43

Other than the exact text of the rhyme, it sounds like a perfect match for Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man. The main character wants to commit a crime in a world of telepaths and needs to keep it secret, so he fills his head with a catchy bit of verse -- a mindworm. Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Demolished_Man The mindworm is: Eight, ...


35

Could it be Philip K. Dick's "Our Friends from Frolix 8" (1970)? It was about telepaths ruling the normals, and the cover sort of fits, but I don't remember the details of the plot that well.


34

Not normally, but once he has the emotion chip it's uncertain. From TNG 7x01, Descent, Part II: Deanna Troi: Data, I can sense feelings in you. Data: Yes. My brother has made that possible. This means that despite their robotic nature, when Soong-type androids feel emotions it can be sensed by a half-Betazoid - the same as with regular biological ...


30

This is Asimov's Green Patches aka Misbegotten Missionary. It ends with the little organism mimicking a wire thinking The main air locks were about to be opened -- And all thought ceased. As you mention, sadly for the organism, it picked the airlock door wire to mimic.


27

I don’t have canon evidence to back this up, but I think it probably comes down to a matter of legality and ethics. We know that you can’t use Veritaserum on students. We know that the use of Veritaserum on students is regulated (thanks ike and Mac in the comments for correcting me). In a similar way, I’d expect Legilimency to be restricted, perhaps even ...


26

No. We see in the Star Trek: The Next Generation Season 3. Episode 20 "Tin Man" that even the most powerful of Betazoids, Tam Elbrun, cannot read Data. Hence it would be extremely unlikely that Lwaxana would be able to read Data. From the Wiki site: "En route, Elbrun finds it impossible to filter out the thoughts of the Enterprise crew, but when meeting ...


26

"The New Wine", a short story by John Christopher. It has appeared in a number of anthologies and collections; any of these covers look familiar? At the beginning of the story, the first interstellar expedition is about to leave for Procyon: "That time factor," she said, "is it certain? I don't understand mathematics; to me it seems fantastic." "I ...


23

Could this be The Game of Rat and Dragon by Cordwainer Smith? The story takes place in the far future. Human travel in outer space is threatened by strange creatures known as the Dragons. Imperceptible to ordinary people, Dragons are experienced as nothing but a sudden death or insanity. Dragons can only be destroyed by very strong light, but they ...


19

Pure conjecture: Data's positronic pathways are designed to mimic, as closely as possible, the human brain. As such, when he is given emotions through the interactions of the emotion chip with his positronic circuits, the electrical impulses are similar enough to way in which electrical impulses travel along human (and presumably Betazed) neural pathways ...


15

You're describing E. Michael Blake's Science Fiction for Telepaths (reproduced in full below) Science Fiction for Telepaths 1 1 Well, you know what I mean. It was published in 100 Great Science Fiction Short Short Stories, edited by Isaac Asimov.


13

They used to have telepathic abilities, but not anymore. Expanded universe reference on Memory Alpha states: It is explained in Vulcan's Soul that the Romulans rejected the telepathy of the Vulcans and slaughtered or enslaved the telepathic ones among them during their exodus to the Romulan system: the telepaths became the Remans.


13

Yes. Time Lords have possessed psychic ability as demonstrated going all the way back to the 2nd Doctor, Patrick Troughton, when in "The War Games", The Doctor sent an emergency message* to Gallifrey upon discovering the true nature of the Games. DOCTOR: The only people who can put an end to this whole ghastly business and send everyone back to their own ...


13

This is the 1976 novel Mindbridge by Joe Haldeman. The planet circles Groombridge 1618 and the small alien creatures are called "bridges." The explorers (called "Tamers") wear powered suits. Humanity ends up encountering an advanced race called the L'vrai; the main character Jacque and the bridges are key to communicating with them. This book is full of ...


13

This is Eric Frank Russell's Sinister Barrier which first appeared in Unknown in 1939. See Wikipedia. Your description is spot-on: Scientists dying apparently randomly, eye treatments, which allow one to see the Vitons (so named) as floating globes of light, and final human victory with antennas sending a beam of radio energy which disrupts them. (Russell ...


