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101

Excalibur #58 (1992) fits the bill, your villain being Alchemy. From ComicVine: Trouble on both sides! With both the Crazy Gang and the trolls that kidnapped Alchemy on the loose, can even the combined strength of Excalibur and the X-Men come out on top? As revealed in the previous issue, Alchemy was in with the trolls who used his mother as leverage ...


46

This is the comic you're referring to; Excalibur Vol 1 #58. Wolverine has his claws turned (temporarily) into rubber by Alchemy at the urging of a troll.


37

This is The Immortal Bard by Asimov: The physics professor, Dr. Phineas Welch, has gotten himself slightly drunk and begins speaking with Scott Robertson, a young English teacher. Welch announces, "I can bring back the spirits of the illustrious dead." [...] "So," he continues, "I tried Shakespeare." [...] Eventually, Welch says, he enrolled ...


35

I think you’ve conflated two different series, both of which have fixed interstellar teleport portals. The river that runs between different planets through the teleport portals is from the Hyperion Cantos series by Dan Simmons — it’s called the River Tethys. But the inventor of the portals waving at the first astronauts on Mars is the opening scene of the ...


30

I'd suggest that this is Stargate: Universe, the starship does this on a couple of occasions Destiny reactors are fueled by absorbing and storing stellar material through a series of ram scoops on the underside of each wing. To accomplish this, Destiny dives into the photosphere of a star, absorbing material during its ...


30

His followers called him Mahasamatman and said he was a god. He preferred to drop the Maha- and the -atman, however, and called himself Sam. He never claimed to be a god, but then he never claimed not to be a god. This is Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny. Lord of Light is the story of Sam, an original colonist ("First") of an initially hostile world and his ...


26

While there's not a lot to go on in the question, one possible match is Vernor Vinge's A Deepness in the Sky. In this two fleets of spaceships arrive at the same planet, inhabited by a Spiderlike race of sentient beings. After thousands of years searching, humans stand on the verge of first contact with an alien race. Two human groups: the Qeng Ho, a ...


22

"Trouble with Treaties" Katherine MacLean & Tom Condit The story has all the mentioned elements: hostile aliens, fake controls inside the fish tank, and the human crew screaming... It's The Cat! ...when the ship's cat enters the room.


20

Not much to go on, but Stargate: Universe fits the few details. Its last episode aired 8 years ago, it has the group of people stranded on the spaceship flying on auto and the ship does refuel in a sun. See if this looks familiar:


20

Rollback by Robert J. Sawyer. The novel focuses around Don Halifax and his wife of sixty years, Sarah, an astronomer who translated the first transmission sent from an extraterrestrial source to Earth 38 years prior to the opening of the story. Sarah, now 87, is tasked to decode the second message sent from the unknown alien race - if she can live long ...


19

'Annihilation' (2018) Some weird scene worth watching where Natalie Portman fights her shadow image (not unlike Link vs Dark Link in the Water Temple). From IMDb: At "Area X", a government facility on the southern coast of the US, Lena, a cellular-biology professor and former soldier, is in quarantine. She undergoes a debriefing about a four-month ...


18

A few years ago I picked up a paperback copy of Ice Prophet by William R. Forstchen. First published by Del Rey in 1983. It was Volume One of a trilogy. I haven't read the later installments, so I can't swear to the bit about the carbon nanotube. (If such a tube was explicitly mentioned in the first volume, I don't recall that much detail now. I do recall ...


18

Poul Anderson, "Epilogue" It starts: His name was a set of radio pulses. Converted into equivalent sound waves, it would have been an ugly squawk; so because he, like any consciousness, was the center of his own coordinate system, let him be called Zero. He was out hunting that day. Energy reserves were low in the cave. The other one who may ...


18

Almost certainly this is A.I. Artificial Intelligence. The scene with the robots in cages is below.


16

"The New Reality", a novelette by Charles L. Harness, also my (unaccepted) answer to this old question and this one; first published in Thrilling Wonder Stories, December 1950, available at the Internet Archive. The story matches your description, but Bishop Berkeley is not mentioned. Does any of these covers look familiar? The theory: The ontologist ...


15

This is the story "Far Centarus" by A.E. van Vogt as suggested by the comment. If you check out page 81 of the story in the January 1944 issue of Astounding Science Fiction, you'll find the term "adeledicnander electronic psychology" used for the technology which powers their FTL drive, which pretty much conclusively matches what you remember.


