58

In the books, there's a different reaction than just "fascination", but the reason is the same: Martians are not used to seeing all the way to the horizon with their own eyes (ie. not through the glass of a dome or their suit's helmet), and Earth's horizon is (as you say) further away. From Caliban's War, when Bobbie Draper is on Earth: A bored guard ...


45

In The Expanse, the efficient Epstein spaceship drives, combined with steroid cocktails (the "juice") that make humans withstand such maneuvers, are capable of doing high-g maneuvers to evade incoming fire and point defense. Rail guns fire large slugs at high velocity, but they only shoot in a straight line, and are trivial to evade at long range. Therefore,...


45

For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. —Newton. By kicking Naomi away, Holden propels himself down, so his activated magnetic boots can make contact with the floor. Once he's safe, he can reel her back in. Had Holden been in the right position, he could've done it in reverse, pushing Naomi down, but he didn't know if she ...


44

Having not seen the TV show, I can only relay what was in the show's source novel; Leviathan Wakes Overpopulation If you asked OPA recruiters when they were drunk and feeling expansive, they might say there were a hundred million in the Belt. Ask an inner planet census taker, it was nearer to fifty million. Any way you looked, the population was ...


42

These are described in Leviathan Wakes as "focus drugs". They apparently give the user the ability to accurately assess the mental state of those that they're observing through their micro-expressions. Lopez reached into his pocket, took out a small packet of white lozenges, and popped one into his mouth. He didn’t offer one to Holden. Lopez’s ...


30

Probably around 2350. The timeframe for the series is, presumably intentionally, left vague. The world of The Expanse started as a tabletop RPG run by Ty Franck (one of the authors writing the book series behind the pseudonym James S. A. Corey). This RPG was called "2350", and was presumably set in that year. (An anonymous Wikia user claiming to be Ty ...


29

This isn't explained in the TV show, and I don't know of any explanations from other movies/series that apply here (although they might exist), so I'll attempt an answer based on the book series that the show is based on. That might allay suspicions that this was solely done as a "TV thing", at least. Your question is really twofold: Why are the visors not ...


25

First of all, the boarding operations might seem pointless when the Donnager will probably self-destruct anyway, but as Holden muses in Chapter 15: Boarding a ship was one of the riskiest maneuvers in naval combat. It was basically a race between the boarders rushing to the engine room and the collective will of those who had their fingers on the self-...


20

As far as I remember, they never gave out that level of detail on the TV show. We're just told that Ceres has much lower gravity than Earth. In the novels that the show is based on, the gravity is artificially generated "spin" gravity, which does match the visual on the show: "down" is actually pointing out into space. Note, for example, that the airlocks (...


17

The source novel series indicates that advanced anti-radiation "Meds" are a reality. Dosages of radiation that would normally kill a human somehow become a chronic condition (one that requires careful administration of these drugs on an ongoing basis) rather than a fatal one. “I’ve never actually seen the detector activate,” Miller said, his voice rough ...


15

Within the books, anti-personnel lasers exist in the Expanse universe and are sufficiently common that there are standard defences against them, notably gas grenades that fill the air with "anti-laser smoke" and "ablative" armour. Anti-ship lasers are far less common and are basically a known technology but one that is used infrequently ...


15

Mars is a society fueled by the dream of one day, centuries from now, having a terraformed Mars that is as habitable as Earth. With the opening of the rings, suddenly there are dozens of worlds that are already habitable. No one is willing to invest in the terraforming of Mars anymore, and so Mars is undergoing a social and economic collapse as people give ...


13

So, considering the fast but inefficient engines of The Expanse The entire point of the engines in The Expanse, called "Epstein drives", is that they're not "fast and inefficient". They are in fact extremely efficient. And, of course, completely fictional and indistinguishable from magic – most of the physics in the show and book series is realistic, but ...


13

According to the source novel it was done (largely) as a tax dodge. Having multiple parents means that each parent can claim a tax break to support their child. Eight parents means eight allowances but with only one additional mouth to feed. “So many parents for only one child,” Lopez said, slowly unwrapping another lozenge. The Martians had lots of ...


13

It was invented (for the TV) by linguist Nick Farmer He used Haitian creole as his guide, because its speakers all came from elsewhere to work on the island. Slaves taken from Africa combined their own native languages with the dominant French, and the result was a shared tongue that only the slaves understood. Like Haiti, the Belt is dominated by a wealthy ...


