300

It's helpful to consider in context of the time. Rationings were in effect in WWII England, and Turkish Delights were a particular delicacy that was popular at the time and hard to come by. Also consider that food in general was less sugar packed than many of the options we have today, so many foods at the time that we might consider "disappointing" would ...


177

Yes. There are a few quotes by C.S. Lewis relating to Aslan and Jesus. In a letter to a young girl named Sophia, Lewis writes, "I don't say. 'Let us represent Christ as Aslan.' I say, 'Supposing there was a world like Narnia, and supposing, like ours, it needed redemption, let us imagine what sort of Incarnation and Passion and Resurrection Christ would ...


133

According to a letter to a young fan, Lewis made the decision to keep her out of Heaven because he felt the alternative would be too complicated a story for him to write. He then asked the girl to consider concluding the story herself. I could not write that story myself. Not that I have no hope of Susan ever getting into Aslan's country, but because I ...


77

What (either in or out of universe) was the motive for giving Susan such a hard lot without even explaining what led to it? Lewis wanted to show that one could fall from grace. It had to be a character that we cared about. Let's look at the lead characters from the series: Peter - the natural leader of the group. It would have felt out of character for ...


64

An Amazon reviewer has looked into this and reported their findings: After at least 40 minutes of Googling, I finally found out what the difference between the "adult" version and the regular version is. Apparently the "adult" version includes some essay material about the literature and each book contains a synopsis of information you'd need to know from ...


60

We're only seeing part of the story. There's a lot going on under the surface of the story that we know which never gets directly discussed - things like exactly who Aslan is, or the Emperor from Beyond the Sea. Then, of course, there's the Deep Magic which requires Aslan's sacrifice. So, while it's never spelled out in exact detail, it's likely there is ...


57

At the very beginning of Narnia (in The Magician's Nephew), King Frank and Queen Helen (the cabby and his wife) were set to be the first King and Queen in Narnia. It also appears that some of their descendants were the first kings and queens in Archenland: ... you and your children and grandchildren shall be blessed, and some will be Kings of Narnia, and ...


53

Yes, but not exclusively There's a similar question over on Literature.SE asking "Was C. S. Lewis condemning nuclear weapons in The Magician's Nephew?" that likely has the answer you're looking for. These are different sites, both questions are relevant to their own sites, and the question itself is technically different ("referring" vs "condemning"). ...


47

To add on to what NKCampbell said, consider this from CS Lewis' Mere Christianity (emphasis mine) An ordinary simple Christian kneels down to say his prayers. He is trying to get into touch with God. But if he is a Christian he knows that what is prompting him to pray is also God: God, so to speak, inside him. But he also knows that all his real knowledge ...


45

Each world (Narnia, Charn, our own world, and so on) has an associated "realm beyond", where people go when they die. Narnia's version is called Aslan's country, the version associated to our own world is called Heaven, and so on. For each world, this appears very much like a better and more wonderful version of the land of the living. They call Aslan's ...


45

If you're going to do a job, might as well do it properly. Yes, killing Edmund would prevent all four from becoming kings and queens as prophesied. But the remaining three would still be able to be crowned, thus fulfilling the prophecy as nearly as possible at that point. Perhaps they would even have found a fourth person, not their brother, to fulfill the ...


43

This man is Digory Kirke, and while I don't believe it's been specified in the movie universe, in the original novels Digory is one of two protagonists in the first Narnia novel (chronologically), The Magician's Nephew. As a child he and Polly end up in Narnia, and are two of the first, if not the first humans to do so. They witness Aslan creating the land....


43

In context, I believe the river is death. As you correctly note, Aslan is Jesus, not an allegory for Jesus or another member of the Godhead, he's just Jesus. And unfortunately for humanity, there is no ocean that can be crossed to enter heaven; we have to die. In our universe, Jesus's forgiveness is the bridge that allows us to cross that barrier ...


38

There isn't a great deal of in-text evidence - other than Susan having grown too worldly and her fascination with lipstick, nylons and invitations having replaced her faith in Narnia. The explanation, considering the author is probably most simply that Lewis had a dim and uncharitable view of women. Girls were fine - see Lucy and Polly as innocent, ...


36

@TillB is correct, the wardrobe only worked when you didn't expect to anything to be there. It was the same in both the book and the movie. Here's an excerpt from the book, right at the very end. The bolding is mine, to emphasize what's relevant to the question, but the italics are in the book itself. And that would have been the very end of the story ...


