17

In Chapter 17 of 'Foundation's Edge', one of the Gaians ("Dom") tells a fable to Trevize and Pelorat. Here's an abridged version: We have a tale about that — a fable, perhaps. I cannot vouch for its authenticity. In fact, on the face of it, it sounds like fiction. [...] I was about to tell our guests the story of Eternity. [...] the fable states that ...


13

I don't think the exact layout of the Section offices adjoining the time shafts is described. However it's clear that when they leave the kettles they enter some form of office that is still outside Time. To get into Time they have to pass through a curtain. For example in chapter 1 there is the description: He paused again at the infinitely thin curtain of ...


11

The idea of changes to the past propagating forward necessarily involves a second time dimension -- there's no avoiding it. To be perceived, "change" necessarily involves a time dimension against which the change occurs. When what is changing is events in time, then you need a second time dimension for it to change in. You can't observably change the past ...


9

Nemesis can't be made to fit without significant contradictions with the rest of the Robot/Foundation universe. There's no reason The End of Eternity couldn't fit in with the Foundation universe (or many other fictional universes!), given the events of that novel. The themes of the Robot/Foundation universe towards the end really tie in well to the themes ...


6

But then later it explains how each section was duplicated for each century and implies that each section is actually in it's century. That's not quite correct. The sections are in two parts with half contiguous with the kettle shaft and half present in the target time period. The two parts are separated by a portal. Asimov doesn't describe the portal in ...


6

It seems to me that [...] there is another time Yes, in-universe the Eternals called this physiotime. It seems to me that Asimov would want to set his novel in a four-dimensional universe Physiotime really doesn't seem to be a fifth dimension; it is more complicated than that. (This is actually rather reminiscent of what we would now call a ...


5

The basic plot of the novella Palimpsest by Charles Stross, published in 2009, is quite similar: Welcome to the Stasis, the clandestine, near-omnipotent organization that stands at the heart of Charles Stross’s Hugo Award-winning novella, Palimpsest.     By mastering the mysteries of the Timegate, the Stasis has repeatedly steered ...


4

The Wikipedia article on Nemesis has this to say: In the foreword of the novel, Asimov stated that Nemesis is not a part of the millieu that consists of the Foundation, Robot, or Empire series. He also stated that he may change his mind on the matter as nothing in the story appears to rule out or contradict any of the later stories. Some have suspected ...


1

My guess about 'Nemesis' was that it's a half-remembered Settler myth that conveniently removes all robots and spacers from the mix and is a myth for the invention of the hyperdrive. Note that there is no evidence for this conclusion aside from the fact that the events in Nemesis totally contradict events in the Robot Series - but only in such a way as to ...


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