44

Other than the exact text of the rhyme, it sounds like a perfect match for Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man. The main character wants to commit a crime in a world of telepaths and needs to keep it secret, so he fills his head with a catchy bit of verse -- a mindworm. Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Demolished_Man The mindworm is: Eight, ...


35

Not normally, but once he has the emotion chip it's uncertain. From TNG 7x01, Descent, Part II: Deanna Troi: Data, I can sense feelings in you. Data: Yes. My brother has made that possible. This means that despite their robotic nature, when Soong-type androids feel emotions it can be sensed by a half-Betazoid - the same as with regular biological ...


34

Could it be Philip K. Dick's "Our Friends from Frolix 8" (1970)? It was about telepaths ruling the normals, and the cover sort of fits, but I don't remember the details of the plot that well.


33

This is Asimov's Green Patches aka Misbegotten Missionary. It ends with the little organism mimicking a wire thinking The main air locks were about to be opened -- And all thought ceased. As you mention, sadly for the organism, it picked the airlock door wire to mimic.


33

This is John Wyndham's The Chrysalids (1955). Set in a post-apocalyptic Labrador, the protagonist David and his telepathic friends try to hide their abilities from their rabidly anti-mutant neighbours. His younger sister Petra is a strong enough telepath to reach all the way around the world to New Zealand, where a society of telepaths are growing. They are ...


28

I don’t have canon evidence to back this up, but I think it probably comes down to a matter of legality and ethics. We know that you can’t use Veritaserum on students. We know that the use of Veritaserum on students is regulated (thanks ike and Mac in the comments for correcting me). In a similar way, I’d expect Legilimency to be restricted, perhaps even ...


27

No. We see in the Star Trek: The Next Generation Season 3. Episode 20 "Tin Man" that even the most powerful of Betazoids, Tam Elbrun, cannot read Data. Hence it would be extremely unlikely that Lwaxana would be able to read Data. From the Wiki site: "En route, Elbrun finds it impossible to filter out the thoughts of the Enterprise crew, but when meeting ...


26

"The New Wine", a short story by John Christopher. It has appeared in a number of anthologies and collections; any of these covers look familiar? At the beginning of the story, the first interstellar expedition is about to leave for Procyon: "That time factor," she said, "is it certain? I don't understand mathematics; to me it seems fantastic." "I ...


25

Could this be The Game of Rat and Dragon by Cordwainer Smith? The story takes place in the far future. Human travel in outer space is threatened by strange creatures known as the Dragons. Imperceptible to ordinary people, Dragons are experienced as nothing but a sudden death or insanity. Dragons can only be destroyed by very strong light, but they ...


19

Pure conjecture: Data's positronic pathways are designed to mimic, as closely as possible, the human brain. As such, when he is given emotions through the interactions of the emotion chip with his positronic circuits, the electrical impulses are similar enough to way in which electrical impulses travel along human (and presumably Betazed) neural pathways ...


15

Yes. Time Lords have possessed psychic ability as demonstrated going all the way back to the 2nd Doctor, Patrick Troughton, when in "The War Games", The Doctor sent an emergency message* to Gallifrey upon discovering the true nature of the Games. DOCTOR: The only people who can put an end to this whole ghastly business and send everyone back to their own ...


15

I knew I knew it! This is one of the stories in Psi High and Others by Alan Nourse. While "The Watchers" from the Galactic Confederation patiently await the verdict -- freedom or "Quarantine" for earth, they review man's reaction to three past crises. In the "Martyr" we have a portrait of a civilization on the brink of immortality through the discovery of ...


15

This is the 1976 novel Mindbridge by Joe Haldeman. The planet circles Groombridge 1618 and the small alien creatures are called "bridges." The explorers (called "Tamers") wear powered suits. Humanity ends up encountering an advanced race called the L'vrai; the main character Jacque and the bridges are key to communicating with them. This book is full of ...


15

You're describing E. Michael Blake's Science Fiction for Telepaths (reproduced in full below) Science Fiction for Telepaths 1 1 Well, you know what I mean. It was published in 100 Great Science Fiction Short Short Stories, edited by Isaac Asimov.


