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72

Yes, he did. This was a fairly common thing for him to do; many of his stories demonstrate this behavior. It's more true with his Juvenile works, but it was common for him to specifically write his characters so that the reader would identify with them, not indicating anything about race, only later to drop some kind of information that hinted pretty ...


71

First, major differences: Moral/philosophical/ethical/political/social underpinnings. The novel was an ode to the citizen soldier, with in-depth asides for explaining the ethical and political system of humanity. Christopher Weuve's excellent "Thoughts on Starship Troopers" resource addresses this in great detail with supporting cites, see especially "...


62

As late as 1980, the year of publication for Expanded Universe, a book of fiction and essays, Heinlein made no apology for Starship Troopers. He attacked the book's critics as largely being unable to adequately understand written English. Heinlein also made a case for increasing the requirements for the franchise in some fashion and offered some serious ...


47

There is no ambiguity in the scene where it is revealed Juan Rico speaks Tagalog. I added something to myself and Bennie said "What did you say?" "Sorry, Bernado. Just an old saying in my own language....." "But what language was it?" "Tagalog. My native language." (End of Chapter 13)


38

Well. I only saw the first movie, so I don't know what might have transpired in later straight-to-video sequels. At the beginning of the first movie, in the class, there is a lecture taking place: Rasczak: I wonder what the city fathers of Hiroshima would say about that. You. Carmen: They probably wouldn't say anything. Hiroshima was destroyed. ...


33

To answer the primary question, in both the book and the movie women had 100% the same right to enter the Federal Service and through it, to become citizens. AncientSwordRage's answer addresses the movie, so I'll address the book. The official rules are cited by Sergeant Ho at the time of Rico's recruitment: But if you want to serve and I can't talk ...


31

I took it to mean that the Surgeon wasn't a Roughneck. As in, he was attached to the Starship crew, rather than to the Roughneck platoon. They don't mention the fact that the Pilot stays behind, but that's obviously so; the Roughnecks are merely hitching a ride along on a Navy transport, so the Navy crew is distinct from the Army platoon. This is reinforced ...


25

There's a scene in the book where on the first day of boot camp, the super-hardass Sergeant Zim accidentally breaks someone's wrist in a hand-to-hand combat demo. He says "I'm sorry. You hurried me a little," and sends the soldier off to the hospital. In the movie I remember a similar scene at the start of boot camp where the sergeant deliberately and ...


25

At least two major themes remain from the book: Citizenship (and the right to vote) is earned, not just something you are born into. Alien bugs at war with humans Beyond that, not so much remains. There is no powered battle armor. I suppose some of the character names may remain, and Buenos Aires gets crunched in both, but not much else.


25

First of all, we are talking about Starship Troopers, the book, right? Too bad they never made a movie based on it. ;) The society depicted in Starship Troopers seems fascist only at the first glance: military seems to be in power, and corporal punishment is widely used. However, people only get citizenship and suffrage after their military service, and ...


25

The short answer is no, it's not a future of an alternate history. The film is a deliberate satirization of the novel's fascist themes, and a lot of that satire takes the form of Nazi-associated material. In the director's commentary on the film, he is asked directly if his Nazi symbolism was deliberate, specifically referring to the swastika-shaped ...


24

This is going to be anecdotal, but I would say at this point it's impossible to draw a conclusion. As far as I know Heinlein never said if the Mobile Infantry is based on any specific branch. Heinlein's military service in the Navy would push me towards the Marine Corps as the influence. The quote "Come on you Apes, do you want to live forever?" is ...


21

Your obvious negative opinion of Heinlein's ideas has led you into a false premise... The society of Starship Troopers isn't fascist, it's very clearly not a dictatorship. One of the points of the novel was to examine what a society might look like if voting was restricted by something other than age, but it's still a democratic society, not a totalitarian ...


19

...You got me, it's a tip of the hat to Heinlein. I've put in several homages to my favorite authors and at least one nod to a television show so far...but yep, that's Heinlein. However, the reasons the character Ia gives for boot chevrons during Basic Training in the first book, A SOLDIER'S DUTY, are the actual reasons the DoI (Department of Innovations) ...


17

The members of the Circle of the Ouroboros are introduced as: Master Mobyas Toras of Barsoom (Timeline 1, Coded John Carter) Her Wisdom Star, Arbitrar of the Ninety Universes (Composite timeline, Coded Cyrano) Woodrow Wilson Smith, Senior of the Howard Families (Timeline 2, Coded Leslie LeCroix) Dr. Jubal Harshaw (Timeline 3, Coded Neil Armstrong) Dr. Hilda ...


