67

Gandalf calculated the time he would need to fulfill the task and come back, and the result was "at the morning in five days from now, I assume to be back". And because he knows, from which direction he will occur, he said it like a wise wizard will do: To appear with the light of sun, from the east, in the morning of the fifth day... sounds better ...


48

There are five classes of rings mentioned: The One Ring, the Three held by the Elves, the Seven held by the Dwarves, the Nine that went to Mortal Men and others "lesser essays in the craft." 'In Eregion long ago many Elven-rings were made, magic rings as you call them, and they were, of course, of various kinds: some more potent and some less. The ...


46

No. Sauron was intent on ruling all of Middle-earth You need only read a little further to find the answer to your question. Sauron promised that Men would be able to rule over their own affairs, however the Captains of the West see past this: Looking into the messenger’s eyes, they read his thought. He was to be that lieutenant, and gather all that ...


31

The Istari (the five wizards) were special cases. We don't know many details, but JRRT did say enough to make it clear that there were differences between them and the other Maiar who visited Middle-earth. Ordinarily, all of the Ainur (Maiar and Valar both) have bodies (or not) at will: Now the Valar took to themselves shape and hue; and because they were ...


16

Doesn't much matter, really... While I concur with Edlothiad's answer in so far as Gandalf knows his Enemy's heart and Aragorn knows the history of Sauron's treachery, there is one eensy little detail that the answer leaves out: All of Mouthpiece of Sauron's speechifying is so much of a house of cards built on a foundation of shifting sand being eaten away ...


12

He meant, on the fifth day from this day, I will arrive at dawn, from the east. Note that this does not imply that the battle of the Hornburg last 5 days. Aragorn, Theoden, Gandalf and the rest of the party had not reached the Hornburg yet. As I recall (I have not have "The Two Towers" on hand) they were still a day's journey from reaching the ...


10

It's hard to know exactly what your teacher is referring to. However, recent editions of LoTR include at the beginning a "Note on the Text" written by Douglas A. Anderson, which talks about the history of the revisions made in different editions, and in particular mentions the changes that happened when it was republished in the US. In 1965, ...


9

There is a clue to the Watcher in the Water's identity in The Silmarillion. In the chapter "Of Beren and Luthien" it is revealed that before the Gate of Angband "Black chasms opened beside the road, whence forms as of writhing serpents issued." This suggests the tentacled monster described in The Fellowship of the Ring was a remnant of ...


9

Per The History of Middle Earth Vol. 11 The Naugrim were ever, as they still remain, short and squat in stature; they were deep-breasted, strong in the arm, and stout in the leg, and their beards were long. Indeed this strangeness they have that no Man nor Elf has ever seen a beardless Dwarf - unless he were shaven in mockery, and would then be more like to ...


9

The question is moot, and not just because his power was about to be destroyed. Sauron didn’t just expand his rule by war, he was also a corrupter. Even if he had refrained from war, that would only have been because he was working to bring them under his sway via corruption. He was incapable of deciding enough is enough, and so would not have kept to what ...


5

Tolkien said that Bombadil represented a sort of passive pacifism, which was important to represent in the story but couldn't play much of a role in the actual plot. From Tolkien's Letters, letter #144: Tom Bombadil is not an important person – to the narrative. I suppose he has some importance as a 'comment'. I mean, I do not really write like that: he is ...


3

I think that depends on how the question is meant. There certainly were not Elves just wandering around Mordor in the late Third Age. There are not all that many Elves left by this point, and they are mostly limited to a few areas. It is worth noting that he actually says "one of those bloody-handed Elves, or one of the filthy tarks" - tark means a ...


2

i agree, it seems pretty likely the watcher is one of the nameless things just like ungoliant, whom had scary grabbing arms as well (ungoliant is just as scary as the watcher, but we just don't know anything about him)


1

It depends who you ask and what exactly defines being the "best fighter". The Ranger's effective service - and indeed their survival in the years of Sauron's advance - depends on their true nature and capabilities remaining hidden. Most people either do not know about them or (like the Bree-landers) view them as untrustworthy vagrants, not heroic ...


1

If Gandalf, like the Balrog also a Maia (but much wiser and knowledgeable about these things), took so many years to work out that this was the One Ring despite being in its presence quite often (all the way back from the Lonely Mountain and actually knowing that Bilbo and then Frodo had a magic ring for decades afterwards), then the Balrog wouldn't have ...


1

I wouldn't read it literally. He means "I won't quit the fight until the final battle is over (even if it looks like we're losing)". Tolkien's wording is more poetic than this one.


1

Remember that Morgoth only realised he was diminished after he met with the Valar again. Keep in mind that Morgoth had Sauron in his fortress, and Gothmog too, but he never noticed his diminished strength around them. Plus Morgoth corrupted men to be like him, and we see they clearly have his traits. What does this mean? Well, the Valar are suddenly standing ...


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