15

The Philadelphia Experiment (1984)? From IMDb: In 1943, the United States tests an anti-radar system to make the U.S. Navy ships invisible to the enemy. Dr. James Longstreet uses his experiment in the destroyer escort USS Eldridge that disappears from Philadelphia. The sailors David Herdeg and his best friend Jim Parker are projected to 1984, where they ...


14

Alien World: The Complete Illustrated Guide by Steven Eisler This was an art book of sci-fi aliens illustrated by various authors, with lurid descriptions invented by Mr. Eisler. Disembodied eye on the cover: Hand holding several eyeballs:


14

The River of Time by David Brin. Previously identified as the answers to People on different time streams and Story-identification, short story with time dilation. The story starts with people suddenly moving in very slow motion: I don't think anyone knows exactly when it began. It seemed a fatal disease, at first. Dozens, possibly hundreds, were buried ...


14

Passage for Piano by Frank Herbert. The main protagonist is Margaret Hatchell: Had some cosmic crystal gazer suggested to Margaret Hatchell that she would try to smuggle a concert grand piano onto the colony spaceship, she would have been shocked. Here she was at home in her kitchen on a hot summer afternoon, worried about how to squeeze ounces into her ...


14

The Universe Between, a 1965 novel by Alan E. Nourse, which was also the answer to this old question. It was based on the short story "High Threshold" in Astounding Science Fiction, March 1951 and the novelette "The Universe Between" in Astounding Science Fiction, September 1951, which are available at the Internet Archive here and here. ISFDB synopsis: ...


14

That is Flight into Space edited by Don Wollheim and published in 1950 by Frederick Fell. It's subtitled "Great Science-Fiction Stories of Interplanetary Travel" and just as you describe, has a story for the Sun, all nine planets, the Moon and the asteroids. The Sun creatures (in Sunward by Stanton A. Coblentz) are as you said, but the Plutonians (The Rape ...


13

This is The Recollection by Gareth L. Powell. When his brother disappears into a bizarre gateway on a London Underground escalator, failed artist Ed Rico and his brother's wife Alice have to put aside their feelings for each other to go and find him. Their quest through the 'arches' will send them hurtling through time, to new and terrifying alien worlds.


13

It's not by concentration, but by attempting to copy this "magic trick" through means psychic, scientific, and frankly mental. When he finally succeeds – in the very first few pages of the novel – this mechanism gets developed further into some sort of anti-gravity drive, and the inhabitants of Earth scatter around the universe. That's where the short ...


13

The first part of your question sounds like Icerigger by Alan Dean Foster - four humans are stranded on the planet TranKiKi after a botched kidnap attempt. To escape they have to travel halfway round the planet to a human settlement. Aided by the indigenous Tran, they travel on a large wooden iceship, running on skatelike runners. There are also two sequels -...


13

I may have found this. So far, I have been unable to find a summary of the story you were looking for, but it looks like it was written by Jim Shepard and published in the September, 1985 issue of Atlantic Monthly. If I can find more detail, I will add it. edit: it appears to be in his Batting Against Castro book, which is a collection of short stories. ...


13

This sounds like an Outer Limits episode called "The Duplicate Man", first aired in 1964. (Clone created to kill an alien animal, doesn't know he's a clone at first, I think I even remember the window part). It was based on "Good Night, Mister James", a novelette by Clifford Simak, published in 1951, available at the Internet Archive.


13

Sounds like the "Grinning Evil Death" short (Bob Sabiston, 1990) that I first saw on Season 1, Episode 1 of MTV's Liquid Television.


12

The Vision of Milty Boil by Howard Fast. I read it in his anthology The General Zapped an Angel. The eponymous Milty Boil is the developer who manages to get the minimum ceiling height reduced: And Milty made friends and built influence. By 1975, at the age of thirty-five, he was considered the most influential man in New York City. His influence was ...


12

"Mgamu", a short story by Lord Dunsany in his collection The Fourth Book of Jorkens. The story is told in the Billiards Club by Jorkens, who is repeating the story told him by a man named Polder who encountered the sivver-verri. "The sivver-verri," said Jorkens, "is described by the natives as a distinctly unpleasant beast. I have heard them describe him ...


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