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I’ve since thought of a possible reason, but I’m not entirely happy with it. It could be that they were looking for boots to prove that the 2 crew did come from the enterprise. Or that all boots were accounted for without Klingon blood and therefore the 2 crew didn’t come from the enterprise. However, neither of these help in the matter of logs. Indeed it ...


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From the original script. CHANG: You crippled our gravitational field with a direst torpedo hit, and two Starfleet crewmen beamed board in magnetic boots and did this! WE HAVE WITNESSES!. This information was conveyed to Spock. Since he knows that the Enterprise was sabotaged after the beam-out, it seems logical that the assassins would have beamed back to ...


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According to the Star Trek: The Next Generation Technical Manual, the Enterprise-D is equipped with six lateral sensor arrays. The Primary Hull has forward-facing, port-facing and starboard-facing sensor arrays, while the Secondary (Engineering) Hull has aft-facing, port-facing and starboard-facing sensor arrays. The Galaxy Class Enterprise features one of ...


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Spot was played by at least six different cats over the seven seasons and movies where Spot makes an appearance. Spot actually changes from a long-haired Somali cat to an orange tabby in Season 6. Even Spot's gender changes from male to female in the course of the series. In universe, it's possible Data simply owned multiple cats, all named Spot, although ...


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In the (much newer) series Star Trek: Lower Decks, other VISOR wearing people appear, for instance in the first episode of the first season 'Second Contact' (image from TrekCore)


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We see from Geordi's POV on several occasions. In the episode TNG: Heart of Glory when he uses a "Visual Acuity Transmitter" In the episode TNG: The Mind's Eye, albeit his vision has been tampered with by the Romulans. In the episode TNG: The Enemy, noting that his 'neural ...


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The seams were obviously to tailor the costumes. You'll note in the picture of LeVar Burton shown below that he has two horizontal seams on the chest, and other characters from other episodes show them as well. The only reason for those seams would be to adjust the tailoring to be as fitting as possible for the specific performer. What I suspect happened is ...


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Frankly, transporter technology is one of the leading causes of problems in space exploration. Poorly-executed transports can be gruesome affairs. Interference from the environment can lead to any number of medical or existential issues, such as fusing people into new life forms, duplicating officers, creating phased-out ghost officers, accidentally turning ...


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Star Trek: Lower Decks (which is canon-ish) featured an Exocomp who was a member of Starfleet


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According to Memory-Alpha, which lists as source the Star Trek: Fan Collective - Borg DVD set text commentary: Cliff Bole filmed the scene wherein Riker and Worf share an elevator trip – from one corridor to another – in one continuous shot, using a subtle lighting difference in the corridor set to make it seem as if the turbolift (which did not actually ...


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Taking into account that the background setting is identical, it looks like they simply altered the lighting slightly between the time that Riker and Worf walk into the lift and then walked out again. The door in the background is a dark umber colour when they walk in and then lighter orange when they walk out, an effect that would be achieved by merely ...


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We actually only know of one changeling on Earth, the one that caused the original explosion that led Odo and Sisko to Earth in the first place. Although Changeling/O'Brien claims that there are four others, we don't really have any evidence to back that up and the absence of any further action (and the precautions put in place by Starfleet with low level ...


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Disclaimer: This answer is pure speculation since there has never been any official answer to this question. It seems to me that at some point the script of Caretaker must have had a reason for Voyager carrying tricobalt devices, but that the scene or dialog revealing such was just cut. There is no other reasonable explanation IMO for why Voyager would not ...


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On one occasion, Rom is told by O'Brien and Jadzia that not being as much of a Ferengi is a good thing. Racist condescension.


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I think most people here have a misunderstanding of Chinese names in English before standardized pinyin made the spellings more standard. Kim is often used to denote the Chinese name of Jin and as you can guess from just reading it it does sound a lot like Singh. A lot of Chinese names before pinyin simply used whatever English words that existed for an ...


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In the EU novel DS9: Original Sin, we learn that replicators on Bajor (a Federation planet by this point in the timeline) are designed not to allow the replication of controlled substances without medical supervision. “You know I won’t tell anybody, Tavus,” Winser said. She squeezed his arm. “But you have to be careful with something like this.” She pointed ...


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This is a really interesting question, but it and most of the answers are severely humano-centric. What constitutes a drug (or poison) would vary wildly from species to species. Consider substances like cocoa and capsaicin here on Earth. How would a replicator restrict substances across ALL the species that make up the Federation? It seems like there would ...


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From a purely technical standpoint there's likely nothing stopping a replicator from creating various psychedelic substances considering the complexity of other items it can create. The main restriction is one of acquiring the replicator patterns for such potentially dangerous substances without being blocked by security measures. One of the previous answers ...


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I believe in an episode of Voyager where a member of the Q commits suicide ("Death Wish"), it is said that the replicator could not reproduce a poisonous substance. This was an answer to Captain Janeway's question as to where the Q got the substance. Not the best answer, but a small clue perhaps. Here's the exact dialogue from the scene in question:...


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I can't remember a TNG episode which dealt with the topic of substance abuse in form of chemical recreational drugs. But the episode The Game deals with devices which cause addiction by directly manipulating the pleasure center of the users brain. These devices get produced by the ship's replicators and they do so without requiring any circumvention of ...


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We've seen that the Federation will do what it has to do when push comes to shove, treaties or not. There's POWERFUL weapons out there, and if brought to bear, we'd use the cloaking device. There's an abundance of technology left lying around... stuff developed but not utilized. Some with "political reasons", some just should have never been ...


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Cloaking technology that can beat advanced sensors is complicated. In “Balance of Terror”, the Romulan cloaking device was good enough to hide the ship so long as it didn't move. In “The Enterprise Incident” the Romulans developed a cloaking device that could hide from sensors, and the Enterprise had to capture one to help understand it. In “Into the Forest ...


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I’m sure I saw an episode where a character said the Federation had philosophical objections against using cloaking devices. The use of cloaked ships would run counter to the Federation’s self-image of being friendly explorers/benevolent colonisers, not deceptive (Romulans) or warlike (Klingons). I don’t have any source for this. I’d I can recall it, I’ll ...


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The Federation did develop cloaking technology on its own. In 2358, Starfleet Intelligence equipped the USS Pegasus with a device capable of rendering the ship both invisible and intangible. The only problem is that the Federation was forbidden from developing or using cloaking technology in its spacecraft under the Treaty of Algeron, signed between the ...


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