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3

The Witch-king was scared of Frodo and had almost been killed The Witch-king expected the mission to be a lot easier than it ended up being. He was still shaken from the fight with Gandalf, and then Frodo tried stabbing him with a sword that was specifically enchanted to kill him. (The same type of sword that Merry eventually successfully used to kill him.) ...


1

Sauron was behind the attack, and it was directed by the Nazgûl In Tolkien's The Hunt for the Rings manuscripts, he says that this attack was orchestrated by Sauron, with one or more of the Nazgûl present on scene to direct it. Sauron had already interrogated Gollum, but the goal here was to make sure no one else did the same. Sauron discovered that Gandalf ...


1

The Witch-king was there for a few days and left the day before the Hobbits arrived. The Witch-king was there until the 27th. [four of the Riders] pursue Rangers along Greenway, and having slain them or driven them off Eastwards, make a camp at Andrath (where the road passes between the Barrowdowns and the South Downs). [The Witch-king] now visits the ...


11

Because it's intentionally ambiguous in the film Galadriel only says "he", not "Boromir". Does Boromir want it? Sure, we've seen that when the Ring "falls" into the snow in the Misty Mountains. How about Aragorn though? The reason the scene with Frodo and Aragorn at the Breaking of the Fellowship is so powerful is because up to ...


8

Frodo tries to see the best in people; when Boromir then acts on it, Frodo again allows him a final dignity of silence.


20

Because the Ring didn’t want him to In both the movies and the books it is clear that the Ring is semi-sentient and has “wants”: the primary one being that it wants to return to Sauron. Or, perhaps more accurately, it responds to Sauron’s desire to regain it. More speculatively, it “wants” to be wielded by someone with the power to do so. Boromir was more ...


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