76

Could this be The Chronicles of Riddick? There's a scene where various characters are climbing an outcrop. When the sun touches them, they burn horribly.


50

This bears some similarities to "Youth", a short story by Isaac Asimov. First published in 1952, it is certainly an old story - much older than the 1970s. It deals with some aliens seeking a trade deal with a new planet, but things quickly get out of hand after they crash and are found by the children of the locals they were supposed to meet. The ...


42

One for the Road by Gardner Dozois. I read it in his anthology Geodesic Dreams. You have remembered the conversation very accurately: Moving with exaggerated care, he polished off his drink, and set it carefully back on the water ring it had made on the bar top. He turned to face me again. “Would you tell anyone, if you knew?” I thought about it. “If I did, ...


40

I found the book! It is called Running out of Time (1995) by Margaret Peterson Haddix. Jessie Keyser is a 13-year-old girl from the village of Clifton, Indiana, in the 1840s. During a village-wide outbreak of diphtheria, Jessie's mother reveals it is really 1996, and Clifton Village is a tourist attraction. Also, there are cameras all around watching them, ...


39

I think this is probably Roger Zelazny's Changeling (1980). Two young boys are switched between a magical world and a technological one, and grow up favouring the system of their birthworlds, making them outcasts. Pol, the magical one, sees magic as strands. Quoting from the plot summary on Wikipedia: In the world of magic, the young Mark Marakson is ...


37

Sounds like this scene from Judge Dredd (1995).


34

This is the 1998 film The Faculty, about a group of six teenagers who defend their town from mind-controlling alien parasites. One of the main characters is a football player, and a major scene takes place at a high school football game. There is also a scene where the teenagers snort a homemade powdered drug in order to demonstrate that none of them are ...


32

The background is not quite as you describe; the 427th Light Maintenance Battalion of the Imperial Space Marines is stranded largely by being forgotten, and the Galactic Protectorate (a successor state to the Empire) hasn't so much lost technical ability as stripped competent personnel from the fleet to keep it from being able to revolt. That said, I'm ...


30

I think what you are remembering is an episode of Star Trek: Voyager, specifically "Coda" (season 3 episode 15). To quote from Memory Alpha: After her apparent death, Captain Janeway's journey to the afterlife, guided by her father, leaves her with suspicions.


30

This is the 2009 film Knowing, starring Nicolas Cage. The time capsule was buried in 1959, and contains students' drawings of what the future will look like in fifty years' time. One student, a girl named Lucinda, fills her page with a seemingly nonsensical string of random numbers. When the capsule is opened in 2009, Lucinda's sheet is given to a current ...


26

There's a story very like this -- Connie Willis's "Ado." It's not students but a teacher who picks Hamlet to teach because it has the fewest issues, and by the time they are done censoring out everything that's objected to, they are left with a few sentences.


25

I think the OP is conflating the passage from Cryptonomicon which @JohnRennie posted, and a passage from chapter 61 of Snow Crash between Hiro and Juanita: "Why? Why doesn't [the cult of Asherah] work on you?" "I've spent the last several years hanging around with Jesuits," she says. "Look. Your brain has an immune system, just ...


25

This is definitely Harry Harrison's Deathworld trilogy (1960-1968), released as a single volume The Deathworld Trilogy (1974). Relating to your points: The planet is "Pyrrus" (hinting at "Pyrrhic victory") and the colony are miners; They have retreated over generations of continuous attacks to a single fortified city; The wildlife ...


24

"Rotating Cylinders and the Possibility of Global Causality Violation", a short story by Larry Niven. A project has been completed to construct an enormous rod in space. When the rod is spun up to near light speed, a space ship will be able to dive near it and travel back in time. "Take a massive cylinder," Quifting said patiently, "...


24

"Expendable", a short story by Philip K. Dick, first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July 1953, available at the Internet Archive. It was part of the (unaccepted) answer to this anthology-identification question. Wikipedia summary: The plot centers on an unnamed human being caught in the middle of the ongoing, million ...


21

This is The Last Legionary series, where the book people seem to remember was Deathwing over Veynaa. Some of what you described comes from Galactic Warlord: The Overseers also explain that, since the radiation sickness had settled into his bones, they were forced to replace his entire skeleton—using an unbreakable alloy—effectively rendering Keill's bones ...


