99

Unfortunately, Amazon has made a dog's breakfast of Doctor Who, splitting up random Tennant episodes and the Christmas Specials into separate "shows" that should not be separate, splitting out various other miscellaneous items and combining them with unrelated materials, and even putting seasons in the wrong order. There is no difference between "the David ...


40

You can enjoy the show without having to watch anything in advance - as you mentioned yourself. That having said, Star Trek: Picard is dealing with a few themes that can be better understood by watching the movies and episodes listed below. TNG is a series of the 80s and 90s - since references between episodes are rare and most of the time everything is "...


35

In theory yes, but it's not recommended. You should at least know the basic shape of events in the Belgariad before you start the Malloreon. Fortunately, many (all?) editions of the Malloreon start with a prologue/introduction which summarises the Belgariad. So you can learn that overall shape quite easily, but you'd still be missing out on a lot. The ...


22

Isolation has no continuity with the prequels as far as I can remember. My advice to you is this: Watch Alien, the theatrical cut. Play Alien: Isolation. Read Alien: Out of the Shadows, set after Isolation but before Aliens. Read Alien: River of Pain, set after Out of the Shadows and acts as a direct precursor to Aliens. Watch Aliens, the director's cut. ...


15

The first several "boxed set" editions all used publication order. I grew up, for example, with the Collier editions. Wikipedia strongly implies that the first publisher to use the in-universe chronological order was Harper Books (now HarperCollins), when they acquired rights to the series in 1994. I have seen a set of the books published under the Fontana ...


10

In addition to Philipp's list, there's some other contextual episodes worth noting. TNG S4E03 Brothers. This helps to explain There are several inside references and jokes in PIC S1E09 and E10 that play off of that episode. You'll also need this to make sense of TNG S6E26 and S7E01 Descent (mentioned in the other answer) TNG S7E10 Inheritance helps a great ...


8

The first two movies should be enough. I can't think of anything in the game that isn't covered by them. Come to think of it, only the first movie would be required. You just need to roughly understand what happened to Ripley and co. and that corporations in the future are not nice people.


8

Aside from the answer above regarding Picard, the Borg, Seven, and androids, here are some other episodes dealing with the other big part of the show: the Romulans. The Original Series episode "Balance of Terror" introduces them. While the Romulans appeared previously in the Star Trek Enterprise, the fourth season episodes "Babel One", and "United" showed ...


5

Droids and Ewoks are not available to watch, as far as I'm aware. There was never an official DVD release of the entirety of either series, only a few episodes, and in any case they're no longer considered Canon and as such are unlikely to ever be rereleased. However, if you get your hands on the two DVD releases that included a pair of TV-movie-edits of ...


5

I haven't read the books or played the games, just generally aware of the basic idea. Watched the whole series with no problem. The only helpful fact (you can figure it out as you watch, but are never expressly told) that people who have experience might know is that the 3 main storylines are taking place at different times. They meet up eventually, but ...


5

As a bit of history. I read the Belgariad first and then, much later, I picked up book four of the Mallorean. There is apparently enough call back to previous events that I didn't really feel like I was missing information needed to enjoy the book. I did eventually go back and read all the prior books, and there were details that I had not known, but in ...


5

From personal experience: yes, it's fine. The Mallorean is perfectly understandable without reading The Belgariad and does not significantly suffer from the lack of having read it, or knowing anything about it, beforehand. I did read the rest of Edding's series later, and there were a few times reading The Belgariad that made things I'd read before in The ...


5

The book publisher (Orbit) recommends reading them in published order. What order should I read the series? We recommend reading both the novels and short fiction in publication order to avoid accidentally spoiling yourself for later books. https://www.orbitbooks.net/expanse-books-james-s-a-corey/#bookorder


4

According to HBO Showrunner Damon Lindelof you can enjoy the show with no prior knowledge of the graphic novels and associated materials (and film), but you'll enjoy it differently, note not better, if you've immersed yourself in the universe before approaching the show. DL: And I’m very curious how people with no preexisting relationship with the source ...


