25

When you know that there is a God, you do not need a religion to worship Him. And it is known that Ilúvatar exists, since there is living people (well, elves) that has seen the Valar, and even talked to them.


18

As I recall, the only thing resembling a prayer in LOTR is when Faramir shouts, "May the Valar turn him aside!" in relation to the Mumak (giant elephant). Assuming that Faramir expected his men to know what he was talking about, the average resident of Gondor would know who the Valar were. (Edit: Not actually Faramir's line, see comment below.) It appears ...


15

It was intended to be a real place on a planet in the Klingon Empire, and would have been discovered in an undeveloped storyline in DS9. The Klingon belief system involves an afterlife consisting of two zones: Sto-vo-kor, where the honoured dead are welcomed by Kahless himself and rewarded with an endless battle against formidable enemies. The other zone ...


9

I found this answer by googling religion and middle Earth.. From: Lord Of The Rings Wikia (Religion). Religion in Middle-earth is generally divided into two mutually exclusive factions: The worship of Melkor and the Worship of Eru Ilúvatar. Ilúvatarism- The worship of Eru Ilúvatar is the religion of the Good Peoples of Middle-earth. The ...


7

This is especially strange in a world where there are still living witnesses, like Galadriel, to the actions of the Valar and other "divine" beings, and where there are still Maiar wandering around talking to people and putting on flashy firework shows. Maybe this is already the key to your question? Religion in the sense we know it does not work ...


5

There are a few other examples of religions in Middle-earth. The Dwarves may worship Aulë as their primary deity: For they say that Aulë the Maker, whom they call Mahal, cares for them, and gathers them to Mandos in halls set apart The Blue Wizards may have founded new religions in Middle Earth: I suspect they were founders or beginners of secret ...


3

I think I may have a not-so-speculative answer. According to wikipedia article you've cited chernobog is a deity "...about whom much has been speculated but little can be said definitively." Since little is known about him, that gives writers the freedom to make him into anything they want. Tolkien did this in his fiction. He would take an obscure Anglo-...


3

A note on the theological knowledge of Hobbits. The Prologue, 1 Concerning Hobbits, to The Fellowship of the Ring states that by the time of the War of the Ring the Hobbits in the Shire were very used to peace and prosperity. They forgot or ignored what little they had ever known about the Guardians, and of the labours of those that made possible the ...


2

Really interesting discussion with everyone bringing in good points. And particularly thanks to Jimmy Shelter for his deep knowledge and insights of Tolkien history. For myself, I also think that maybe Tolkien decided at one point in his writing career on putting anything religious that ressembled his own beliefs aside because they had changed many times ...


1

The line "I have not put in, or have cut out" implies the possibility of mentions or allusions to "everyday knowledge of the Valar/Eru Iluvatar" in earlier versions of his writings, which may possibly be found in "The History of Middle-earth".


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