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In The Flash (v1) #146 (1964), the story "The Mirror Master's Master Stroke" (auth: John Broome, art: Carmine Infantino and Joe Giella) has the titular villain switch legs with the Flash (yes, switch legs) and our hero is forced to run on his hands instead so that he can defeat him. Not quite the same as having an injury to his legs, but close enough, if you ...


69

I covered part of this in my answer regarding "How does the Flash perceive time?" In the treatment I discuss that the nature of the Flash's powers are based around his ability to perceive, analyze and counter the attacks of his enemies. Despite their silly names and often less than stellar outfits, the Flash's Rogues Gallery are not to be taken lightly, ...


61

The Short Answer: It is likely the Flash (and other speedsters like him) have complete control of the temporal aspects of their speed powers because it would otherwise be intolerable to be faster than everything around you and having no control of how you were able to perceive it. Such a perceptual state would leave the world, from his point of view, a ...


59

In terms of pure speed, in their respective universes, the Flash (Barry Allen) is faster, by far, than Quicksilver. When Marvel and DC have had crossovers between Universes, Quicksilver's powers remained constant due to their mutant origins (which presupposes his body has been organically adapted for the use of superhuman speed) while the Flash's speed is ...


55

If they are holding to canon, the people the Flash rescues are not affected by his speed. He technically stops running (or slows down if they are in motion). Grabs them and accelerates again. They are then protected from his powers by his speed force aura. The Flash's body is surrounded by what he calls his "speed force aura". This aura protects him and ...


51

Yes, in Flash (vol. 1) #190, published Aug. 1969, the Flash suffers a broken leg: Within the story Barry Allen goes to a rather elaborate, Silver Agey ruse to prevent people from learning that he is temporarily incapacitated, involving a spare Flash costume that he sews shut, fills with "energized gas" and controls with transistors that -- oh, never mind. ...


50

I'm not sure if he's ever been depicted as doing so in the current series. [EDIT: Yes he has, thanks to Gallifreyan] However, he was shown doing so in Ep1 of the 1990 series. Regardless of whether he has been shown as doing so or not, it is extremely likely that he can based on real world physics and examples. The Basicliscus Lizard can run on water ......


42

Superman is highly aware that most of his opponents are often less durable and usually less physically powerful than he is. When in doubt he uses the least amount of force required to handle his opponents. To understand his actions, they have to be seen in context. The fight opens with Superman using his super-senses to detect that Batman's utility belt is ...


39

It's already been established that all of the Flashes can move past light-speed via the Speed Force. As for Superman, he's never shown to move at light-speed while running inside a planetary atmosphere. This image should answer your question, though. This scan was taken from Flash v2, #220. Flash states that Superman is moving at over 2000 miles/sec, ...


28

According to Comicvine, this is Justice League of America #154 from May 1978, subtitled "I'll Kill You In Your Dreams!". You can read it here. In the story, Doctor Destiny sent the Justice League dreams with a warning about how they will be taken down, and sent their respective enemies instructions (in dreams) on how to take the heroes down. The ...


27

Yes, the Flash can run on water, much like the common basilisk. I can't speak for the comics, but in the TV series it first happened in S1E5:


23

There was also a silver age Justice League story where the villain (Brain Storm, a personal favorite) gave physical handicaps to the heroes - Superman was blinded, Green Arrow lost his arms, and the Flash's legs were merged into a single leg. They of course learned how to triumph over their disabilities and defeat the foe. The Flash did it by super-speed-...


22

The Flash's powers have evolved since the character's first appearance in 1940. While they were supposedly scientifically-based, little effort was made to explain any Flash's powers until the late sixties or early seventies re-creation of Barry Allen as the Silver Age Flash. Jay Garrick who was once called the Golden Age or Earth-2 Flash, gained his powers ...


22

Barry Allen, in The Flash, doesn't have a healing factor in the sense that the term is typically used in comics. He is not able to heal wounds or injuries that normal humans could not. What he has is accelerated healing -- because everything about his biology is accelerated, he heals the same way that a non-metahuman would but it happens more quickly. For ...


