23

At 80% of the speed of light, the time dilation is only 5:3 - one second on the ship is equal to 1.67 outside. To get a ratio of 'hours' (7071:1, not quite two hours per second), you need to be going 0.99999999c. To get a ratio of 'days' (223606:1, not quite three days per second), you need to be going 0.99999999999c. That speed is 6 miles per year slower ...


17

Warp drive seems to defy the general theory of Relativity, in more than one way. Specifically, it seems that the relativistic effects that would normally cause a person to change at a different rate than the outside world seem to not affect anything. The only thing that would cause relativistic effects is the impulse drive. I found a forum on StarTrek.com ...


15

If one tried to view a scene from a 'time dilated' location, several problems would arise. First there's the 'red shift' phenomenon, which would push the visible light of the location far into the infrared for the viewer, in this example. Next, there would be distortion in objects and reflected light that would seriously alter the appearance of the viewed ...


12

TL;DR: (UPDATED MAJORLY!!!) Out of universe, Card explicitly admitted to "the details and the timeline are not exactly right" in Ender's Game Chapter 15. In universe, most likely reason is simply that people talking about the flight to Shakespeare were rounding things down from 52 to 50. A second plausible in-universe explanation was that both Ender and ...


11

Chapter 17 of The Science of Interstellar by physicist Kip Thorne (who was a consultant on the movie, and co-wrote the original script treatment) discusses Miller's planet and its orbit around Gargantua (the supermassive black hole seen in the movie, said in the book to have a mass about 100 million times greater than the Sun), and says: Einstein's laws ...


11

The planet was within the gravitional forces of the black hole. The planet itself only had 30% more gravity than Earth. So the black hole caused the extreme time dilation they suffered while traveling there and on the surface. During the movie there was an image, which isn't available yet, but it was essentially: This image is not to scale. The closer you ...


10

Only five years, Earth time. According to Memory Alpha, the Enterprise, under James T. Kirk, was on a five year mission from 2265 to 2270. In other words, due to warp speed and such, there is no issue with time dilation and the five years on the ship was the same as five years on Earth. Exactly five years passed. Also, if time dilation is an issue, ...


10

This is Inverted World by Christopher Priest. As chance would have it, we're discussing this book at our next SciFi reading group meeting. I first read the book as a 14 year old and I really loved it. I heartily recommend it to 14 year olds of all ages!


8

As suggested in the comments there is a David Brin short story, The River of Time aka Coexistence, that is similar to this. However it has some key differences. Specifically the main protagonist is a male science fiction writer called Daniel Brand, not a girl, there is no overpopulation theme and aliens are not mentioned. The first sign of the change is ...


8

No. The relative dilation experienced at half light speed would be around 14%. Even if we assume the ship is referring to their remaining journey time in Earth Standard Time (which, for the record it isn't, but let's say it is anyway for fun) that means that their remaining 88 years would be reduced to, at most, 74 years. Given that Aurora is in good ...


7

If an object is in free fall around a gravitating body, it feels no locally-measurable gravitational effects from that body aside from tidal forces (time dilation is not locally measurable, it can only be defined relative to distant clocks), and tidal forces are not significant on a human body near the event horizon of such a large black hole (see my answer ...


7

Stanley Schmidt May The Best Man Win - short story in Analog March 1971. They want to ignore the technicality and nominate him regardless. But he points out that if time dilation is ignored, not only can he run, but his nine year old daughter can vote for him as she was born before they left Earth decades ago.


6

Could be "The Center of Time" from "Einstein's Dreams" by Alan Lightman. There is a place where time stands still. Raindrops hang motionless in air. [...] As a traveler approaches this place from any direction, he moves more and more slowly. His heartbeats grow farther apart, his breathing slackens, his temperature drops, his thoughts diminish, ...


5

The 61,000 time dilation factor on Milner's planet is not due to relative velocity time dilation, but gravitational time dilation. Additionally, it is not due to the gravity on the planet itself, but the massive gravitational well of Gargantua (the supermassive spinning black hole). The gravity affecting Cooper on Milner's planet (from the 100 million ...


5

It's neither, it's a scientific error. No planet could have strong enough gravity to cause time dilation of that magnitude, as the linked article says, and no planet could survive if it was close enough to a black hole to produce that time dilation -- it would be torn apart by tidal forces.


5

It's not time dilation.


5

The inside of the black hole is pretty clearly a loop in time, so he could come out of it in literally any point in time.


5

I believe it is Starfarers, by Poul Anderson. I might have to get this off the shelf and read it again tonight.


4

Shorter answer: The only objective notion of traveling into the past in general relativity is traveling into one's own past light cone, and if you travel into a black hole, your past light cone does not encompass the the entire infinite future history of the outside universe until you cross a particular boundary inside the black hole which The Science of ...


4

In a word? No. Star Trek never denies Relativity, and the resulting time dilation effects, but it never really deals with them. Even ships traveling at impulse (and hence, sub-light speeds) are never seen to have to deal with relativistic effects. The five series and ten movies are incredibly inconsistent in their use of impulse power fractions and the ...


4

Five years. What other years would a human-crewed ship be talking about? Stardates were only used in the original series so that they didn't have to pin down a reallife year that it took place in. Stardates don't have a concept of "year", although some later interpretations used the thousands digit as "year". EDIT Okay, thanks for the downvote. To ...


4

There are many forms of space-drive that are discussed in the real world as well as science-fiction that do not approach the speeds that time-dilation becomes an issue. Many authors have used drives that are either have very low acceleration and/or that drift for a majority of their journey. One example is a light-sail drive - where the acceleration would ...


3

There are several drive types in various games and shows that avoid dilation by not actually generating velocity. The 2300AD game's stutterwarp involves macro-scale quantum tunneling effect to generate both high sublight through several hundred C. Star Trek makes use of "Heisenberg Compensators" that negate dilation effects at both high sub-C and at warp. ...


3

Shorter answer: Jerry Schirmer's answer is incorrect--Cooper did not actually travel into his own past when he returned to our solar system, Nolan had specifically designed the rules of time travel so that only gravitational signals could travel back in time, not people. The only objective notion of traveling into the past in general relativity is traveling ...


3

You're confusing the physics here. The operational concern for the surface gravity is the mass of the planet itself. The operational concern for the time dilation is the mass of the black hole. The huge physical force in play for the black hole would be the character of the orbit of the planet around the black hole - probably a very short orbital period.


2

The answer is frame dragging. When an object with mass spins it tends to rotate (and therefor deform) space. The effect on earth is slight but noticeable with atomic clocks. The deformation of space is what leads to a Lorentz time dilation. Since the Endurance was further from the black hole it would experience less frame dragging than the crew who ...


1

Because Tesseract If I'm reading the question correctly, the core is why Cooper isn't effected by the black hole's gravitational time dilation for his time saving the Earth. However, all the time Coop spends saving Earth occurs not within the black hole itself, but in The Tesseract created for him by the future descendants of Plan B. Within the confines ...


1

Looks like there is already an answer here. The planet is travelling about 50% the speed of light in orbit around the black hole. As at how fast they would need to go to leave the planet and return to the mother ship, it is 82% of the speed of light, shown here.


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