62

As late as 1980, the year of publication for Expanded Universe, a book of fiction and essays, Heinlein made no apology for Starship Troopers. He attacked the book's critics as largely being unable to adequately understand written English. Heinlein also made a case for increasing the requirements for the franchise in some fashion and offered some serious ...


26

Yes, they destroyed the fifth planet in the solar system. The question was of greater interest because it had not been abstract art, but religious (in the Terran sense) and strongly emotional: it described the contact between the Martian Race and the people of the fifth planet, an event that had happened long ago but which was alive and important ...


25

First of all, we are talking about Starship Troopers, the book, right? Too bad they never made a movie based on it. ;) The society depicted in Starship Troopers seems fascist only at the first glance: military seems to be in power, and corporal punishment is widely used. However, people only get citizenship and suffrage after their military service, and ...


24

This is a reference to the Last Supper---there is a lot of oblique reference to the end of the story of Christ in the last chapters of the book. Mike is going out to be martyred. Or at least to have his body martyred as he discorporates in the martian fashion. Though it takes place off stage, we know that the finger is subsequently cooked into a soup to be ...


21

Your obvious negative opinion of Heinlein's ideas has led you into a false premise... The society of Starship Troopers isn't fascist, it's very clearly not a dictatorship. One of the points of the novel was to examine what a society might look like if voting was restricted by something other than age, but it's still a democratic society, not a totalitarian ...


14

I read people's responses here, and I cant believe that it seems everybody missed one important thing about the government set-up in Starship Troopers. i.e. that no one in the military had the right to vote while still serving in the military. Also, it was not just the military, but ANY federal service that you had to serve to earn your franchise. You only ...


14

lays out a view of the future where only the military is allowed full citizenship Citizenship is not about military. It is tied to responsibility. As it should. And opposite as we have it most places in today's world, especially where "democracy" reigns. And responsibility must be demonstrated up-start, and lasting as long as one's life. In the ST world ...


13

Near the end of chapter 4 Ben tells Jill one part of the story that he got from someone who read the Envoy log. Dr. Ward Smith delivered his wife of child by Caesarian section - and she died on the table. He seems to have worn his horns complacently until then. But what he did next shows that he knew the score; with the same scalpel he cut Captain ...


11

A couple sections later (xxxviii in my edition) Duke is stirring a small saucepan that holds a small amount of broth. Jubal asks, "Hmm... Mike?" And Duke answers, "Yup." Jubal and Duke share the broth. A communion with Mike. It was my understanding that the broth had been made from the finger Mike had left with Duke.


10

Re: Reconciling the differences: There is a clear difference in the settings: The Union in Troopers was engaged in a interstellar war, with at least three intelligent belligerents (Humans, Bugs and Skinnies). Stranger in a Strange Land was a first contact tale of a sorts (still clearly intra-system), with (at least as far was revealed) benign Martian aliens....


7

I always viewed this novel as one that, obviously, treated military service with a lot of respect. But I was never able to read it as an unequivocal advocation, even in-text, of military hierarchies (which seemed framed as a necessary evil) or the government portrayed there (kind of a mixed bag). Heinlein had quite a gift for setting up a speculative ...


6

I've looked through the uncut UK version published by Hodder & Stoughton Ltd. At appx. 220,000 words it's the most complete version I've seen. This is the first mention of the nickname "Stinky": Part II His Preposterous Heritage, Ch.21: “Or medicinal alcohol,” [ship’s surgeon Dr.] Nelson added. “Don’t let him pull your leg, Jubal. Stinky drinks ...


4

This is an attempt by Heinlein to show how a group, where every member of that group is capable of performing "miracles", would live on a day to day basis. The knife did, in fact go through Mike's finger, but there was no harm as Mike made it so that there was no damage and his finger was fully repaired immediately afterword. In this scene, Jubal is the only ...


3

The book indeed discusses that military service is not the only option for federal service. Chapter 12 pages 173-185 discuss this in OCS. The very placement of applicants seeking federal service in the beginning of the book covers this as well. History and moral philosophy does not promote war but simply illuminates the fact that war is a necessary evil. It ...


3

Actually, I think that Heinlein simply explores the questions raised by Nietzsche's writing. Stranger takes a look at the way the Ubermensch ("superman," the next stage of man) wields a power to change the world, whether he likes it or not; the world changes necessarily through the appearance of a transcendent, and democracy of ordinary people is little ...


3

There were 8 people on the Envoy, the original mission (part one, ch I): Captain Michael Brant, commanding—pilot, astrogator, relief cook, relief photographer, rocketry engineer; Dr. Winifred Coburn Brant, forty-one, semantician, practical nurse, stores officer, historian; Mr. Francis X. Seeney, twenty-eight, executive officer, second pilot, ...


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