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55

As @Daniel Roseman points out in his comments, this has actually happened in the Children of Need special mini-episodes Space and Time (contained on a Doctor Who DVD and confirmed to be "canon" by Moffet). In this episode, an emergency landing causes the TARDIS to materialize in the "nearest safe location", which happens to be inside the control room of the ...


33

This is explained in "Time Crash", the 2007 Children in Need special, which takes place immediately before "Voyage of the Damned". The plot of the special revolves around the TARDIS from Tennant's era merging with the TARDIS from Peter Davison's (the Fifth Doctor's) era; Tennant explains how this is possible (emphasis mine): Doctor 5: In a minute we're ...


29

Since it's never happened on screen, any answer would be pure speculation. However, since we've frequently seen the Doctor open the Tardis door in deep space - in both classic and modern series - without the air rushing out, we can speculate that the same force would stop the water rushing in.


27

We actually see this in "Listen", where the TARDIS is opened underwater. With all of its systems working correctly, it simply remains trapped inside its own air bubble with the water held at a safe distance outside. As to how this is achieved; in the episode "Logopolis" there is a lengthy discussion of the doctor's plan to open the TARDIS doors underwater. ...


26

At least originally, keys scraped on a piano According to the person who made it: On how the Tardis should sound, he said: "I don't know who thought of it, but we came up with the 'rending of the fabric of time and space'. I was in a cinema and in the interval I had a programme and I drew it - exactly how I wanted it to go together. "I'd done ...


25

The TARDIS is placing a perception filter around itself. So the people can see it, but they won't notice it. They're just not paying any attention. This explains why people explicitly looking for it can also find it. The perception filter is working very subtle. It was mentioned couple of times in the newer seasons, but I can't find a quote right now. This ...


24

No. Being infinitely spacious in no way means it contains all possible universes. It just means the TARDIS is physically infinite, in that it goes on forever. Nothing about "everything that can happen, does happen" or whatnot, just infinite rooms and space to put things like a pool, a library, etc. 11TH DOCTOR: Picture the biggest ship you’ve ever seen. ...


22

Knowing the Doctor's quirky sense of humor, it may indeed be the TARDIS making a translation, but it could also be the Doctor using 'Stormaggedon' to make a point in the conversation. Given what we know about human development, the child should still lack the cognitive abilities to formulate such complex thoughts. In any conversation with the Doctor, it ...


22

The TARDIS does not hate Clara, that is Clara's perception of their interactions. The TARDIS exists throughout time and space. This is a difficult concept for linear beings like humans to understand or accept. The TARDIS is able to see the entirety of her own existence through the Time Vortex as well as her relationship to the Doctor, so for her, there are ...


22

The Tenth Doctor's regeneration was an unusually violent one. It's established that Time Lords have some control over their regenerations. For example, in the classic episode Destiny of the Daleks, Romana (a Time Lady and the Doctor’s companions) regenerated about half a dozen times until she found an appearance that she liked. In this instance, the Tenth ...


21

The TARDIS translates for everyone (as Rose explains in "The Christmas Invasion", when the Doctor regains consciousness and they can understand the Sycorax). So if Amy can't understand her baby, and Craig can't understand Stormageddon, when the Doctor can, it follows that the Doctor knows Baby, and the TARDIS isn't translating for him on this occasion.


21

A lot of Doctor Who episodes are written by "guest writers", which basically just means that they're not regular DW writers. In any case, no matter who writes the episode, whether it's a normal DW writer or not, Steven Moffat, the current Doctor Who showrunner, signs off on the script to ensure continuity (well, as much continuity as one can get in a 48-year-...


21

There are definitely times when The Doctor has control of the Tardis and it goes exactly where he wants it to. For instance, in The End of the World he chooses to go to the day when the sun will expand and destroy Earth, and arrives there exactly as planned. However, the Tardis does go to places that the Doctor did not intend, as you pointed out. In The ...


21

tl;dr: For calls to the TARDIS itself, the TARDIS appears to route them "intelligently", patching them through when they are most needed. For calls using the souped-up cell phones, they appear to happen in "real companion time". TARDIS Direct Calls As far as we can tell, phone calls into the TARDIS get connected "when they're supposed to be", without any ...