4

Yes. Though there are a ton of events that happen in the Belgariad that are referred in the Mallorean. Luckily, there are prologues that explain some things that's happened in the previous series, or gives some sort of explanation about the people/areas of the world.


4

There isn't really one Warhammer 40k is not a single series - instead, it contains lots of unrelated books written by different authors. There are of course some small series following one certain group of characters i.e. "Gaunt's Ghosts" which follows one Imperial Guard regiment or various "Omnibus" books (Ultramarines/Iron Warriors/Blood Angels/whatever) ...


3

While not strictly the book series (and not as universally acclaimed), the Walden Media film adaptations have so far been released in publication order - The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe in 2005, followed by Prince Caspian in 2008, followed by The Voyage of the Dawn Treader in 2010. The 1988 British TV series also uses publication order, beginning with ...


3

The Thursday Next books have more impact if you are familiar with the stories referred to. The Eyre Affair had 2 main books to brush up on: Jane Eyre and Martin Chuzzlewit. Lost in a Good Book has 10! I recommend Great Expectations, Adventures of Alice in Wonderland, and The Trial. But if you want to be thorough, read Jane Eyre, Tale of the Flopsy ...


3

Even though there are already three answers, one of which has been accepted, I'd like to give my preferred order. (Also, some books have been published after all these answers.) It is almost internal chronological order, but with a few exceptions that I will justify. First some remarks 1) Though Miles does not appear in "Ethan of Athos", this novel enters ...


3

My time has come. TL;DR: Anime season 1 is LNs 1-4. Season 2 is LNs 5-8. Read Progressive after watching seasons 1 and 2. Alicization eps 1-25 is LNs 9-14. Alicization: War of Underworld will presumably be LNs 15-18. Your four bullet points are mostly correct, though the Alicization anime added a handful of tie-ins to Ordinal Scale in its first few ...


2

Read the 5 novels in order first: Gateway Beyond the Blue Event Horizon Heechee Rendezvous The Annals of the Heechee The Boy Who Would Live Forever Then The Gateway Trip: Tales and Vignettes of the Heechee. The novels form your impression, view and comprehension of Pohl's universe. The short stories fill in the blanks, which you won't appreciate unless you ...


2

There is only one book in between Words of Radiance and Oathbringer, Edgedancer. While not strictly necessary, it is recommended as it sets up some characters for Oathbringer a little better than otherwise. I'd probably also recommend Warbreaker since it crosses over quite heavily with Words of Radiance and Oathbringer. As for these "six smaller books" I'm ...


2

Poking around, the order seems similar to this one in almost all cases: The Last Wish Sword of Destiny Season of Storms (optional) Blood of Elves Time of Contempt Baptism of Fire The Tower of the Swallow The Lady of the Lake That's mostly the chronological order, although The Last Wish was released slightly after Sword of Destiny, and ...


1

According to the showrunner, the series is designed to be accessible to viewers who're entirely new to the world of the Witcher, but enjoyable for existing fans. There's also been some substantial changes to the plotting (which is based entirely on the books, rather than the video games) to inject interest for book fans. Q. The Witcher games and books are ...


1

The show is a direct sequel, 30 years later, to the comic book Watchmen, and though it probably could be understood alone with no prior experience with its namesake, most of the references only make sense through that lens and a lot of the worldbuilding is already done and so it's probably intended that most viewers are familiar with it. The 2009 movie ...


1

Other than the main novels (Way of Kings, Words of Radiance and Oathbringer) the only other piece of fiction that's been published that's set on Roshar is Edgedancer, which is a novella that was part of Sanderson's Arcanum Unbounded collection. The "six smaller books" may be referring to other works set in Sanderson's Cosmere. Minor spoilers ahead... Many ...


1

I really just recommend reading in series order. So I'd start with any of these: Elantris (Elantris, short stories) His first published book. It is currently stand-alone, with sequels planned and two short stories. Elantris must be read before "The Hope of Elantris"1; it takes place partially after the ending, with extremely major spoilers. "The Emperor's ...


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