129

TV Tropes calls it "Famous, Famous, Fictional." The trope description does not cite any other name, which means there almost certainly is not another commonly used term for it. (The trope descriptions are generally quite good about citing more traditional terminology for such things.)


88

As per this RPG SE question, the first adventure was in a dungeon under a keep, and the name stuck. According to Gary Gygax (in an interview with Dungeon #112), the first dungeon crawl was part of a wargame in which the invading force entered the enemy's castle through a former escape tunnel dug from the fortress's dungeon. The group had so much fun with ...


78

It seems that Spock mis-pronounced the word A search on Memory Alpha and Beta shows there is no such thing as a 'marshmellon' referenced elsewhere on those sites. As further evidence for this, considering the following: In the 23rd Century, they have a marshmallow dispenser. The Memory Alpha page for Marshmallow (yes, that is a page surprisingly enough) ...


73

"...wiped my face with a planet" means exactly what it says, from when Thanos brought a planet (actually one of Titan's moons1) down on Tony during their battle in Avengers: Infinity War. As mentioned by @systemexit in a comment below it could also be a play on the American idiom cleaned one's clock meaning "to trounce one’s opponents". ...


63

Yes, at least three Most prominent is, of course, Muggleborn (or "Muggle-born" when used as an adjective). Ron draws an explicit distinction between the two terms in Chamber of Secrets1: "Mudblood's a really foul name for someone who is Muggle-born — you know, non-magic parents. There are some wizards — like Malfoy's family — who think they’re better ...


57

Negligible senescence largely fits the bill. Negligible senescence is a term coined by biogerontologist Caleb Finch to denote organisms that do not exhibit evidence of senescence (biological aging), such as measurable reductions in their reproductive capability, measurable functional decline, or rising death rates with age. Biological immortality is the ...


56

Spock didn't mispronounce the word, he was playing a practical joke on Bones. In this instance Memory Alpha seems to be in (slight) error. In the official novelisation, it's made clear that Spock was very well aware that the file had been tampered with (by Bones) and chose to play along, intentionally mispronouncing the word for his own amusement: "...


47

Iron Man (in the MCU, at least) is just a genetically normal person with lots of money and technology. Sure, he had an arc reactor in his chest for a while, but he's no mutant. A mutant as seen in the X-Men would be born genetically different from a normal human. As noted in the above answer, Captain America was a normal person before being subjected to the ...


39

Wikipedia describes Cyberpunk as: a subgenre of science fiction in a dystopian futuristic setting that tends to focus on a "combination of low-life and high tech"1 featuring advanced technological and scientific achievements, such as artificial intelligence and cybernetics, juxtaposed with a degree of breakdown or radical change in the social ...


38

"The 411" is a reference to requesting (or in this case giving) information. It's listed in Maciej Widawski's African American Slang as "Information or fact" A "late night drop box" was used by Blockbuster Videos to allow customers to drop off their videos when the store was closed. Fury is referencing the fact that she likely just blew a hole in the ...


36

First of all, it can fit a theoretical definition: From B5 Wikia: The actual day to day business of running the republic is mostly handled by the Centaurum, which officially acts in an advisory capacity to the Emperor and the Royal Court and in theory has no power of law and can only override the Emperor with a three quarter majority vote by its members ...


36

Within Marvel, the term of "mutants" specifically refers to recipients of the "X-gene", homo superior. It is a specific genetic mutation with a wide variety of effects, occasionally indicated to be the "next stage" of human development. As Phyneas indicated, it's not just the X-men — the Morlocks, the Brotherhood of Mutants, and other X-gene carriers are ...


36

"ageless" would work as it means: something (or someone) that does not look or appear to grow older Elrond's face is described as ageless (lotr, many meetings)


27

In DS9: The Search (Part 2), the fake Admiral Alynna Nechayev refers to the groupings in the Alpha Quadrant as "Alliances": NECHAYEV: They're already meeting with representatives from the Federation Council and a dozen other Alpha Quadrant alliances. We're hoping to have a treaty signed within a matter of days, and we have you to thank for it. ...


