80

No, the point is that Kirk, despite having an interest in 20th Century history, is still largely ignorant of the finer details. He's dredging up half-forgotten memories in what the original script describes as an "inspiration" moment. KIRK: He's harmless. (inspiration) Back in the sixties he was part of the Free Speech movement at Berkeley. I ...


55

This is addressed in the film's official novelisation which contains a slightly extended version of Kirk's conversations aboard the Bounty. Mr Scott was making plans to turn the hold into a holding tank, per the Captain's orders, and evidently worked out that he'd need materials from at least the twentieth century (onwards). "Scott here, admiral. Wi' ...


53

According to this website, whales need water to: Support their weight and prevent their own organs from collapsing in on themselves. regulate body temperature / prevent overheating. remain hydrated. Movement (as you already pointed out, though not really relevant in a tank the size of a fish-bowl). Food consumption (again, not very relevant here).


45

The film's official novelisation contains a version of events that includes a translation of the probe's conversation with the whales. Apologies for the length of the quote: [Probe] Why did you remain silent for so long? They [The whales] tried to explain, but it reacted in surprise and disbelief. Where were you? it asked. We were not here, ...


37

The dyslexic comment indicates that he was aiming for 'LSD' and arrived at 'LDS'. No Mormons were harmed in the creation of this joke.


34

Inertial dampers aren't that reliable Without water, a zero-gravity environment would still have been dangerous for the whales. In the absence of water, the whales would have needed null gravity within their chamber to keep from collapsing under their own weight. Without water to hold them in place, the whales would then have been vulnerable to buffeting. ...


29

Main Canon There's a throwaway line in the film to explain her decision to time-jump without a second's thought. GILLIAN: What are you talking about? I'm coming with you. KIRK: You can't. Our next stop is the 23rd Century. GILLIAN: What do I care? I've got nobody but those whales... Star Trek: The Voyage Home - Original Screenplay While the clear ...


28

It is highly possible that McCoy was carrying a bit of an augmented kit. His kit would likely have been the one he took with him when abandoning the Enterprise at the Genesis Planet in ST:III. Prior to the Enterprise's destruction, they were told that Spock was alive, but McCoy did not know the extent of Spock's regeneration. When he grabbed his kit while ...


28

It appears that there was a sequel novel Probe that gives some more background about the "Whale Probe". Kirk and his crew later discover that the Probe was created by beings that resembled Earth cetaceans Spock successfully mind melds with the probe, learning that it did not seek to be destructive to other races, instead they were so different ...


27

According to the film's official novelisation, the helicopter belonged to the plastics company, Plexicorp. Sulu evidently stole it after tricking the pilot into showing him how it works (since he obviously didn't want the pilot to get freaked out about having to drop the perspex panels off in the middle of the park, to an invisible ship): Sulu approached ...


23

Although the film doesn't make it immediately obvious, the reality is that Spock and the Enterprise crew have already travelled through time on at least two other occasions using the "Slingshot effect"; once by accident (in TOS : "Tomorrow is Yesterday" when the crew inadvertantly stray into the gravity well of a black star) and once on purpose (in TOS: "...


23

That's a whale, or, rather, a quite stylized depiction of a whale owing to the limited computer graphics technology available at the time the movie was made. I found the answer in a documentary made in 1987 by UK's Open University about Computer Aided Design. It looked at how the dream sequence was made in ST IV and interviewed the people at ILM responsible ...


22

If you'll accept the Vonda McIntyre novelization as a source, it goes into some detail about this. Apparently they have frozen humpback tissue on hand that they could clone. However, 1) it won't help with the immediate problem, because a cloned whale won't know any of the songs the probe is looking for, and 2) humpbacks are big-brained enough that they have ...


22

The humpbacks were not brought back to repopulate the species. The main reason they wanted the whales was to answer the probe that was close to Earth and destroying it. In the movie, a giant probe was moving through space and transmitting a signal which was disabling power to starships as it moved through space. When it reached Earth, the signal had ...


22

They had a narrow timeframe that would be useful to them. They needed to arrive late enough that the whale-tank materials they needed to modify the ship would be readily available -- post-1950s. Not just "possible", but in stock locally. They needed an economy robust and entreprenurial enough that their oddball material purchases needs wouldn't pop up ...