35

In The Magician's Nephew, Uncle Digory's Uncle (The Magician) creates magic rings which he gives to his nephew (Digory Kirke) and his nephew's friend (Polly Plummer). These two visit a land which is like an 'in-between' land which is a forest with many pools, through which one can visit many different lands. Wikipedia describes it well: Digory finds ...


35

As pointed out in the comments to this question, there can't be a definitive answer because genres are a fluid thing. I wasn't aware that some commentators regard the idea of a link between the real world and the magical one as archetypal of high fantasy, and I'm not sure why,as for me at least, the distinction between high and low is about the dichotomy ...


32

They aren't the only humans. And they aren't even the first humans to visit Narnia. The book The Magician's Nephew chronicles the first visitors to the land after Aslan creates Narnia. Others came to the land by other means. The Telmarines, for example, came through a cave after being shipwrecked on an island in our world. And yet others came via other ...


30

Yes. I don't know what editions you have where each of the seven books includes a different map, but in the beautiful editions I first read as a child, the following map was printed inside the front cover of several (probably all) of the books. It was drawn by Pauline Baynes, the official illustrator of the Narnia series, and shows Narnia and the ...


29

Appears to be "Yes" I haven't found a primary source for this, but numerous secondary sources claim that Lewis once wrote: '[Aslan] is an invention giving an imaginary answer to the question, "What might Christ become like if there really were a world like Narnia, and He chose to be incarnate and die and rise again in that world as He actually has done ...


28

In this Timeline which is generally believed to be accurate as some if not all are based on actual notes by CS Lewis. We see its been almost 1300 years since the Lion, the Witch, and The Wardrobe.


28

Just speaking the word isn't enough: there are ceremonies involved as well: "That was the secret of secrets," said the Queen Jadis. "It had long been known to the great kings of our race that there was a word which, if spoken with the proper ceremonies, would destroy all living things except the one who spoke it. But the ancient kings were weak and soft-...


27

C.S. Lewis stated unequivocally in a letter to a fan that the books can be read in any order but that his personal preference was that they should be read in the chronological order in which they were written. "I think I agree with your order {i.e. chronological} for reading the books more than with your mother's. The series was not planned beforehand as ...


27

Left Hand Side: Jewel the Unicorn - The Last Battle Yellow and Green Rings - The Magician's Nephew Trufflehunter the Badger - Prince Caspian The Magician's Book - The Voyage of the Dawn Treader Cair Paravel - The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe (First Appearance) Lucy's Cordial - The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe The Dawn Treader - The Voyage of the ...


27

It's important to note that in each incident, there was at least one person involved who did not expect to travel to Narnia: Lucy hides in the wardrobe and is unexpectedly transported to Narnia Lucy enters the wardrobe, expecting to go to Narnia. Nobody else believes her at this point, so Edmund follows her to have a laugh at her expense, but finds himself ...


26

It should be remembered that until Edmund asked for Turkish delight, Jadis had very likely never heard of it at all, and so the enchantments she used to create it were running on his ideas about it. It was already Edmund's favorite candy (or he would have asked for whatever his favorite candy was and we would be talking about that), and he could have been ...


25

As far as the name "Aslan" is concerned, Lewis explained this directly in response to a letter asking this very question: Dear Miss Jenkins, It is a pleasure to answer your question. I found the name in the notes to Lane's Arabian Nights: it is Turkish for Lion. I pronounce it as Ass-lan myself. And of course I meant the Lion of Judah. I am so glad ...


22

It seems as though non-talking animals have no souls or afterlife. From The Last Battle, Chapter 14, "Night Falls on Narnia" (emphasis mine): The creatures came rushing on, their eyes brighter and brighter as they drew nearer and nearer to the standing Stars. But as they came right up to Aslan one or other of two things happened to each of them. They all ...


21

No, not more than other weapons If you read (and preferably reread, a few times) what Lewis says via Aslan, the emphasis isn't on the deplorable word itself. The emphasis is on people's beliefs and attitudes. Charn and Jadis are used as a warning of what can happen when a ruler thinks primarily in terms of themselves, rather than in terms of their ...


20

I emailed Douglas Gresham two days ago and asked him which pronunciation was correct. I've heard two pronunciations of "Calormen/Calormene": "CA-lor-men/CA-lor-meen" (the one I grew up using/hearing) and "cuh-LOR-men" for both (the one Focus on the Family Radio Theatre uses). Could you let me know which pronunciation Jack Lewis intended and used? He ...


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