New answers tagged

8

Possibly TimeRiders or another book in the TimeRiders series by Alex Scarrow? The series follows three children, Liam O'Connor (an Irish steward saved from the Titanic in 1912), Maddy Carter (saved from a terrorist attack on an aeroplane in 2010) and Sal Vikram (saved from a collapsing building in Mumbai 2026). The three are recruited into an agency set up ...


11

"Plane and kids being taken from the past" immediately makes me think of The Missing, a novel series by Margaret Peterson Haddix, the first book of which (Found) was published in 2008. From Wikipedia: A thirteen-year-old boy named Jonah had always known that he was adopted and had never thought much of it until he began receiving strange letters sent to ...


30

That is almost certainly Andre Norton's Galactic Derelict which matches your description point for point. Here is probably the cover you remember: Here's an image search with a whole set of covers. And here's the Wikipedia page on the book.


5

Something in your description is reminiscent of a story by Gregory Kern (a pseudonym of E.C. Tubb), titled Galaxy of the Lost, published in 1973: this short novel includes an automated spaceport of a dead race that has been abandoned but no time travel that I remember, just (perhaps) another dimension. The cover of a later edition also might fit your ...


-1

Hoverconversion circuits. As in computer circuits. Unavailable even in 1955. Time travel circuits may be repairable in 1955 (hence the primitive vacuum tubes patched together by 1955 doc when the DeLorean jumps in the drive-in parking lot and brings them to the old west) but antigravity circuits would have taken technology that harnesses the fourth ...


5

Like Eike Pierstorff says in a comment, this matches the seventh voyage from The Star Diaries (Dzienniki gwiazdowe) by Stanisław Lem. In that story, Ijon Tichy is stranded with his spaceship in a time vortex, and ends up together with several copies of himself. The story is humorous, Ijon both gets in fights with his past and future self and has to ...


0

When information travels through time, paradoxes are likely to arise. At least in scenarios where no different timelines are created. In the case of 24, a time traveler does not travel physically but brings knowledge of the future (his present) to the past. From there, it is possible for a time traveler to go to the past and become rich by betting on ...


-1

Yes, what you describe makes lot of sense, and it may or not lead to paradox depending on the context. As a rule of thumb, but keep in mind I may be wrong, time travel doesn't exist: it's a made up thing invented by humans being to tell stories. So whatever rules the writers came up with are perfectly fine and working in the context of the story which is ...


1

As Jeeped said in the comments, this doesn't actually sound like a fourth distinct kind of time travel: it sounds like a variant of the second kind that you list. Based on your description, "going back in time" in 24 could be explained as entering a new timeline at a point that looks like a past point in your own timeline. Nothing in the new timeline is ...


2

The rules you have described do appear to lead to paradoxes. If you travel into your past, there are two obvious problems. One is that, presumably, you can do things differently this time around, and that means changing the past—which requires a parallel worlds interpretation in order to make sense. Secondly, if the watch moves from where it was in the ...


9

I think you're looking for Michael Crichton's Timeline In Corazon, Dan Baker and his wife are lost and driving through the Northern Arizona desert when they come across a man in his seventies with very little hair on his head but a sizeable beard. He looks like a priest. They pull over to help him, then take him to a hospital in Gallup, New Mexico. They ...


Top 50 recent answers are included