54

This sounds like the infamous Plan 9 from Outer Space. The titular plan involves using pineal and pituitary stimulation to awaken the dead: The Ruler : What Plan will you follow now? Eros : Plan 9. It's been absolutely impossible to work through these earth creatures. Their soul is too controlled. The Ruler: Plan 9? The Ruler : Ah, yes. Plan 9 deals with ...


40

Playboy and the Slime God by Asimov, aka What is this Thing called Love. “The bosom does not consist of globes or spheres. I know what globes or spheres are and in these pictures you have shown me, they are so depicted. Those are large globes. On this creature, though, what we have are nothing but small flaps of dry tissue. And they’re discolored, too, ...


33

Arena, by Frederic Brown, first published in the June 1944 issue of Astounding Science Fiction magazine. A Star Trek episode, also called Arena, had similarities. In order to avoid legal problems, it was agreed that Brown would receive payment and a story credit.


30

This is Doctor Sleep, the sequel to The Shining. Ewan MacGregor hosts an AA meeting and there's a fairly memorable scene with a kid in a field having his essence drained. Warning: NSFW - Horror


29

This is "The Sack" (1950) by William Morrison. You've described it well, with one small difference: the custodian is not the actual astronaut that found the creature. As you say, the main theme is that the government charges large sums to ask questions. A memorable scene involves a Senator (or equivalent) trying to ask the Sack if he will be ...


25

Sounds like "Plan 9 From Outer Space": Made in 1957, shot in black and white The titular "Plan 9" refers to "a scheme to resurrect the Earth's dead, referred to as "ghouls"" Awarded the title of "Worst Film Ever" and described as "the epitome of so-bad-it's-good cinema" Personally I couldn't spot ...


24

I believe you are seeking the 2004 book Fitzpatrick's War by Theodore Judson. It was first published by Daw Books. Points that match: Book named "Someone"'s War. Yep. The setting seems to be in a future version of Earth Match. 25th century Earth which complex technology is outlawed with religious fervor Partial Match. It is not so much just ...


22

A New Golden Age by Rudy Rucker? See Mathematical Fiction for a summary. A few of the details don't match but most of it does: “The music …” he began. “The music most people listen to is not good.” I didn’t see what he was getting at, and started my usual defense of rock music. “Muzak,” Mies interrupted. “Isn’t that what you call it…what they play in ...


22

This is "Conquest by Default" by Vernor Vinge. It's a very close match to what you remember. It was published in Analog in May 1968. The aliens live in a Libertarian paradise (which is moderated by the "Umpires" who really (somehow) don't become corrupt) and the narrator came to a post WW3 Earth where the aliens have tried to set up ...


21

This is The Mote in God's Eye by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. A wealthy merchant boasts of having drunk the Imperial-only coffee blend. “Have you heard of Jamaica Blue Mountain? It grows on Earth itself, on a large island; the island was never bombed, and the mutations were weeded out in the centuries following the collapse of the CoDominium. It cannot ...


21

This story is almost certainly "Grownups" by Ian R. Macleod. It was first published in Asimov's in 1992, and later appeared in Gardner Dozois' "The Year's Best Science Fiction: Tenth Annual Collection" in 1993. It can be read at the Baen website. A summary gives these details: All children are born as girls or boys, and go through normal ...


19

I wonder if this is "A Matter of Magnitude" by Al Sevcik. It is available on Project Gutenberg, so that at least matches. In the story the gigantic human ship is menaced by an unknown alien ship they can't detect, so the human ship flees thinking the aliens must be too advanced to confront. Big Joe (as she is known) is a damn Big Ship: "She'...


18

It is the X-Bomber from Star Fleet. The exact moment that was stuck in my head (at 11:31): And it is a weapon, not ramp... lol. This shows you how faded the memory was! :) It wasn't even an animation. :D Thank you SQB.


15

Copying my (unaccepted) answer to an old question: "History Lesson" by Arthur C. Clarke, first published in Startling Stories, May 1949, available at the Internet Archive. The alien scientists are from Venus. Here is a plot summary from Wikipedia: The first part of the story is told from the perspective of a tribe of nomadic humans in a future ...


14

It isn't a short story. It's the first chapter of the novel Fiasco. It takes place on Titan. The astronaut operating the golem (called a Goliath) is Parvis, and he is setting out to rescue a certain Commander Pirx who has crashed on Titan. Parvis takes the Goliath into an ice cave in search of Pirx and the cave collapses on him. The chapter ends: Neither ...