12

Because drones don't make for compelling characters. The authors actually addressed exactly this in another interview (well, a reddit AMA) today: Q: To the extent that your books about the future reflect the times we're living in now, they are provocative and fascinating and an awesome read. What sorts of things that happen in the expanse do you really ...


12

Per the wikipedia page on artificial pancreases The artificial pancreas is a technology in development to help people with diabetes automatically control their blood glucose level by providing the substitute endocrine functionality of a healthy pancreas. There are several important exocrine (digestive) and endocrine (hormonal) functions of ...


12

The slow zone's properties are described fairly well in the book: But the most intriguing factor of the slow zone, and the one that gives it its name, is the absolute speed limit of six hundred meters per second. Any object above the quantum level traveling faster than that is locked down by what seems to be an inertial dampening field, and then dragged ...


11

The first season covers about the first half of Leviathan Wakes. There are definitely events in the first book that have not yet happened on the show. However, there are also components of the show that did not occur in the first book. For example:


11

In the book, Dresden explains that “We modified our science team to remove ethical restraints.” Half a dozen clues clicked into place in Holden’s head. “Sociopaths,” he said. “You turned them into sociopaths.” “High-functioning sociopaths,” Dresden said with a nod. He seemed pleased to explain it. “And extremely curious ones. As long as we ...


11

As long as you don't need it fast, it's much cheaper to ship water (or any other bulk material that's available) from the asteroid belt to Earth orbit than from the surface of the Earth. Just to get to LEO (200km) from Earth's surface is a minimum of 9.4km/s of delta-v, more if you're in a higher (more stable) orbit. LEO to Ceres averages around 9.5km/s of ...


10

Because it's the way James S.A. Corey wanted it. The Expanse isn't hard science fiction where everything has to be scientifically explained, understood or even be based on real physics. OrbitBooks OB - Leviathan Wakes (the first book in The Expanse series) has a gritty and realistic feel. How much research did you do on the technology side of things, and ...


10

It's described in the book as a set of free-floating instructions designed to adapt to and guide other replicating systems So, it's kind of like a virus or even more like a computer virus. That makes it substrate-independent. In other words, just information.


10

Acceleration causes significant force on the human body. This force is actually not something we can survive for long, although we've also not really had the chance to test the human body's reaction to long-term acceleration like that. Humans black out around 4-6 g if that acceleration has been acting for only a few seconds and the person is not in some ...


10

It's covered in book 3, Abaddons Gate. The rail gun is mentioned early on, as something they were easily able to afford having gone freelance and picked up lucrative contracts. It's justified as ammo is easier to obtain than torpedoes when they don't have a government sponsor. In the months since he'd put up his shingle as a freelance courier and escort ...


9

I'm not too sure how high the water has risen in the show, although your estimate looks reasonable. There are some additional shots from the tenth episode in season 2, "Cascade", that give you a look at the ocean and the city, but I couldn't draw any conclusions from it. Take a look yourself. In the books, we also don't know too much, but we have this ...


9

From the source novel, Leviathan Wakes, we learn that people live inside Eros. The spin does indeed threaten to spin them off into space, but the floor (really the exterior walls) prevent this from happening. Eros supported a population of one and a half million, a little more than Ceres had in visitors at any given time. Roughly the shape of a potato,...


9

We don't know. I've searched through all the books starting with Abaddon's Gate (which is when the humans first travel to the Ring) and none of them depict an event in which a ship or probe is sent through the "back" of the Ring. The books describe the Ring as an artificially sustained Einstein-Rosen bridge. You go through the Ring, you don’t come out ...


9

The mohawks, beards and the overall fancy and unusual look (from an Earther point of view) of the Belters are just part of their culture. Consider that: Earthers and Martians ships are mostly military, so you have stricter dress codes; Belters, on the contrary, are not just astronauts or "space travelers", they actually live in space, being it a ship or ...


8

Yes. Like you said yourself, the outer planets themselves are not habitable, but several of their moons have humans living on them. Ganymede, Titan and Europa all have human settlements. Io and Titania possibly also have humans living on it who don't primarily work there, but perhaps not (depends on what you're actually after with your question; Titania ...


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