New answers tagged

-1

Subtle thing I noticed is that there does appear to be a way to suppress Supe powers. Spoiler alert: I'm wondering it this will be played up in future episodes.


2

That's an interesting question, because it led me to do some search and discover that what many consider the obvious reason -and I did too for many years- for many others is not even taken into consideration. And, I've not been able to find any kind of official answer too. Anyway...here I have to go by memory because I don't have the comics at hand reach. ...


3

Like most elements of Superman, this depends on the version you are speaking of [Golden Age, Silver Age, Bronze Age, and Modern Age; further to that, we have Post-Crisis, New 52 and Rebirth.] Various media would portray Kryptonians extent to the knowledge as anywhere from Common place to theoretical. I'll try to find some initial examples, then modify it ...


14

I haven't found anything explicit but in Action Comics Issues 848 and 849 Clark has a bit of a battle with faith and in it we get some insight into his early life in Smallville. In Issue 848 we get a few flashbacks to Clark as a child and in some of these we see him going to church. Click image to enlarge. In Issue 849 he stops by Smallville and has a talk ...


-1

A speedster can definitely phase through a Kryptonian. He just merely passes through Now if he really wants to hurt Superman, say pull out his organs, he just hurts himself. There is no way he can expect to materialize is hand in Superman's body. He would be trying to displace something that is much more durable than him. So, bottomline is that The Flash ...


0

The codex was essentially base level genetic information, which, frankly, could be carried by any living being. Getting stung by a bee, for instance, introduces trillions of bits of DNA coding from that specific hive into your system, but it won't make you any "stronger". I'm guessing Jor-el coded it into his son's cells so the genetic legacy of the planet ...


-1

In the comics, Kryptonians from hundreds of years before settled on the world of Daxam and interbred with the locals, producing a genetic offshoot known as the Daxamites. There existence is a major story element within the current CW Supergirl show canon.


0

A number of strong suggestions for this difference were provided in this wiki: https://superman.fandom.com/wiki/Clark_Kent It should be noted that this page uses a picture form the early 2000s series Superman: Secret Origin which has a less cartoonish or exaggerated, more "realistic" art style, putting everything from facial features and body proportions to ...


1

When we say "Clark Kent", I'm guessing we are speaking of his "mortal" persona. That being the case, I'm guessing we mean actual hobbies that he does to amuse himself, as well as stuff he does to "fit in" with that persona. There are several, actually, depending on what version you are speaking of. I'll try to provide example where able. Post-Crisis Clark ...


-1

As stated, the scene was highly metaphorical. In either case, though, it's unlikely that Superman was "drunk" on anything but the synthetic Kryptonite; canonically, unless he lost his powers, earth-based alcohol doesn't affect Kryptonians anymore than any other calories they ingest. Essentially, the "weakening" was to show the transfer of dominance back to ...


2

While the Super-Mobile is primarily a pre-Crisis device, it's made a couple (semi-whimsical) appearances post-crisis, mainly as meta in-jokes From Wiki - A few different versions of the Supermobile are seen protecting a futuristic Ivy Town in All-New Atom #8. The classic design of the vehicle can also be seen atop the sign of Funky Flashman's used ...


0

On another, but well related note, a very popular Web series, Because Science discussed exactly why having super strength and interacting with an everyday environment calibrated for regular strength would be difficult. Here, they used a base of about 100 times regular strength as a reference point, and pointed to Superman specifically as an example of how ...


2

This has been an established part of Superman's characterization since his earliest comics. The implication being he had to "learn" to manage his strength from the time of his boyhood, and apply only the barest fraction of it to function in every day life, let alone to dealing with mortals in any type of physical situation. There are several instances of ...


0

Superman and the Legion of Super-Heroes was a Geoff Johns story in Action Comics which featured a xenophobic future Earth, and a sun turned red using Sun Boy's abilities. Superman loses his powers, and recovers them at the proverbial last moment when Sun-Boy is released. Both this story and War of the Supermen play a bit fast and loose with the established ...


1

There was an episode of Superman:TAS called Solar Powered of which this was the exact basis. To Nutshell it: A human scientist called Edward Lytner takes on the persona of the villain Luminous and, seeking revenge on Superman who had put him into prison earlier, uses the Lex Corp satellites to diffuse the yellow rays of the sun and turn them red in earth's ...


1

There are some differences... Overall, superman's powers are stronger, but Homelander lacks a single weakness like Kryptonite for as far as we know. Superman has been show to be able to freeze things with his breath or to blow people away; Homelander does not seem capable of these things. Superman can lift massive objects even while flying, while ...


4

The primary difference is that Homelander was not born with his powers - he was created by the use of injecting the fetus with Compound V until their powers developed. Due to this, the Vought Superheroes don't have "Weaknesses", like Superman and Kryptonite. And Homelander is at the pinnacle of the Vought American heroes. His powers are: Superhuman ...


Top 50 recent answers are included