36

Yes James Mangold, who is the Writer and Director of the movie Logan as well as the Director of The Wolverine, confirms on Twitter that he did intend that as foreshadowing the whole time!! Twitter user "MauriceTheChosenOne" questions James Mangold about this very setup: To which Mangold replies: Well done Maurice And later announces: And here's an ...


26

Nagasaki was about to be hit with an atomic bomb. Hiroshima had been devastated by a similar bomb just three days earlier. Watching the bomb fall, they knew there was no escape and that they were about to die. But they viewed themselves as samurai, and adhered to the Code of Bushido. Under the bushidō ideal, if a samurai failed to uphold his honor he ...


18

This is a failure of canon and writing regarding the issue of indestructible metals. Marvel has made little effort to describe Adamantium in any given detail and it defies the rules that most metals use regarding taking damage or being destroyed. TLDR Given the premise that the Silver Samurai was supposedly capable of generating a tachyon field (read that ...


17

There's no mention of this fear of flying in the comics, the film scripts, the film's novelisations or the various graphic novelisations. As far as Wolverine's evident fear of flying is concerned, it seems that that was purely an invention of the actor Hugh Jackman. The 45-year-old Hollywood star admits he even incorporated a fear into his X-Men ...


15

The Silver Samurai's sword was made of adamantium. It had a heating mechanism built in. Super-heated adamantium can cut through adamantium. This was established as canon on the previous Wolverine movie where Deadpool uses heat vision on Wolverine's claws and then Wolverine decapitates Deadpool, whose body was laced with adamantium. This was confirmed by ...


14

Why shouldn't he? His brain, if we were to hazard a guess, is as capable as any other human and given his regenerative capabilities, his memories should be perhaps a bit more durable than most humans. We are lead to believe his mutant power will allow him to repair any damage done to his body, this would include the very difficult to replace brain cells, ...


13

I would not make the assumption that they have created the alternate timelines that you are implying they have. Quotes from Wikipedia For the movie X2 Sentinels and the Danger Room were set to appear before being deleted because of budget concerns. And Days X-Men: Days of Future Past is a 2014 superhero film, based on the fictional X-Men ...


12

The previous answers have got it right, but I thought I'd add some details (just for fun.) I majored in Japanese history in college, and I wrote my senior thesis on front line battles in the Asia/Pacific theater of WWII. So forgive me if I'm long winded, I just like my details... It is true that there were soldiers in the Japanese military who held to the ...


12

Per this answer: Claws are extended through a silicon plug located in each knuckle cover by surgically-rearranged muscles. Silicon seals must be periodically replaced. It's not a great answer, and there are some pretty clear differences between the claws on the trading card, and the claws as they appear in the movie, but its the best answer you're ...


10

This is left ambiguous in the movie. It could relate to the Phoenix storyline where she appears briefly at different times until she is reborn.


10

This is basically a "It looks cool in the move so lets do it." thing. Based on everything in the comics, Adamantium once hardened is pretty much indestructible, even by something made of adamantium or similarly invincible metal (Uru (Thor's Hammer), Adamantite (Hercule's Mace)) They did a test in the Avengers where Thor, one of the physically strongest ...


10

Because this takes place after the events of X-Men 3: The Last Stand and makes references to those events, it can be assumed that it is within the original three X-Men movies in terms of canon. To understand the turmoil Wolverine is experiencing in the movie, you might want to see X-Men, X2, and X-Men: The Last Stand. The movie that will tie X-Men: First ...


10

In the movie, his power does appear to prevent aging. In fact, it seems to be a pretty central theme to the movie. Yashida explicitly states that what he is offering Logan is an end to his "eternal" existence" "I can end your eternity. Make you mortal." He's quite clear that he's offering to allow Logan to grow old, and die of a "normal" death. ...


10

Idea: under normal conditions, he’ll have a bit of blood around a gunshot wound whilst the healing factor does its work. It doesn’t prevent him from ever bleeding, it just prevents him from bleeding for long. However, in the movies, we never see any blood when he pops his claws, not even the first time he did it as a child (if I remember correctly from X-...


