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2

Yes, because her life is a Focus Point in Time. The core of this episode is explained by Edith being a Focus Point in Time, which seems to be something where it's so obvious that a person has to die, that no one questions it (even if other things are less sure, as we will see below). As a side note, it's a common enough trope also within the Star Trek ...


7

There are actually two questions here. I shall take them in order. How many times is the literal phrase "Klingons on [or off] the starboard bow" spoken in Star Trek: The Original Series? Zero. There is, however a single mention of the ship's "starboard bow" in TOS: Charlie X where we're told: UHURA: Sir, something off our starboard bow. ...


19

The U.S.S. Defiant referred to in season 1 of Star Trek: Discovery is not the one seen in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. It's the Constitution Class U.S.S. Defiant first seen in the original series episode The Tholian Web, where it's lost in some sort of weird space rupture. This is the future phenomenon that Burnham's line alludes to. In the Star Trek: ...


9

Starfleet probes are not very flexible or smart A starfleet Class 8 probe is a missile loaded with sensors. Its entire job is to be fired at something interesting and report back in detail. It lacks meaningful ability for sustained exploration or searching. It lacks the intelligence to perform any sort of analysis. Let alone enough to consider whether the ...


27

They believed the Pentarans were on top of the situation. Specifically, by the time they arrive in the Pentarus system, the miners have already searched the two habitable M-class planets and are planning to search the moons: DATA: The only Class M planets in the system are Pentarus two and five, both of which have been thoroughly searched by the miners. ...


15

The answer you linked offers one key clue Note that this object doesn't contain a warp engine, but rather a warp 'sustainer', meaning that it can only travel at the speed at which it was fired. The implication is this isn't a ship but an "unguided missile" sensor. So you would have to plot a course for the probe run the Enterprise up to an ...


7

The Enterprise carries a complement of spatial probes including Class 8 probes which are capable of sustained warp flight at warp 9. Note that this object doesn't contain a warp engine, but rather a warp 'sustainer', meaning that it can only travel at the speed at which it was fired. Class VIII Medium-Range Multimission Warp Probe Modified photon torpedo ...


5

If we're sticking strictly to TNG canon, that would have to be a runabout In Federation starship classification, a runabout was the designation of a type of vessel smaller than a starship but larger than a shuttlecraft. Runabouts were equipped with limited weapons and drive systems, but offered additional living space and the ability to be configured to ...


2

In the TOS episode "Miri", the landing party chases Miri into a house. And I think it is a piano in the house which is the subject of the lines: KIRK: How old is this thing? SPOCK: About three hundred years. http://www.chakoteya.net/StarTrek/12.htm If that is correct, that is one more example of a piano in Star Trek.


13

The episode spawned a licenced fotonovel. As you can see from the cover, Kirk and Spocko are using their limited supply of urban slang (in Kirk's case, gleaned from his own knowledge of 1920s American slang and the info he got from his copy of 'Chicago Mobs of the Twenties') to express their desires. In this instance it's a set of wheels he's after, along ...


17

If Memory Alpha is to believed, the piano is seen or referenced 15 times. However, the actual count is higher: Twice in TOS (including movies) Three times in The Next Generation (including movies) Six times in Deep Space 9 At least 3 times in Voyager Unnamed holodeck location, Seven & Chakotay in Human Error (pic). Le Coeur de Lion (holodeck), played ...


32

Star Trek Films Damen Lindelof advises of the 9/11 inspiration in Star Trek (2009), used to build the new film franchise: On fallout "ripple effect" of the destruction of Vulcan While talking about the parallels between modern terrorism and Nero in Star Trek 2009, Damon Lindelof appeared to imply that the impact of the destruction of Vulcan will ...


33

"Wheels" was a slang term for cars back in the 1960s and 1970s. Maybe earlier and later as well, but certainly during those decades. Kirk isn't surprised at seeing wheels (the round things on the car.) Kirk is making use of his knowledge of outdated slang. Outdated in his time, at least. Viewers in the 1960s understood him perfectly well. In a ...