17

Starship Troopers is a book that glorifies military service, the idea being that those who have fought for freedom have earned it, whereas others merely passively take advantage of the benefits such fighters secure for them. Starship troopers also features a insectoid foe similar to the Buggers. Ender's Game is in a sense about the high price of unthinking ...


14

The movie is meant to be a message on war. On the DVD commentary Verhoeven said I can tell you that the movie is in fact, in our opinion, stating that war makes fascists of us all. The screenwriter, Edward Neumeier, immediately agreed with Verhoeven. Also according to Neumeier the whole movie was modeled on the "Why We Fight" films of World War II. ...


14

lays out a view of the future where only the military is allowed full citizenship Citizenship is not about military. It is tied to responsibility. As it should. And opposite as we have it most places in today's world, especially where "democracy" reigns. And responsibility must be demonstrated up-start, and lasting as long as one's life. In the ST world ...


14

I read people's responses here, and I cant believe that it seems everybody missed one important thing about the government set-up in Starship Troopers. i.e. that no one in the military had the right to vote while still serving in the military. Also, it was not just the military, but ANY federal service that you had to serve to earn your franchise. You only ...


14

After writing up the entire question, I clicked a related question about a Star Trek Choose Your Own Adventure and found Hypnosifl's answer pointing me to gamebooks.org. It was Robert Heinlein's Starship Troopers: Shines the Name.


12

Proving that something did not exist before "X" is logically near impossible. But a search in Goggle books for "boot chevrons" finds 4 hits the earliest being a 1959 entry about Heinlein. The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction - Volume 17 - Page 133 It would be safe to assume that the term was first published by him, of course the concept is real. ...


11

According to the film script it's actually Captain Deladier who is the Instructor. Zander is merely Ibanez' supervisor and a lowly Second Lieutenant to boot, a rank that Ibanez evidently secures as soon as she qualifies as a pilot, a few weeks later: ATHENA - COMMAND AND CONTROL - DAY CYCLE - CARMEN arrives on the bridge, dark, cramped, all-business. ...


10

The movie is, at best, inspired by the book. Not that it's a bad movie, I found i pretty entertaining. But other than borrowing some names, places and events they really have very little in common. The book is to a large extent a political and philosophical statement about militarism and moral imperatives. The movie is mostly a war/adventure-story with some ...


10

This is not quite a direct naming of the religion, but Stranger in a Strange Land had a a character named "Professor" Simon Magus, a carnival grifter and mentalist who is described as a "likable scoundrel". Simon Magus was one of the founders of Gnosticism. The links between Gnosticism and Stranger run much deeper than a mere character name. A very good ...


10

Re: Reconciling the differences: There is a clear difference in the settings: The Union in Troopers was engaged in a interstellar war, with at least three intelligent belligerents (Humans, Bugs and Skinnies). Stranger in a Strange Land was a first contact tale of a sorts (still clearly intra-system), with (at least as far was revealed) benign Martian aliens....


10

Starship Troopers is influential in popularising the idea, but it's nowhere near the origin point for the concept of powered armor. A quick glance at Wikipedia indicates that the concept of powered exoskeletons well predates Heinlein: the first prototypes were developed in the 1890s and 1910s. The idea of using a powered exoskeleton for armor was already ...


10

Lieutenant Rasczak saved him, according to other Roughnecks. From the film's script, right after Johnny Rico is released from the healing chamber and he and Ace and Dizzy join Roughnecks. Here's the script's scene: Ace: So, I hear your lieutenant is a real nut-buster Birdie belts him, and Ace goes down. Birdie: No one talks about the Lieutenant that ...


10

Workers and warriors are same size (because they can't be easily told apart, if they weren't it would be easy) But we were learning. Technical instructions and tactical doctrine orders resulted from every brush with them, spread through the Fleet. We learned to tell the workers from the warriors—if you had time, you could tell from the shape of the ...


10

In addition to the hand flamer and the rocket launcher, at one point in the first drop Rico uses his "heavy flamer" to burn a hole in a wall. But mostly Rico specifically doesn't talk about their weapons: [...] what can be done with really modern weapons and how to do it and how to service and maintain the equipment -- simulated nuclear weapons and ...


9

According to Juan Rico, the Skinnies are humanoid, eight or nine feet tall, much skinnier than humans are and have a higher body temperature. And they don't wear clothes. These geezers are humanoid, eight or nine feet tall, much skinnier than we are and with a higher body temperature; they don't wear any clothes and they stand out in a set of snoopers ...


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