11

Maybe I'm being a little unfair, but I've never regarded Asimov as an author who went in for deep philosophical insights. Many (most?) of his books are thinly disguised whodunnits. Before I get too many downvotes I should emphasise that I, like many of us, started out reading Asimov's short stories and I love almost all of what Asimov has written. Arguably ...


7

The idea for middle section of "The Gods Themselves" came first. Asimov had several reasons for writing it. There had been complaints that he did not write about aliens or 'sex scenes'. He then had a conversation with Robert Silverberg about the fictional element plutonium-186. So Asimov thought up a parallel universe with different fundimental laws, and ...


5

As well as Asimov's list of Robots / Empire / Foundation books not including 'The Gods Themselves', there are also two points in the books themselves which demonstrate that 'Gods' is not part of the Robots / Empire / Foundation continuity. Firstly... there are no robots in 'The Gods Themselves'. In the Robots stories as collected in 'I, Robot' and 'The ...


4

So, is there anything in the book that I missed, that suggests the different physics are related to the soft ones' nature? Yes. From Part II, chapter 3b, heavily abridged: Odeen said, "I can't explain it all, you haven't had the background. I will try to make it simple and you just listen. You understand, first, that everything is made up of tiny ...


4

Jenkins' Guide seems to have an opinion opposite to you: he claims the second part is the best of the book, and the rest is fluff.


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