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5

The short story is almost undoubtedly "The Great Engine" (1943) by A. E. van Vogt. It was subsequently used as the first part of the novel The Beast (1963). The story was first published in Astounding, July 1943 and can be read at the Internet Archive. He climbed to the top of the hill and came down again carrying a piece of deadwood about four ...


2

Due to the molecular structure being unstable during the replication process As others have referenced before me, the TNG novel, Balance of Power, by Dafydd Ab Hugh, references this as part of the plot. Riker stared at the display, rubbing his beard in agitation. "Data, do you understand the implication of this? You know why latinum is the standard ...


4

This may be a bit of a stretch, but 1843's 'A Christmas Carol' by Charles Dickens involves a ghost from the future transporting the main character forward in time to observe the outcome of his decisions, then returns him to present for the explicit purpose of improving his social and emotional progress (and as a result, the betterment of the society around ...


1

You may want to consider Philip Nowlan's books Armageddon 2419 A.D. and The Air Lords of Han. It is the Buck Rogers story where he travels forward in time to help after an apocalypse.


61

How about Prometheus, a Celestial being who came to Earth and transformed humanity by introducing fire? Stories of Prometheus in written form are known from 2800 years ago, and there must be older undocumented versions. The best known is the trilogy by Aeschylus, of which only "Prometheus Bound" survives (date uncertain bur prior to 430 BCE).


38

I think a good first upper bound would be 1889: Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. It doesn't work in the end, but as noted in the Wikipedia entry Hank, who had an image of that time that had been colored over the years by romantic myths, takes on the task of analyzing the problems and sharing his knowledge from 1300 years in the ...


-1

The technology would have been removed from the Enterprise for reverse engineering by Starfleet, and eventual inclusion in future starships. Hence the Excelsior had "Transwarp" drive in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. But some of the more easily analyzed technology might have remained aboard the Enterprise (especially if it would have been ...


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