109

The Ringwraiths couldn't fly on their own or teleport. To get from point A (near Rivendell) to point B (Mordor) they had to travel every foot in between. In LotR, they walk, ride horseback and ride flying mounts. With their horses gone, their only option was to get new transport or walk back to Mordor -- a very long way! 'You cannot destroy Ringwraiths ...


90

It's mentioned in his authorised biography that Tolkien had a personal liking of mushrooms, stretching as far back as his idyllic childhood days in Hall Green, Birmingham, the very same memories that supposedly inspired his writings about the Shire. According to his younger brother Hilary Tolkien, his recollection is that a particularly loathsome farmer (...


40

I think that the passage that best explains the apparently contradictory versions of Galadriel's status in the Third Age is given in the chapter The History of Galadriel and Celeborn in Unfinished Tales. Pride still moved her when, at the end of the Elder Days after the final overthrow of Morgoth, she refused the pardon of the Valar for all who had fought ...


16

Initially, the Balrog held onto Gandalf to keep the latter from escaping. However, as the wizard got the upper hand, the monster fled, up a single long stair. Then Gandalf managed to keep them together, either by holding onto the Balrog's heel or (if he was speaking metaphorically) by following closely after it, as it climbed and climbed: From The Two ...


16

So why do the people assembled at Rivendell seem to think that just because the Nine have lost their mounts, the threat is somehow temporarily over? They know the flood couldn't have killed or hurt the Nazgul. They know that they have no physical form to begin with that might have been hurt in the flooding. So what gives? "What gives" is the Bruinen flow ...


13

The Houses of Healing does seem to be an intentionally placed transition chapter, as suggested by this particular blog writer. This chapter is a cooldown from the previous one, designed to act as the first part of a transition to the final climactic moment of Book Five. Three key characters have been left terribly wounded by their efforts to save Gondor ...


9

It's Gorbag's suggestion to Shagrat at the high pass above Minas Morgul. They have just taken the unconscious Frodo prisoner and Sam hears them though he and they are in different tunnels. "...But anyway, if it does go well, there should be a lot more room. What d'you say? - if we get a chance, you and me'll slip off and set up somewhere on our own with a ...


8

Geologist here. Answers by Matt Thrower and Ash are to the point: The material mined out of Moria had to go somewhere, and if the dwarves disposed of it in the usual way, there would be extensive cones of tailings flanking the mountains. Over the course of thousands of years, the tailings would develop soil and be covered with forest. They would not easily ...


8

They are not consistent There is no definitive version of Tolkien's word on Middle-Earth. They were written, revised, scrapped, re-started, re-revised, scrapped again, restarted and so on over many years. The Silmarillion itself was started three times after the publication of the Lord of the Rings and never reached a state in which he was willing to submit ...


6

Elves in LOTR are really different of what you might found in other genre like Dungeons and Dragons where there are smaller frail humans with longevity and better archery skills. They are the first comers, they were meant to be superior beings. They are taller, stronger, near immortal, fairer and generaly a lot more poised than other beings. They are not ...


6

Tolkien provides the following description of the boundaries of Gondor following Hyarmendacil's victory over the Men of Harad in TA 1050. The might of Hyarmendacil no enemy dared to contest during the remainder of his long reign. He was king for one hundred and thirty-four years, the longest reign but one of all the Line of Anárion. In his day Gondor ...


6

In the books he isn't a giant eye but has a spirit form and a physical form, even in the Third Age. But Sauron also was thrown down, and with the hilt-shard of Narsil Isildur cut the Ruling Ring from the hand of Sauron and took it for his own. Then Sauron was for that time vanquished, and he forsook his body, and his spirit fled far away and hid in waste ...


3

Remember how Galdriel corrects Sam when he speaks of elvish magic. I don't think that either Tolkien or the elves would think of Sam's words as "magic", as in say these words and this will happen. Sam is saying a prayer to Elbereth (Varda) one of the two most powerful guardians living on Arda (the world). The words are in What does Sam shout when he uses ...


3

It is likely that Sauron's purpose in creating the Ruling Ring was indeed complete dominion over the Elves through their rings, but by the time of LOTR the Ring means something very different to Sauron and the Free Peoples. In addition to controlling the other Rings, The Ruling Ring focuses and multiplies the willpower of its master. Armies will flock to ...


2

It's a recurring pattern in Tolkien's works that fast-pace, action-filled chapters are followed by calmer ones in safety, as if to give the reader (and maybe the author too?) some breathing room. It's simply his writing style. Some other examples: The Hobbit - after being chased by orcs and rescued by the eagles, the party is given some respite when ...


2

I think that @Lexible's answer is nearly right, but needs expansion. (I won't go into detail on the parts that IMO don't need expansion.) First, as noted in one of the comments, Pippin was still in the Palantir trance (or mentally reeling from having encountered Sauron) and does not carry out Sauron's orders exactly, saying a bit more than Sauron ...


1

I don't know about why. That question could probably be asked about anything in the story, and the answer would most of the time be "just because". But you are right, it definitely was part of the world lore and was put there consciously. A quote from The Fellowship of the Ring: Hobbits have a passion for mushrooms, surpassing even the greediest likings ...


1

Sauron's wording is deliberately ambiguous Sauron's words (as repeated by Pippin) are “Wait a moment! We shall meet again soon. Tell Saruman that this dainty is not for him. I will send for it at once. Do you understand? Say just that!” The Lord of the Rings Book Three, Chapter 11: The Palantír Page 593 (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; Single Volume ...


1

In all honesty around maybe 170 - 250 years he could have lived. By Aragorn's time even most pure of Gondorians and Arnorians (Dúnedain) lived around 100 - 110 years, greatly dimished from their time in Númenor (420 - 250 years). They only man to surppas the 420 years was Elros Minyatur, First King of Númenor and no other. He lived to the super old age of ...


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