21

We know from the film itself that the tank had sufficient volume to contain 400 tonnes of water as well as two large whales. What's not immediately obvious is that the tank is only half full, at least according to the original film script. 218 EXT. OCEAN - UNDERWATER - ILM ELEMENTS George and Gracie, moving slowly through the deep, begin to BEAM OUT.....


21

We regularly see characters beam up and down while carrying equipment and even organic life forms without getting molecularly fused to them, so the transporter can clearly deal with these situations. Technically, the very scene you're referring to is effectively the proof that this is not a big deal in-universe. We know they wouldn't get fused together ...


17

Star Trek went out of its way to be inclusive when it was not popular to do so. By hiring cast members of many races and cultures they invited their audience to see inclusivity in the everyday running of the show. To go out of their way to create a joke at the expense of a religious group seems to be out of character for the writers and executives. I doubt ...


17

The film's official novelisation makes it clear that Sulu has never flown a helicopter, even in a simulation. Sulu approached the plastics company's big huey, entranced. He had seen still photos and battered old film of this helicopter, but none had survived, even in museums, to his time. The. huey was as extinct as the humpback whale. He stroked one hand ...


16

Once the whales are brought back from the past, they are able to communicate with the probe and send it on its way. Creating this sequence created some behind-the-scene's controversy. Nimoy explains: Morrison’s response had a wonderful, profound effect on my thinking about these issues. (And upon the Star Trek IV script, in which Spock tell McCoy, “There ...


15

Transparent aluminium formula = use of company helicopter Going on the script alone, they pawned Kirk's glasses for $100, but — in a sense — they also pawned Scotty's formula for the transparent aluminium. This probably got them a lot more than $100. First of all, the formula itself — being extremely valuable to the commercial plastics expert who they ...


13

I'm going to go out on a limb with a guarded "yes". McCoy certainly recognised the condition described and was pretty confident that he'd have something that would immediately cure her ailment. Whether this was a specific cure for kidney conditions or something more general isn't really explained in the script or novelisation where it's just described as a "...


13

To transport the whales the crew used transparent aluminium for their makeshift holding tank which they had to "invent" themselves and produce using 1985 technology which wouldn't have existed in 900 AD.


12

The crew spent less than 48 hours in 1986. Arrived near dawn, went to Cetecean Institute that same morning then Kirk had dinner with Dr. Gillian Taylor that same day. During dinner Gillian says the whales will be transported tomorrow noon during a press event. Voyage Home (the scene with the two garbage men near dawn) The onshore breeze came up. It blew ...


12

For completeness, I do have a copy of the novel Probe mentioned by N_Soong in a comment. What it has to say is fairly little, but consistent with the STIV novelization. From the prologue: In the waters of hundreds of worlds it had found primitives who held the promise that, in another million years, they might be able to Speak, might become capable of ...


11

It seems likely that what he gave her was a more general treatment for organ failure. Perhaps medical science had made some progress in kickstarting the body's general healing abilities using stem cell therapy. If you could induce the production of certain stem cells, it's possible that the damaged tissues could be repaired. We only have a small glimpse of ...


11

I'm not completely familiar with the "time sling-shot" maneuver, but there are multiple possible reasons for that. Going further back is dangerous It might be that ~1980 is roughly the earliest year they can safely travel. Traveling any further back might strain the Bird of Prey (also dubbed "rust bucket") too much and you all might die. Any further into ...


10

According to TNG: New Ground, several prominent Earth species went extinct in the 21st and 22nd Century Draco Lizards KYLE: The eating habits of Gilvos are very similar to those of Earth's Draco lizards, which died out over three hundred years ago... White Rhinos KYLE: ... as the value of their horns increased, the number of white Rhinos in the wild ...


10

Spock, master of spin Spock put a convincing "spin" on his plan when he explained it to Kirk, playing down the margin of error. Just as Scotty learned to pad his estimates when Kirk was likely to make unreasonable demands, Spock knew that Kirk had trouble relying on logic for making dispassionate decisions in scary situations. Based on the Star Trek IV ...


10

I worked with Nilo Rodis Jamiro on this sequence. We edited the film images created by ILM and worked them them into a sequence with disolves that was used to develop the the film optical FX. There was no discussion of the significance, only the artistic flow of the images. In my mind it is a visual poem that still plays well 35 years later as I watch the ...


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