14

Found it! It's Friction, by Will McIntosh Gruen was on the sixty-first master, and while his wisdom had grown steadily, he had worn very little. He was incredibly well-preserved–the palms of his three-fingered hands still sported the deep, swirling ridges that had worn to nothing in most people before they’d lived thirty years. Indeed, all of the myriad ...


13

I recognised this premise from the 1990s cartoon episode Make a Wish and Attack of the Octobot. This episode [Attack of the Octobot] and Make a Wish are based on a combination of two different storylines from The Amazing Spider-Man comics which are The Amazing Spider-Man #55 - 56 (December, 1967 - January, 1968) and The Amazing Spider-Man #248 (January, ...


12

"Dead End", a 1952 short story by Wallace Macfarlane, available at Project Gutenberg. You may have read it in the Groff Conklin anthology Science-Fiction Thinking Machines: Robots, Androids, Computers or the abridged paperback edition Selections from Science-Fiction Thinking Machines. "But, Johnny darling—" began Monica Drake Lane. "...


12

A Conquest of Two Worlds by Edmond Hamilton. The protagonist is Mart Halkett. At his court martial he gives his reasons for defending the Jovians: INSIDE the great building Halkett stood up and heard his conduct judged. The officers who heard the case gave him a fair trial. His counsel argued ably concerning Halkett’s previous gallant record, the ...


10

As mentioned in the comments this sounds very like the story Swarm by Bruce Sterling. Only the beginning is different because in Swarm the story is set against the background of a conflict between different human factions in the Solar System. An asteroid has entered the Solar System occupied by creatures collectively known as the Swarm. It is described much ...


10

I think this is "Who Shall Dwell", a short story by H.C Neal. It was originally published in Playboy in 1962, and later appeared in a few anthologies. As noted, the plot initially is similar to the of "The Shelter", the episode of the Twilight Zone, but the conclusion is much more optimistic. Exactly as the OP recalled, a mob surrounds a ...


9

Could this be Thor Vol.1 #131 (1966), specifically the story "They Strike from Space!"? Thor resists a Rigellian psychic weapon and the aliens are impressed, with one of them stating: Behold! He begins to rise! He threatens to break the Mind Thrust! Never -- since time's first dawning -- has any living being displayed such power!


9

This sounds like the Mara Dyer trilogy (Mara not Maya) by Michelle Hodkin: Mara cannot remember anything about the night her friends did. All she knows is what she’s been told: they went to an abandoned asylum, the building collapsed, and only Mara survived. Two months later, Mara is eager to move forward with her life in a new town, but that’s easier said ...


9

The closest I can find is Douglas Hill. He was Canadian not British but he moved to London and wrote most of his books there. He was killed (in London) when he was struck by a bus while crossing the road. His writing is exactly what you describe as very short and easy to read, but then the books were targeted at young readers. The trilogy you remember is the ...


8

This is possibly War of the Computers by Granville Wilson. I've never read it and don't know much about it, however the book cover in this link seems to match the description of robot policemen pointing guns. Summary from the back cover of the copy in the Internet Archive (with some guesses for the part covered by the sticker): Charlie Harper lives in the ...


8

I regret to say that Dan Dare never found his father alive. According to this blog post, in the 15th issue of Eagle, October 4th, 1959 ‘Terra Nova’ rapidly degenerated into a fight with giant ants, whilst its successor, ‘Trip to Trouble’ took only five weeks to undermine the whole point of Hampson’s vision. In Xmas week, the new Eagle revealed that Dan’s ...


7

This sounds very much like "Blood Bank" by Walter Miller, first published in Astounding in 1952. The story follows very closely the plot given in the question. The protagonist, Commander Eli Roki, shoots down an emergency medical-supply ship from Earth after it refuses permission for a random inspection. Roci actions were technically not in breach ...


6

Is this Moon 44 (1990)...? From IMDB: An unconventional corporate agent is given the task of shaping a group of violent criminals and technical wizards into a helicopter defense force assigned to protect a mining station on a remote moon. From Wikipedia: Moon 44 is a 1990 English-language German science fiction action film from Centropolis Film ...


6

I happened across the story in an old anthology from the library. The story is "Memories of Muriel" by Paula May. It appeared in the original anthology Universe 2, which was edited by Robert Silverberg. It never appeared anywhere else according to ISFDb. Some of the details are different, but it is essentially as originally posted. In the story ...


6

While it doesn't use the word "computer," Lewis Padgett's "The Twonky" has this plot. It was first published in the September 1942 issue of Astounding, but it's been reprinted in many anthologies. It's available on the Internet Archive.


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