8

It actually does make sense. Growing and Aging are not exactly the same thing. We do not yet know what actually causes biological aging. There are many different theories in that regard. But Aging in a biological sense is basically that the body can no longer regenerate it's cells properly. Our maintenance can no longer keep up with the wear and tear on our ...


8

Largely assuming that The Wolverine is in the same continuity/timeline as X-Men 1-3 Despite wanting to generally keep a low profile, Wolverine was not a complete secret to the public. He popped his adamantium-covered claws in front of humans in multiple instances - including during a very public battle in San Francisco. Regardless of whether or not The ...


6

This dates back to the samurai. It is known as Seppuku or Harakiri. The samurai used to do it because they preferred to die with honor rather than get captured by the enemy. Seppuku (切腹?, "stomach-cutting") is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. Seppuku was originally reserved only for samurai. Part of the samurai bushido honour code, ...


5

Off-screen reasons You're right to question that this part was not answered in any way; except that we are to assume he was caught during his time in the war, and placed in the P.O.W camp - off-screen. These situations are often left ambiguous so that the writers don't have to explain something that seems unlikely when you really think about it: How on ...


4

Adamantium was said that once it was set it could not be re melted so if the sword is red hot then it will not be softened resulting in heated adamantium striking cool adamantium, if this is true then the heated adamantium would crack the cooled adamantium much like a glass cup warm from the dishwasher and pouring cold water in, it would shatter, only in ...


3

If damage to his heart means his regenerative abilities are stunted, it means one of two things: either the factor originates in his heart, or his blood carries the factor and the heart is necessary to pump it around the body. The latter makes more sense. After all, even if the factor did originate in his heart, how would it get to all the other organs? ...


3

Mirroring events in our own universe, Logan is trapped in Nagasaki (in 'Wolverine') in 1945 whereas the events of 'X-Men : Origins' are supposed to have taken place in the late 1970s, leading up to the 1979 "Three Mile Island" incident. This obviously explains why he doesn't have adamantium claws in the earlier part of the Wolverine film. There's a quite ...


3

X-Men Origins: Wolverine takes place over the course of over 100 years. In the movies, James Howlett (Wolverine) and his brother Victor (not brothers in the comic) are shown as having been born prior to the American Civil War (1861-1865), as they both participate in it. They fight in other wars over time. While they are shown in the montage together, this ...


3

I read somewhere that the Silver Samurai could not cut through Wolverine's claws... His(Silver Samurai) mutant ability allows him to generate a field of tachyonic energy around his katana that allows it to cut through almost any material on earth except for adamantium. http://www.comicvine.com/silver-samurai/4005-3174/ (Powers and Abilities section


3

While the film is in canon with the others, it is not necessary to have seen the other movies to understand almost all aspects of the movie, becuse they only share a couple of characters. I saw it with someone who had no experience with the X-men franchise and the only thing that they found unclear was the post-credits stinger because it involves characters ...


3

If you look closely during the scene with Magneto and Xavier, you can see in this clip that his claws no longer have adamantium on them (in case the timestamp doesn't work, the relevant portion starts at 0:39): So, his healing factor allowed him to regenerate the bone of his claws, but the adamantium needs to be re-applied (the rest of his skeleton still ...


2

The blades make small wounds (very thin) so I think these wounds would heal very quickly (a fraction of a second). Therefore, there would simply be no time for the wounds to bleed.


2

Repeated references to nightmares in the film, Logan was dreaming of his love for Jean.


2

According to Bryan Singer, Magneto was involved. To quote directly from the same question on Movies & TV, which quotes ScreenRant, which, in turn, quotes Empire (emphasis and crop mine): . . . Singer hinted at a possible explanation: Director Bryan Singer explains that Magneto’s ability to manipulate metal might have something to do with it. The Master ...


1

He was a prisoner of war; how else do you get into a POW camp, locked in a cell or a well as the case may be. Likely the well is the camp's version of solitary confinement for high value or high risk prisoners.


1

As far as I am concerned, the timeline of the original trilogy and future Days of the Future Past are the same. The Trask assasination probably wasen't as public as it was in the altered timeline, which to me is enough to justify the negative but not openly violent status regarding mutants in the original movies. Just imagine them developing the advanced ...


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