44

Because it isn't necessary. Intraship transport is relegated to medical and security emergencies. There are a limited number of transporters available and such energy is more vital to other services on the ship such as shields or the warp engines. Despite the relative abundance of energy in the Federation universe, it still costs energy to convert people ...


37

Sorry TangoOversway, but... Physically: yes, the original is lost. "Death" is overkill, though. Based solely on onscreen evidence, it's more accurate to say that the original is recycled. First: Matter is not directly transmitted as energy and reconstructed as-is. Most likely it's simply used as an energy-saving mechanism during 99.999+% of transports. ...


27

This is from the Star Trek: The Next Generation Writers' Technical Manual, Fourth Season Edition. This is one of the Writers' Guides. In other words, it tells the writers what they can and cannot do on screen. (And yes, this is a bit long, but I'm including source material and explaining my reasoning.) (This information is also from past answers, so for ...


25

In Star Trek, transporters convert a person or object into an energy pattern (a process called dematerialization), then "beam" it to a target, where it is reconverted into matter (rematerialization) (source Wikipedia). Therefore, the original is not destroyed, only converted into energy (E=MC^2), transported (or stored in safe - TNG:Relics) and ...


24

This is almost certainly The Infinitive of Go, by John Brunner. From the plot summary: For the first significant test using a live person, a diplomatic agent is Posted to a foreign embassy from the USA. The test is an abject failure: the agent, George Gunther, is unexpectedly armed and also demands a countersign upon arriving at his destination. Since ...


23

There were no shields available during the transport. The last volley tore a hole in the hull of the Enterprise on the engineering deck and depleted the last of her shield power. The fact that Enterprise could no longer prevent damage to her hull implies her shield power is gone. Note the resignation of the crew as the transport takes place. There isn't ...


21

Starfleet vessels are just too small to merit the expenditure of energy on site-to-site transporters when simple turbolifts are sufficient. Star Trek production illustrator Doug Drexler, when discussing the next (next) generation of Starfleet vessels identified that the Enterprise-J would use transporters as the primary method of moving people around. He ...


20

That's the beginning of the Commonwealth Saga by Peter F Hamilton, which comes up so often in story identification requests that it should perhaps be a FAQ.


18

This is probably Harry Harrison's One Step From Earth. The stories range from the earliest tests to a point where the doors (called "Matter Transmitter" or MT for short) are just a given and humanity has spread out across the universe. The stories are One Step From Earth An explorer, sent to Mars through one of the first MTs, prefers to stay there and ...


18

I think you are remembering an older book (written in 1948), by A. E. van Vogt: The World of Null-A. The main characters starts the book by going to a city where a machine will be testing people (referred to as the 'Games') and selecting those with sufficient aptitude for further training/work on Venus. Our hero (Gilbert Gosseyn) discovers that his ...


16

I'm going to my source for this, one I've cited here before, the Star Trek: The Next Generation Writers' Technical Manual, Fourth Season Edition. This is one of the Writers' Guides. In other words, it tells the writers what they can and cannot do on screen. (This information is also from recent answers, so for more related details, see this answer and this ...


15

I can think of two instances which give a greater range than Earth to LEO. That gives a lower bound on the range: Season 3 Episode 12 Jolinar's Memories gives a range from the surface of a planet to the moon. We don't know specifics of the system, but the range from Earth to Luna is about 1 lightsecond. Season 8 Episode 10 Endgame is a bit unclear about ...


14

Azazel is, in the canon Marvel Universe, a demon-like mutant called a Neyaphem and father to Nightcrawler. The complete range of abilities available to the Neyaphem species is unknown. Being an immortal, demon-like mutant may grant him several powers his hybrid human son may not possess. It is also hinted that Azazel may have absorbed some of the powers of ...


13

The Spot is one of Spider-Man's most difficult adversaries. While his abilities aren't clearly defined as "Teleportation" they do function in almost the same way as Nightcrawler's They both open portals to alternate dimensions then transit through said portal to an exit point at a different location. The main difference between the two is the level of ...


13

This is Harry Harrison's One Step From Earth if I'm not mistaken. The end story deals with people with 12 fingers. Can't say more without it being a spoiler.


