, provided they stood close together. By the 23rd century, Federation transporter ...


78

Out of universe, having made a few basic films, I would imagine that the neutral pose would have allowed for them to make the transition from one location to the other more convincing and believable to the viewer. I also think they probably reused transporter effects, so having a similar pose each time would have allowed them to save money.


67

Your basic assumption is correct. The transporter is "potentially" one of the most dangerous technologies the Federation and its allies could ever have. You could: transport Marines from one ship to another killing crew/disrupting systems (acceptable) transport biogenic weapons lethal to organic lifeforms (frowned upon) transport photon torpedoes or other ...


66

According to this earlier answer, which quotes the TNG Technical Manual, replicators need raw materials. For instance, raw stock for food replicators is stored in the form of a sterilized organic particulate suspension that has been formulated to statistically require the least quantum manipulation to replicate most finished foodstuffs. Hence, there is ...


56

Star Trek embraces whatever philosophy is required to tell the current story. In the TOS episode "The Lights of Zetar" Enterprise encounters extant members of a dead civilization who existed for millennia as acorporeal minds searching for a suitable body in which to live out the remainder of their corporeal lives. This is an example of Cartesian or ...


55

Per the Memory Alpha Transporter Section on Accidents there is no occasion listed in which there was an accidental beaming into another object. That said, the closest such accident I would suggest would be the following: In 2151, Crewman Ethan Novakovich was beamed back from the face of a planet later known as Archer IV by the still-experimental ...


44

Because it isn't necessary. Intraship transport is relegated to medical and security emergencies. There are a limited number of transporters available and such energy is more vital to other services on the ship such as shields or the warp engines. Despite the relative abundance of energy in the Federation universe, it still costs energy to convert people ...


43

It is. Voyager used the transporters once to beam a photon torpedo right on board a Borg vessel. It was ... efficient.


37

Replicators have certain limitations. They can't create: Antimatter Dilithium Latinum Living organism As for the living organisms, Star Trek: The Next Generation Technical Manual states that: Though the replicators use a form of transporter technology, it's at such a low resolution that creating living tissue is a physical impossibility. As for the ...


36

The Next Generation episode Realm of Fear has Lieutenant Barclay see something during transport: During transport, Barclay has an awful vision of a worm-like creature swimming in the matter stream and biting his arm. During the episode, his view of being transported is shown:


36

In the TNG episode "The Schizoid Man" (season 2), an away team was beamed to a planet while the Enterprise was either still using warp power or had briefly dropped out of warp long enough to use the transporter. I forget the exact details but, after the away team arrives, Counselor Troi said something like, "For a moment I thought I was in that wall over ...


33

Medical procedures were explicitly done by transporter a handful of times, although none of them are really surgeries. By the TNG era, transporters had safety features in them. One of those was the biofilter. Every time someone transports, biological contaminants are removed from their stream. Although this is not a standard surgery, where organs are ...


30

I can't remember ever hearing an "official" explanation, but I could imagine several possibilities in-universe: Maybe a "standard pose" made it easier on the system, sort of like reading stock phrases to help a voice-to-text system today. More complex poses might have led to longer transporter "render" times, higher chance of transport error, or some other ...


30

In the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Deadlock", a baby was delivered by "fetal transport", literally beaming the fetus out of the womb to save its mother from being gored to death by the half-Ktarian baby's cranial ridges. So using the transporter as a magical device to reach inside a living body is certainly possible during the TNG era; Voyager was ...


28

A little bit from Memory Alpha to provide background for my reasoning: A typical transport sequence began with a coordinate lock, during which the destination was verified and programmed, via the targeting scanners. Obtaining or maintaining a transporter lock enables the transporter operator to know the subject's location, even in motion, allowing ...


25

The possibility is mentioned: In "The Cage" ONE: Now, you all know the situation. We're hoping to transport down inside the Talosian community. SPOCK: If our measurements and readings are an illusion also, one could find oneself materialised inside solid rock. ONE: Nothing will be said if any volunteer wants to back out. Repeated in "The Menagerie ...


22

The season seven episode of DS9 - Field of Fire - has a twist.


21

Sorry for the long answer, but I have a long quotation that's quite on target and I'm trying to include all the facts that I found that pertain to your question. I'm going to my source for this, one I've cited here before, the Star Trek: The Next Generation Writers' Technical Manual, Fourth Season Edition. This was sent to me directly, in a pitch package ...


21

Starfleet vessels are just too small to merit the expenditure of energy on site-to-site transporters when simple turbolifts are sufficient. Star Trek production illustrator Doug Drexler, when discussing the next (next) generation of Starfleet vessels identified that the Enterprise-J would use transporters as the primary method of moving people around. He ...


21

We know from the film itself that the tank had sufficient volume to contain 400 tonnes of water as well as two large whales. What's not immediately obvious is that the tank is only half full, at least according to the original film script. 218 EXT. OCEAN - UNDERWATER - ILM ELEMENTS George and Gracie, moving slowly through the deep, begin to BEAM OUT.....


20

You're basically replacing one problem with one bigger problem. Surgery is a complex thing, but it's a 400-year-old proven technique that has been extremely enhanced by the available technology. Such technology allows the Federation's medics (and those of other spacefaring cultures) to isolate a problem and perform precision surgery on just that particular ...


19

Yes. In the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Ferengi Love Songs" FCA agent Brunt beams into Quark's closet on the Ferengi homeworld. On a chain attached to his collar, Brunt wears a bar of gold-pressed latinum. There is other, circumstantial evidence. It seems unlikely that ultra-capitalist Quark travels without any currency on him, yet he was beamed ...


19

First, transports take 2-3 seconds to complete dematerialization, and a few more for materialization. We wouldn't see the crew fade in/out during the glowy parts otherwise. Second, there's this quote from Star Trek: Enterprise 1x04, Strange New World: Reed: "There's a problem, sir. There's contaminants in the matter stream. The phase discriminator ...


19

This probably has more to do with the limitations of the primitive special effects used in the original series more than anything else. I'm sure having the actors stand as still as possible with their arms tightly pressed against their bodies was preferred stance for post processing. This probably continued on even as the technology improved because it was ...


19

We regularly see characters beam up and down while carrying equipment and even organic life forms without getting molecularly fused to them, so the transporter can clearly deal with these situations. Technically, the very scene you're referring to is effectively the proof that this is not a big deal in-universe. We know they wouldn't get fused together ...


18

Aside from cultural formality and security concerns(especially with unknown/hostile races): '*Why use the door when you can use the window?', there were also energy concerns: The main operator can likewise send those in transport anywhere with ease. A possible explanation for this is put forward in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Technical Manual, where ...


18

Theoretically it can. This was a large topic of discussion in the TNG episode Unnatural Selection (S02E07). In the episode, while quarantined on a shuttlecraft Doctor Pulaski contracts a disease that speeds up her aging process. While the Enterprise staff is coming up with solutions for saving her ...Transporter Chief Miles O'Brien gets an idea: they ...


17

Two possibilities come to mind: They were using the transporters. But the transporters can only move so many people at one time. The station has several hundred people on it at any one time, so rather than everyone standing around waiting for their turn, they decide it would be faster to just walk to the nearest evacuation shuttle/ship. Today, in any ...


17

There was no need by the TOS era. Transporters were equipped with biofilters: Biofilters were uniformly used on all Federation transporters by the 24th century. These filters functioned to decontaminate transported objects and prevent harmful substances, pathogens, and even certain forms of radiation (including theta radiation), from contaminating the ...


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