21

Depends on the universe. In DC, Flash can beat the speed of light while Quicksilver tops out at Mach 4. However, in the crossover events, we've learned that Flash cannot access the speed force in the Marvel universe and cannot go faster than Mach 1 while Quicksilver has the same speed in either universe. Source


21

In the comics, Barry Allen has been shown to run faster than light, as per @Keen's answer to this related question. Exactly how fast has never really been measured -- as far as I know, they've never tried to apply the Star Trek "warp" scale to Barry. In the DC universe, there are five "speed barriers" (really, critical velocities): the sound barrier, the ...


20

Despite how silly it might seem, unless otherwise specified, speedsters run like everyone else. But all speedsters are not created equally so each speedster, depending on the mechanics of their super-speed, might leave a different footprint or spread of footprints depending on how their powers function and how how they are based in their comic physics. This ...


20

What each suit was composed of depends on which era of the Flash you are talking about. Each one had a different suit and different properties. BUT, and this is the most important part: None of his/their suits had any particular property that protected them from destruction. The protection came from the Flash's speed-force generated aura. The Flash's body ...


20

Flash has never been demonstrated as being able to breathe in space, or to hold his breath for superhuman lengths of time. His 'powers and abilities' section on Wikipedia doesn't mention anything about it, though it does mention that he has the ability to generate a field around himself that protects him and his clothes from air friction. Most likely, this ...


18

No. The Flash is not using a supernatural ability to see the future. This is not a new power at all. It is a new and different way of depicting how the Flash controls his perception of time, space and his relationship to the world at large. Being as fast as he is, he appears to violate causality appearing to be everywhere at once. He isn't but his speed can ...


18

In comics, all speed is relative. So you have to be more specific when you say "faster than" when you refer to comic heroes. Is Green Lantern faster than the Flash when it comes to crossing great intergalactic distances? Yes. He can generate wormholes to cross vast distances instantly and because the Flash can't run in space... On a planet? No one is faster ...


16

I'm not clear on what the limits of Superman's speed are, but with The Flash, at least, there doesn't seem to be any limit to how fast he can run if needed. He has absolutely been shown to run faster than light speed, and uses that ability to time travel on occasion. However fast The Green Lantern's ring allows him to go, The Flash can go faster. The key ...


16

In most incarnations of the character, Barry Allen, is a forensic scientist. He uses a computer for the same reason most forensic scientists would. To collect and organize data for the later use of other forensic scientists or police officers, as needed. In Flash #1 (2011) we see Barry using a number of computers and tablets to reference a variety of ...


15

Most of the Flashes get their powers by channeling an extra-dimensional energy known as "The Speed Force." In fact, most DC characters with speedster-type powers are said to ultimately draw their quickness from this ultimate energy source. As a result, the Flash in particular can use the the Speed Force to do more than just move quickly. Wally West once ...


15

Strictly from the TV show up to the point of Legends of Today, Caitlin Snow mentions his top speed quite accurately: What's the fastest Barry's run? Little over Mach two, when he ran back in time. Taking Googles conversion that's just over 2469.6km/h or 1534.54mp/h Mach 2 = 2469.6km/h and Mach 2.5 = 3087km/h. I'd say this is our top speed range, I'd ...


14

The wings in and of themselves were nothing but ornamentation paying homage to the legendary speedster Hermes/Mercury, fastest of the Greek/Roman Gods. Like many costumes of the era, the alternating colors were designed partially as registration aids and as a visual element helping to enhance the appearance of the character and his special effects. The ...


14

Thaddeus's answer is, by far, the most important one here. Two more things that I wanted to point out, though: The Flash's powers are almost universally deliberate actions. Unlike Superman, who is bulletproof even when he's having a quiet dinner as Clark Kent, the Flash has to BECOME intangible, or CHOOSE to travel through time, etc. It's something ...


13

The short answer is "he very well might lose his power". The longer answer requires understanding how DC structures their comic book stories, so buckle up. The terminology is a bit confusing here, because Marvel and DC don't have "universes", they have "multi-verses". Since you're specifically asking about "in another universe", it's important to make that ...


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