100

With the understanding that Bombadil was clearly depicted as the oldest being in Middle Earth (He tells the Hobbits this in their encounter with him ... "Tom was here before the river and the trees"(FoTR)) Gandalf was one of the Maiar, which were spirits created before Middle Earth took the shape it was in when the elves first awoke (Olórin he was called ...


66

Tolkien addressed this in Letter 144: I might put it this way. The story is cast in terms of a good side, and a bad side, beauty against ruthless ugliness, tyranny against kingship, moderated freedom with consent against compulsion that has long lost any object save mere power, and so on; but both sides in some degree, conservative or destructive, want a ...


66

Tolkien felt that Bombadil represented an important concept in the story, but that he was essentially useless in defeating evil as represented by Sauron. Here you have it from the horse's mouth. I'm not sure if this is sufficient to address your issue, but it's the only mention of pacifism in a Bombadil context in Tolkien's Letters. Tom Bombadil is not ...


65

No, Tom could not have defeated Sauron. As Gandalf mentioned, Tom could not use the Ring's power - rather the Ring did not affect him. 'It seems that he has a power even over the Ring.' 'No, I should not put it so,' said Gandalf. `Say rather that the Ring has no power over him. He is his own master. But he cannot alter the Ring itself, nor break its ...


56

Tolkien probably disagreed with pure pacifism Judging the views of an author from their work is always a risky proposition. That said, I think this passage captures something of Tolkien’s views on war: I am in too great doubt to rule. To prepare or to let be? To prepare for war, which is yet only guessed: train craftsmen and tillers in the midst of ...


55

Yavanna had created the trees and Melkor was destroying them. So to help Yavanna, Iluvatar sent spirits with which to ensoul certain trees to serve as protectors of the others: these creatures were the Ents. Treebeard was the oldest of the Ents, and so the firstborn of all sentient or perhaps animate things on Arda, or as Gandalf loosely says, 'living ...


51

Time, pacing, and narrative focus Quoting from a 2000-ish interview with Ain't it Cool News1: "Also, will you be including Tom Bombadil? The Ralph Bakshi production cut it out, as did the BBC radio drama.” PJ: At this point in time Bombadil is out. The main reason is not just time or pace, but one of simple narrative focus ... the Bombadil sequence ...


36

In the Fellowship of the Ring Tom describes himself as: Eldest, that’s what I am. Mark my words, my friends: Tom was here before the river and the trees; Tom remembers the first raindrop and the first acorn. He made paths before the Big People, and saw the little People arriving. He was here before the Kings and the graves and the Barrow-wights. When the ...


32

More than you might think, though most of them are video games only tangentially related to The Lord of the Rings novels. In no particular order: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, a 2002 video game not based on the film The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-Earth II, a 2006 video game The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-...


31

I find it revealing to look at Letter 153, one of the few pieces of Tolkien's writing on Bombadil that you haven't quoted (emphasis mine): I don't think Tom needs philosophizing about, and is not improved by it. But many have found him an odd or indeed discordant ingredient. In historical fact I put him in because I had already 'invented' him ...


23

This is a very interesting question. In the end, I do not think that Tom is intentionally arming the Hobbits against the Witch King. From Tolkien's letters #144 (shamelessly stolen from this under-appreciated answer) But if you have, as it were taken 'a vow of poverty', renounced control, and take your delight in things for themselves without reference ...


20

The little information we have about Tom Bombadil suggests that no, he was unaffected by the addictive aspect of the Ring. Gandalf, who is usually right about things, suggests that Bombadil is immune to its effect: [I]f he were given the Ring, he would soon forget it, or most likely throw it away. Such things have no hold on his mind. He would be a most ...


17

The thing to remember is that no one is 100% sure of what Tom Bombadil actually is- the only thing we know is that he is very, very old. The top answer for this question ( Who or what was Tom Bombadil? ) suggests he might be a deity. If you're a god, it seems to me that you can get anywhere you want, whenever you want.


15

From Wikpedia about Tom Bombadil: Treebeard calls himself the eldest living being of Middle-earth and says that he was there before anyone else. However, Tolkien remarked in another context: "Treebeard is a character in my story, not me; and though he has a great memory and some earthy wisdom, he is not one of the Wise, and there is quite a lot he does ...


14

Tolkien did not intend to express any personal opinion about anything, and discouraged the reader from attempting to decipher his views based on interpretation of L.O.T.R. Here is a quote from Tolkien's foreword to Fellowship: "The Lord of the Rings has been read by many people since it finally appeared in print; and I should like to say something here ...


12

No, Tom Bombadil doesn't seem to be affected by the Ring at all; if he was affected, it was to a vanishingly small degree. Here is the passage in which Bombadil and the Ring come face to face: Indeed so much did Tom know, and so cunning was his questioning, that Frodo found himself telling him more about Bilbo and his own hopes and fears than he had ...


10

If this is a question of who is more powerful it is an unanswerable one. The origins and powers of Tom Bombadil are far too ambiguous to be matched up against Sauron with a declared victor. If this is a question of whether or not Tom ever would the answer is simple: no. Tom is uninterested in the affairs of the ring or the world outside the Old Forest. He ...


9

And even in a mythical Age there must be some enigmas, as there always are. Tom Bombadil is one (intentionally). -Letter 144 That said, I think we can show what Bombadil is not. Tom is not a man, hobbit, elf, or dwarf ...or any other sort of "normal" creature. The ring had no effect on him. Tom is not a Maia Gandalf was also a Maia but he was ...


9

Tolkien doesn't specify For what it's worth, Christopher Tolkien seems to believe the names were chosen by Bombadil, based on this note from The Return of the Shadow (emphasis mine): Tom Bombadil's names for the ponies go back to the beginning, with the exception of 'Sharp-ears', who was first called 'Four-foot'! History of Middle-earth VI The ...


8

Looks like you are tring to read more into it than there is. The Hobbits are being pursed by the Nazgul, one of the few weapons able to hurt them is a blade of Westernesse or Elvish forging so it made perfect sense for Tom to give them the weapons he did, also keep in mind they never expected to fight anyone, and had no weapons at all to begin with. In ...


8

None of the other answers mention this, but I feel it's important to note that Tom Bombadil was originally a Dutch doll belonging to one of Tolkien's children, Michael. One day Michael threw it in the toilet, but it was rescued and it became the protagonist of a story fragment Tolkien invented for his children. He later wrote a poem about him called ‘The ...


8

It strikes me as a surprise that Oldest and Fatherless: The Terrible Secret of Tom Bombadil, one of the more interesting fan theories about Bombadil -- written by a certain livejournal user, km_515 -- isn't mentioned here yet. So, here it goes. All in all, this obviously unofficial theory says Bombadil is an ancient, almost timeless evil rivaling Sauron &...


8

There are some assumptions you're making. First, there is no real proof that Sauron will simply win if he gets the One Ring. Yes, all of his opponents believe this to be true... but of course they do! Sauron had the Ring in the past and was defeated: from an objective point of view there is no reason to believe that he would actually conquer the entire ...


8

According to an unsourced interview found on Yahoo! Answers: Originally Bombadil was going to be in the movie, but had to be cut out. Peter Jackson actually explained this on a televised interview not long after the release of the Fellowship of the Ring. I can't for the life of me find a transcript, but I can summarize. Interviewer: Were ...


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