27

The word dungeon derives from the French donjon for a central tower (or keep) in a castle, and the latter word is still used in this sense in English. It is possibly derived from the Latin dominus "lord, master". Dungeon later came to be (mis)used as the name for a cell or oubliette, often situated in the lower floor or basement of a keep. I ...


26

I believe that it didn't originate in a work of fantasy, but rather in religion. Concretely, in Christianity, Satan was called the Prince of Darkness. This appears in Paradise Lost, by John Milton, and is thought to derive from the Latin term princeps tenebrarum. This latter term, however, is sufficiently ambiguous, despite being the origin of the modern ...


23

There are two separate questions here, concerning the origin of the concept and the term. The earliest science-fiction story about a space station is Edward Everett Hale's 1869 "The Brick Moon" with its 1870 sequel "Life in the Brick Moon" (a combined edition from 1872 is available as a Project Gutenberg etext), but that doesn't answer ...


23

TL;DR: Cyberpunk is often described as "high tech and low life" - a dystopic world, in which hyper-capitalism (or the corporate state) has created a tiny upper class and a massive, disenfranchised lower class. This lower class is inhabited by sleazy characters who have limited access to the technological advances that have benefited the upper ...


23

Undying is a term that refers specifically to a state of never being in a process of dying (such as Tolkien's Undying Lands), and applies mainly to life, rather than ideas, art, or appearance. It does not necessarily mean being immune to being killed or destroyed, but rather to not being subject to life's usual condition of growing progressively closer to ...


23

The term downwell appears to have first appeared in references to things going on inside actual underground wells. This Google N-grams search shows the term coming into use in the late 1950s, and if you follow up the early Google Books links, most of the uses involve "downwell" conditions in oil wells. Similarly, the Oxford English Dictionary defines the ...


19

As far as the information from the HP books (and movies), Fantastic Beasts first movie, and as you mentioned in your question, the non-wizarding world people are addressed as: MUGGLES by the British community NO-MAJ (NON-MAGICALS) by the American community However, according to David Yates (director of the new Fantastic Beasts movie), in his interview here,...


18

Marshmallows are a human food and not one that you eat often, likewise it's not everyday that you go camping (especially when you are own planet consists mostly of deserts and mountain ranges). It's quite likely that Spock has never gone camping before and so it's only natural that he would do some background research on the customs and traditions associated ...


17

You are mistaken in your assumption about empires and republics being mutually exclusive categories. For example, Octavius (Augustus Caesar) was Emperor of the Roman Republic. While you might want to know how the emperor fits in within Centauri governance and society, the basic premise of your question is false. Responding to peyre's excellent comment: From ...


17

Out of universe: julesrbf: Where did you come up with the word "muggle"? JK Rowling replies -> I was looking for a word that suggested both foolishness and loveability. The word 'mug' came to mind, for somebody gullible, and then I softened it. I think 'muggle' sounds quite cuddly. I didn't know that the word 'muggle' had been used as drug slang at that ...


17

Any word that describes one group defined by some lack of ability relative to another group has the potential to be considered pejorative. When that happens, people create a euphemism designed not to be pejorative, which works until people start noticing that the group described still lacks that ability that others have. Then the process repeats itself, in ...


16

The first use of the word "unobtainium" that I find is in the 1930 work "Dechema-Monographien - Volume 39 - Page 12" Reference ...Gewicht gleich Null. Ein Amerikaner hat diesen Werkstoff scherzhafterweise einmal das Element "Unobtainium" genannt. Google Translation ...Weight equal to zero. An American has jokingly called this material once the ...


16

Short Answer A Sublight Engine or Sublight Drive is the engine used to propel a starship through space at speeds below the speed of light, hence the term. Slightly longer answer The name is, as you suggest in your question, used to differentiate between the engine(s) used for Faster than Light (FTL) travels and the ones used for, so to speak, standard speed ...


16

Turning to roleplaying games, GURPS uses "Unkillable" for "immune to death by violence" and "Unaging" for "never growing older once mature".


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