12

The story is "Second Dawn" by Arthur C. Clarke, originally published in Science Fiction Quarterly in 1951 A full copy of the text can be found here


12

The Forgotten Door by Alexander Key. 1965 Scholastic Books. A wonderful book that I just finished reading to my daughter and her friend. I had remembered it from when I first read it in 1968. The boy falls through a forgotten "doorway" between worlds that had been long abandoned by his people. He loses his memory from the accident and is taken in by a ...


12

I believe this was my once long-lost book as well. I found it while looking for an answer to another question on this site. I can't really confirm the details as it's been forever since I read it from my elementary school library. I would love to find an affordable copy. "The Rock of Three Planets" by A. M. Lightner, published in 1963. It is apparently the ...


12

"Baby Is Three", a 1952 novella by Theodore Sturgeon; first published in Galaxy Science Fiction, October 1952, available at the Internet Archive; expanded into the 1953 novel More Than Human. You may have read the novella in the original magazine, or in the 1953 anthology Children of Wonder edited by William Tenn. Wikipedia summary: The story describes ...


11

It sounds like this scene from Alfred bester's The Demolished Man. It's a fairly short (by today's standards, anyway) novel first serialized in January 1952 in Galaxy Science Fiction magazine. chapter 7: The usual line was assembled in the anteroom of the Esper Guild Institute when Lincoln Powell entered. The hopeful hundreds, all ages, all sexes, ...


11

I knew I knew it! This is one of the stories in Psi High and Others by Alan Nourse. While "The Watchers" from the Galactic Confederation patiently await the verdict -- freedom or "Quarantine" for earth, they review man's reaction to three past crises. In the "Martyr" we have a portrait of a civilization on the brink of immortality through the discovery of ...


10

Chocky, a 1984 UK live-action, seems to somewhat fit this. From the Wikipedia article: Chocky: Matthew Gore is an intelligent boy chosen by a mysterious extraterrestrial visitor to be a source of information about life on Earth. As his schoolwork and artistic talent improve dramatically he arouses the suspicion of powerful groups who wish to tap into ...


10

Permission is required, but that doesn't mean it's always acquired. The rules are never comprehensively laid out, but they're referenced a few different ways. For example, in "A Race Through Dark Places" (s02e08): Bester: I think they'll do as we ask. Talia: You seem awfully confident. Bester: I am. Talia: Did you scan them? Bester: ...


9

I think you mean the following story: Subjugation by James Galloway (Fel). Every detail of your question matches The story contains elf-like blue aliens: The Faey representative, a high-ranking military officer, was a breathtakingly lovely human-looking female with light blue skin and pointed ears. However they can turn purple if embarassed or angry: ...


9

That's Octavia Butler's Patternist series, probably the first one, Patternmaster.


9

That would be Coils, by Roger Zelazny and Fred Saberhagen. The woman with the Telepathic abilities (who tended to give herself away by projecting the smells of flowers) was 'Ann'; the being that watched over him was not really revealed (in detail) until the end of the book, but was hinted at a number of times -- he's basically a consciousness that ...


9

Two of the comments already mention Dan Simmons, but I'm pretty sure this is his book The Hollow Man. It narrates the story of a university lecturer who has the ability to "hear" the thoughts of others, an ability he shares with his dying wife. Here's the steel teeth: ch. There Are No Eyes Here : “Jesus!” He pulled back instinctively and opened his ...


9

I think this is the answer: Published in 1952, Andre Norton’s Star Man’s Son (also known as Daybreak 2250), is an early post-nuclear-war novel that follows a young man, Fors, in search of lost knowledge. Fors begins his Arthurian quest through a radiation-ravaged landscape with the aid of a telepathic mutant cat. He encounters mutated creatures ...


9

Commercial telepaths Almost certainly, the majority of Psi Corps members are commercial telepaths. Babylon 5 episodes repeatedly demonstrate that business negotiations rarely take place without the presence of trained, Psi Corps-licensed telepaths to ensure the good intentions of both sides of the negotiating table. Hence, there is a strong demand for ...


9

This sounds like John D. MacDonald's novel Wine of the Dreamers (aka Planet of the Dreamers), originally published (probably in a shorter form) in Startling Stories, May 1950 which is available at the Internet Archive. Maybe one of these covers will ring a bell. Plot summary from Wikipedia: The book is set both on Earth (dealing with a top-secret military ...


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