20

This is Earth Abides (1949) by George R. Stewart. While working on his graduate thesis in geology in the Sierra Nevada mountains, Ish is bitten by a rattlesnake. As he heals from the bite, taking refuge in a cabin, he gets sick with a disease that looks like measles, and he moves in and out of consciousness (at one point being approached by two men who flee ...


20

Neal Stephenson's The Diamond Age matches the description. Then the constable turned to Bud and said, very fast: "Are you a member of any signatory tribe, phyle, registered diaspora, franchise-organized quasi-national entity, sovereign polity, or any other form of dynamic security collective claiming status under the CEP?" Each tribe is self-...


20

Are you thinking of Larry Niven's Ringworld series? There is an alien race called the Pak who were the ancestors of humans. They were the species Homo Habilis that evolved into modern humans. When they get old they eat a plant called Tree-of-life that causes them to transform into a powerful and intelligent form called a Protector. Humans are also ...


18

This is almost certainly K-PAX. The movie dates from 2001 so is just within the timeframe given by OP. The movie centres around a psychologist (Jeff Bridges) as he tries to get to the bottom of the story of one of his patients (played by Kevin Spacey). The interrogation/interview vibe as noted in the question is the conversations that are had between the ...


18

I remember seeing a cover on a paperback book by Andre Norton with a boy riding a device like a surfboard flying in the air. I don't remember if there was a tower or a "terror dactyl" on the cover. If my memory is correct I probably saw the cover in the 1960s so a book or edition published after 1970 would probably not be the one I remember. ...


18

This is Protector by Larry Niven. Humans (originally a species called 'Pak') originated from a planet near the galactic core. Pak are born stupid as 'Breeders', but then as they grow older they instinctively eat the root of the "Tree of Life" which transforms them into super-intelligent, super-strong 'Protectors'. Protectors, as the name implies,...


17

In case anyone's interested, this came to mind again and I managed to track it down. It's The Forest of Hours by Kerstin Ekman. This novel begins in the Middle Ages when Skord, a magical being who is neither man nor animal, finds himself in a forest with no memory, no past and no language. As he observes the behaviour of the human beings he meets in the ...


17

I suggested this in the comments as wild guess as the description was "pulp fiction, long-running from the 1970's" which put in my mind the Perry Rhodan series. Turned out to be correct as mentioned by the person asking, even though this series started in the 1960's.


17

I think the story is "Gray Matter" By Stephen King. It was published in Night Shift in 1978. From Wikipedia The story, told from the perspective of an older "local" man, begins as he is sitting around at a convenience store with a group of his friends during a heavy snowstorm. A young boy runs in, deathly afraid. The men recognize him as ...


16

I have an anthology that includes a story called "The Living Kuan-yin". It's described as a Chinese folk tale taken from Sweet and Sour: Tales from China, by Carol Kendall and Yao-wen Li. The details are slightly different, but I assume this is at least a form of the same story. It's the story of a poor man who travels to see the Living Kuan-Yin, a goddess ...


16

The closest I have found to this is indeed in Cryptonomicon. I don't have a page number because this is a Kindle book, but it is towards the end of the chapter titled Home, a little over halfway through the book. The passage is: The friendliest and most sincere welcome he’d gotten was from Scott, a chemistry professor, and Laura, a pediatrician, who, after ...


16

This is Robert Silverberg's Nightwings. Roum is a city built on seven hills. They say it was a capital of man in one of the earlier cycles. I knew nothing of that, for my guild was Watching, not Remembering; but yet as I had my first glimpse of Roum, coming upon it from the south at twilight, I could see that in former days it must have been if great ...


16

This is 'A Can of Paint' by A.E. Van Vogt Some of the plot (from Wikipedia).. The protagonist lands on Venus, the first man to successfully make the journey without falling into the Sun.Exiting the ship to begin exploring, he notices a cube-like object with a handle on it just outside the door. He picks it up and it speaks to him through mind telepathy. &...


15

Presumably this is Phantasmaplasmagoria by Herbert Jacob Bernstein. It was published in the April 1968 edition of Analog Science Fiction. The man had obviously been a fool or a liar; but Zave decided to humor him. "Go on." "I shall come to the point promptly. I did not quite comprehend the meaning of the contour plots. Perhaps you would be ...


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