21

We only know of one instance where the destruction of a Tardis destroyed the universe, specifically in The Pandorica Opens and The Big Bang. We know of other instances where Tardises have been destroyed, as House is littered with broken Tardises in The Doctor's Wife. From that alone, we can conclude that it is possible to destroy a Tardis without taking the ...


20

At the end of The Doctor's Wife, the TARDIS points out that she will never be able to personally speak to The Doctor as a stand-alone, sentient being. However, we have already seen that the TARDIS is capable of interacting in the form of an image of a person, in a form of voice-activated interface. We've seen The TARDIS play back holograms of The Doctor on ...


19

Because the average Time Lord has only thirteen versions of themselves, and since the 11th Doctor is actually the 13th, it means his timeline stops at Trenzalore: his death. That's why Clara never saw the 12th Doctor, because is he is slightly derived from the Doctor's apparent "fate". The Time Lords saved the Doctor by giving him a second regeneration ...


19

Conceptually the TARDIS does not have crazy mass in our Universe because most of it ISN'T IN OUR UNIVERSE. We have seen the TARDIS carried off multiple times, in something small as a flatbed truck. In Flatline, when the TARDIS was losing "dimensional energy" the outer representation (and that is all the shell of the TARDIS is; a representation of a portal ...


18

Technically not always, in "An Unearthly Child" we are introduced to the TARDIS and it appears it is the first time the chameleon circuit has failed. The Doctor says: It's still a police box. Why hasn't it changed? Dear, dear, how very disturbing. This establishes that the TARDIS is now stuck as a police box, but Susan reveals that it wasn't always a ...


18

I'm assuming you're talking about the Doctor's actions at the control panel, versus his general ability to land where he expects to land. The visual of the Doctor bounding around the TARDIS console, flailing at controls began with Patrick Troughton, and was probably inspired by his energetic portrayal (Relative to the reserved and dignified Hartnell, at ...


18

It varies. Wildly. The Doctor took a course on how to pilot a TARDIS. He failed. The instruction manual for the TARDIS was flung into a supernova. The TARDIS seats six drivers. The Doctor works all six stations himself. The TARDIS does have a mind of its own, which when introduced empatically states that it takes the Doctor where he needs to go rather ...


16

Yes, The Doctor's TARDIS was inside the Clara's TARDIS and it's not the first time it happened. Time Crash shows a different thing (i.e. Crash of the same TARDIS from different time). It's not landing one TARDIS into another. Here are some previous incidents in which one TARDIS landed into another: In The Doctor's Wife episode of new Doctor Who (2005), The ...


15

This is mostly a topology question. For simpler examples, you might take a look at a Moebius strip or a Klein bottle. It's difficult to explain, our brain circuitry has evolved to understand mundane 3d space and doesn't deal well with such things. But the big blue police box would just be sitting there in the control room, with the exit door twisting back ...


15

The look, feel and even control systems of the TARDIS seem to change according to the whim of the current incarnation of the Doctor. In the minisode "Time Crash", the fifth Doctor compares the control room's appearance to that of a computer's desktop theme; FIVE: What have you done to my TARDIS? You've changed the desktop theme, haven't you? What's ...


15

Time and Relative Dimensions In Space - TARDIS We've seen plenty of episodes where the TARDIS is enormous. In fact, the episode The Name of the Doctor gives us a hint that it's not just bigger on the inside, it's HUGE (size leak) The catch here is that's not just a star, it's a collapsing star. From Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS DOCTOR: The Eye of ...


14

As you say, Time Crash had the 5th and 10th Doctors’ TARDISes crash into each other. That’s presumably different from, and much worse than, one TARDIS materialising around another TARDIS, which I’d guess is how Clara and Me managed to transport the Doctor’s TARDIS from London to the desert. I think this is plausible — in our universe, there’s a difference ...


13

That would be Journey to the Center of the TARDIS. The 'tree' was where the TARDIS basically grew new components as needed.


13

Ashildr is not flying the TARDIS. Clara is. From the very end of the episode (emphasis mine) CLARA: Mind you, seeing as I'm not actually ageing, there's a tiny little bit of wiggle room, isn't there? ASHILDR: Wiggle room? CLARA: Wiggle room. Yeah, you know, wiggle room. We could, er, you know, stop off on the way. (Clara sets coordinates.) ...


13

No. Infinity is not Everything. Think of it like this: There are infinitely many even numbers, yet not all numbers are even.


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