12

Yes, David's choice of locations was limited. The movie Jumper was very loosely based on the Steven Gould novel of the same name. Assuming David had the same ability as in the novel, he was limited to jumping to places he had direct memory of. David used a collection of video recordings to help his memory, but he still needed to have visited the jump site ...


12

This was the Professor Gamma series, written by the astronomer Sir Fred Hoyle and his son Geoffrey and published by Ladybird (in the UK, at least, and I recall them being quite British in a Professor Quatermass/Doctor Who style, so I think it's unlikely they were published elsewhere). The series of four books was: The Frozen Planet of Azuron The Planet of ...


12

This is Ecodeath (1972) by William Jon Watkins & E. V. Snyder. An ecoescape story about Watkins and Snyder (when they weren't writing this book) who both can "Jump" into time. Watkins has lost his wife and child to the poison bloom of one Ashley's firm and is determined to get him; Ashley hires Snyder to kill Watkins, but before they're through ...


12

I think you are thinking of "Via Vortex" by John Meaney, included in Lou Anders' anthology Sideways in Crime. From the Strange Horizons synopsis/review: John Meaney's "Via Vortex" pulls a switch on the familiar "if the Nazis won WWII" by having the Nazis be both Germans and Americans (or Amerikans). The Allies—England and France, it seems—won somehow by ...


11

This is The Enemy Stars by Poul Anderson. You've remembered a few highlights from the book, and the plot is a lot more involved than your question suggests. The teleporter accident is at the end of chapter 16: A being stood in the receiving chamber. It wore some kind of armor, so he could not make out the shape very well, but though it stood on two legs ...


11

The story of which you are thinking sounds like Kenneth Bulmer's Behold the Stars (1965), which was previously asked about and successfully answered here. The protagonist does use a kind of teleport gate to service ummanned sublight "carrier" spacecraft: A fraction of a second before he had been standing on concrete, deep within the Earth, surrounded ...


10

It is the Improbability Drive that picked them up. As Trillian tells Zaphod when they pick up Ford and Arthur in THHGTG: "Improbability Drive," she said patiently. "You explained it to me yourself. We pass through every point in the Universe, you know that." So every point in the universe can be anywhere/anywhen in time-space. As evilsoup pointed out, ...


9

I think you may be referring to a book by Jerry Sohl called Costigan’s Needle The original copyright is 1953. My particular copy has a publication date of August 1968. There's a Kindle edition on Amazon for $8.99 and they also have some used paperbacks starting at about $16.


9

For non-mathematicians the way to understand the shape of a wormhole is to start in two dimensions where we can represent space by a flat sheet. A wormhole is where two parallel sheets are joined together. This diagram (attempts!) to show how the wormhole joins the two sheets: Start with the two sheets representing the two different regions of spacetime, ...


9

I believe the answer is indeed Raymond E. Bank's "Rabbits to the Moon". Here's a description from an article about teleportation mishaps: Published in 1959, Raymond E. Banks’ “Rabbits to the Moon” echoes Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Disintegration Machine” (1929) in its depiction of the device as capable of distinguishing between different types of ...


9

This is the Council Wars series by John Ringo. The first book is titled There Will Be Dragons From the Goodreads review for the series: In the future there is no want, no war, no disease nor ill-timed death. The world is a paradise—and then, in a moment, it ends. The council that controls the Net falls out and goes to war. Everywhere people who have ...


8

That is the Reformed Sufi series by Ray Brown, consisting of the following stories: A Change of Employment (short story), Analog, August 1982 Looking for the Celestial Master (novelette), Analog, September 1982 Credos (novella), Analog, August 1983 Identity Crisis (novelette), Analog, Mid-September 1983 Apparently these stories are only available in ...


8

It's not a perfect match (no force fields), but I think the story you want is "Loophole" by Arthur C. Clarke, first published in Astounding Science Fiction, April 1946, available at the Internet Archive. Here is a plot summary from Wikipedia: The story begins in the form of correspondence between the President of Mars and the Secretary of the Martian ...


8

Frank Herbert's Whipping Star, published 1970. From Wikipedia: After suffering under a tyrannous pure democracy which had the power to create laws so fast that no thought could be given to the effects, the sentients of the galaxy found the need for a Bureau of Sabotage (BuSab) to slow the wheels of government, thereby preventing it from ...


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