15

The Destiny Makers series by Mike Shupp From goodreads review of the first book, With Fate Conspire: The novel tells the story of college kid named Tim who mysteriously finds himself in the bubble of a time machine. The actual mechanism of the time machine seems to be in the dorm room below his own. The time machine allows him to walk 90,000 years into the ...


15

This is the plot of A.E. Van Vogt's 1940 novel Slan. There are two types of "Slans": one type has golden antenna-like "tendrils" that they try to hide, but not always successfully, the way that you describe. Because of their psychic powers and their obvious difference, the main antagonist, world dictator Kier Grey, has the slans hunted to near extinction. ...


13

The story is "Second Dawn" by Arthur C. Clarke, originally published in Science Fiction Quarterly in 1951 A full copy of the text can be found here


13

It sounds like this scene from Alfred bester's The Demolished Man. It's a fairly short (by today's standards, anyway) novel first serialized in January 1952 in Galaxy Science Fiction magazine. chapter 7: The usual line was assembled in the anteroom of the Esper Guild Institute when Lincoln Powell entered. The hopeful hundreds, all ages, all sexes, ...


13

This is Eric Frank Russell's Sinister Barrier which first appeared in Unknown in 1939. See Wikipedia. Your description is spot-on: Scientists dying apparently randomly, eye treatments, which allow one to see the Vitons (so named) as floating globes of light, and final human victory with antennas sending a beam of radio energy which disrupts them. (Russell ...


12

The Forgotten Door by Alexander Key. 1965 Scholastic Books. A wonderful book that I just finished reading to my daughter and her friend. I had remembered it from when I first read it in 1968. The boy falls through a forgotten "doorway" between worlds that had been long abandoned by his people. He loses his memory from the accident and is taken in by a ...


12

I believe this was my once long-lost book as well. I found it while looking for an answer to another question on this site. I can't really confirm the details as it's been forever since I read it from my elementary school library. I would love to find an affordable copy. "The Rock of Three Planets" by A. M. Lightner, published in 1963. It is apparently the ...


12

"Baby Is Three", a 1952 novella by Theodore Sturgeon; first published in Galaxy Science Fiction, October 1952, available at the Internet Archive; expanded into the 1953 novel More Than Human. You may have read the novella in the original magazine, or in the 1953 anthology Children of Wonder edited by William Tenn. Wikipedia summary: The story describes ...


11

This is Cobwebs, by Ray Brown. It was in the August 1987 Analog. I seem to recall a conversation between the main character and one of the aliens, explaining that the human telepaths are refugees from persecution back on Earth. He gets the dusty response that they ought to be more philosophic and accept inevitable death without making a fuss. "If we had ...


11

According to the strip's creator, Jon doesn't understand Garfield, but he does understand his actions. Jim: I wanted to ride that real fine line between wanting to understand what the cat says, I think people honestly feel that cats think in English, that cats understand everything as they do but obviously they don't talk so I wanted to ride that line ...


10

I think you mean the following story: Subjugation by James Galloway (Fel). Every detail of your question matches The story contains elf-like blue aliens: The Faey representative, a high-ranking military officer, was a breathtakingly lovely human-looking female with light blue skin and pointed ears. However they can turn purple if embarassed or angry: ...


10

It is probably unethical for Snape to invade the mind of a student. He did it in Half-Blood Prince because Harry had injured another student (Malfoy). Without cause, he likely isn't allowed to read the minds of the students willy nilly. Snape may not have personal ethics, but if he invades Harry's mind without justification, there might be repercussions ...


10

That would be Coils, by Roger Zelazny and Fred Saberhagen. The woman with the Telepathic abilities (who tended to give herself away by projecting the smells of flowers) was 'Ann'; the being that watched over him was not really revealed (in detail) until the end of the book, but was hinted at a number of times -- he's basically a consciousness that ...


10

This is Coils by Roger Zelazny. The protagonist was once part of a group of "special" people created or found by a government agency for "special operations" -- but someone he got cashiered and his memory wiped. One of the catch-words that repeats when the protagonist is applying his mental connection to anything digital (which is ...


9

I think this is the answer: Published in 1952, Andre Norton’s Star Man’s Son (also known as Daybreak 2250), is an early post-nuclear-war novel that follows a young man, Fors, in search of lost knowledge. Fors begins his Arthurian quest through a radiation-ravaged landscape with the aid of a telepathic mutant cat. He encounters mutated creatures ...


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