27

From the transcript available online, Kirk’s statement is not exclamatory, but declarative with a “period.” I don’t take that as authoritative, and Shatner always makes discerning between declarative vs. exclamatory statements nearly impossible. But taken in context of their immediately following discussion where both appear familiar with workings of an ...


0

My best guess is that Xahea is not a class-M planet in the traditional Star Trek sense, but a living being. Remember Queen Po in the Short Treks episode she treated the planet as her twin sister, which may mean the planet itself is alive and relates in some way with its inhabitants. As for the brownish stuff, when you see brown clouds, it's usually some ...


10

In PIC: Absolute Candor (Season 1, episode 4), just before Narek teaches Soji the "ancient Borg ritual", we see her doing the head tilt. Approx. 22:19


0

I'll start off with an out of universe and end up in universe. Having built many large scale factories and other devices, you build the overall device first and then "thread" the cables from location to location. Not having crawl spaces precludes you from doing so. In order to eliminate crawlspaces you would have to fit cables/conduits to the ...


0

To my knowledge, it's never been mentioned on-screen why the tubes exist. However, one of the reasons might be that a small, possibly reinforced tube is structurally more stable than a hallway built for comfort, so if there is an explosion the hallway might be blocked by debris, but the access tunnel could survive and be used to bypass the debris. Since the ...


7

"I thought they were all called Jefferies Tubes, but it seems those are only the ones that go to the warp engines" You were right the first time. The little tunnels throughout the ship ARE Called Jefferies tubes. And the canonical reason for them: a network of power conduits run through them. Example, from the episode Power Play. [Jefferies ...


8

Like pretty much everything in Star Trek, it's a combination of "inspired by reality", "made to fit a TV budget", and "whatever drama requires". "Inspired by reality" usually means wet navy in the case of Star Trek, and ships certainly have plenty of cramped machine spaces, but in this case I detect an influence from ...


0

I dont know about the original series but in later series when we see the tubes in use its usually for some emergency Dr.Crusher evacuating sickbay in first contact, Suter hiding from the Kazon in Voyager, so in universe while it may never be explained they seem to be emergency access points that allow you to get from almost anywhere on the ship to almost ...


2

I can list a few examples of mentions of the English language in TOS. Since I am most familiar with TOS I will limit my examples and discussion of what language crewmembers speak and how they communicate with outsiders to TOS. In "The Man Trap" The Salt vampire meets Uhura: UHURA (to crewmen) The door to my quarters still rattles when it opens. ...


0

To expand on the answer by LogicDictates, it just needs to be added that Universal Translator is part of all Federation communications protocols. It is thus quite possible that most of the people learn just one language and let machine do the rest. And since UT - as per quote from Kirk in linked answer - is picking up on other data, too, it is highly ...


11

You're referring to the 22nd episode of Star Trek: Voyager Season 2, "Innocence". In this episode, Tuvok is stranded on a moon with a group of humanoid aliens who look and behave like children, and so he assumes that's what they are. However, it's later revealed by other members of their species, Drayans, that they age in reverse, and one of these '...


1

The episode is ST:VOY S2E22 - Innocence. Oneliner from Memory Alpha: Tuvok is trapped on a moon with a group of alien children who are disappearing, one by one. You can read a summary of the episode on memory alpha. A very short part is that Tuvok is contacted by the race of the children and they explain that their race "ages in reverse" and that ...


7

Jerry Sohl, one of the early writers on Star Trek: The Original Series, explained that the Enterprise crew members all speak English. We were originally going to have [each crew member] carry a language translator, which would fit on the wrist like a beeper, and no matter what area of the universe they were in, the thoughts that the people were thinking ...


7

The route of the Phoenix is shown in the Star Trek: Star Charts factbook. The distance travelled appears to be approximately the diameter of Earth's orbit (e.g. 16 light minutes). In the film (and the film's novelisation), the ship travels at lightspeed (Warp 1) for what appears to be several minutes. We then cut to the action on board the Enterprise, they ...


-1

They used a radioisotope that "attaches itself to the DNA of one of the merged species, but not the other." There is not another indicator. This would suggest that the one who did not have the radioisotope attached to his DNA, might still be merged with the flower, as nothing was done to separate it. I think that, in the test case, there were two ...


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