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12

Technically he could be called one Defining Lich as: In fantasy fiction, a lich (/ˈlɪtʃ/;1 sometimes spelled liche, cognate to Dutch lijk and German Leiche, both meaning "corpse") is a type of undead creature. Often such a creature is the result of a transformation, as a powerful magician or king striving for eternal life uses spells or rituals to bind ...


11

I believe you are looking for "Disturb Not My Slumbering Fair", a 1978 macabre tale by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. I first encountered it in the Asimov collection, Young Monsters, but it's appeared in several collections: You can find a summary here, at a review of Cautionary Tales: This story is original to the anthology, and the following author’s note draws ...


11

It may be down to: Imhotep, a real Egyptian chancellor/high priest, popularized as a mummy in Boris Karloff's The Mummy [1932] and the more recent The Mummy [1999] and The Mummy Returns [2001]- both with Brendan Fraser, or: Kharis, a fictional character, who was featured by Lon Chaney in The Mummy's Tomb [1942], The Mummy's Ghost [1944], and The Mummy's ...


11

It seems to be a mixture of black magic and body transference From The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, we see Joeseph Curwen was almost certainly a necromancer: In many cases, diarists have recorded with some awe, Curwen shewed almost the power of a wizard in unearthing family secrets for questionable use. During the final five years of his life it seemed ...


9

"Lich" is a very old word meaning "body" or "corpse". It originates from Middle English sometime before 900 AD: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lich It is no longer in normal English usage, but survives as part of compound words such as lich-gate, meaning the entrance to a churchyard. As you may have noticed, HP Lovecraft was fond of obscure old ...


8

This is an old question, but it's gotten bumped, so I am sharing some old research that I was a part of about twenty-five years ago. There are not (to my knowledge) any archives of the bulletin board where this was discussed, but I remember the rough conclusions that we came to. We were coming to the question from the point of view of Dungeons & ...


8

People of a certain aesthetic sort: (successful dreamers) can continue in the dreamlands [The Quest for Unknown Kadath] even after their bodies are dead on Earth. The dreamlands seem to be an aspect of the total human unconsciousness stretching back to prehistory (which is why Lomar etc are both in the dreamlands as still existing countries and long ...


8

If by "novelization" you mean the original novel, in Matheson's story vampirism is caused by a bacterium that is sensitive to UV light, so direct sunlight kills the bacterium, which had animated the host body, causing rapid decomposition (and staking works because it introduces air into the body, which switches the bacterias metabolism from ...


7

I searched Google's Ngrams and Google books for "living impaired." There are sporadic hits in the corpus of scanned books for those two words in succession. However, prior to the 1980s, none of these were actually the expression in question. There were few enough hits that I could check them all, and they came from phrases like, "... having their standard ...


7

No corpses so far. Wights in the books are described as having pale flesh, pale blue eyes, black hands. They greatly differ from classic Romero type zombies. A headless wight or wight's severed arm still poses a threat. So there are no other way to kill the wight, except the fire. ADWD, chapter 13, Bran. This chapter is a good source, it has all the answers ...


6

As a commenter has noted, it's a broad question, but I think it can be answered directly if we stick to a few key parts: the definition of a zombie and the requirements for an example. Definition: a zombie must have died and come back to life Qualified example: a qualified example must be from a publication of some sort with a moderate or greater audience ...


6

Zombie Digestion: To put it bluntly, zombie digestion doesn't exist. Zombies are, after all, dead. They are compelled to bite any animal that moves, including humans, and given the chance, they will "eat" flesh, but it doesn't actually benefit them in any way. This is a pretty consistent rule across the slow zombie spectrum; it is left unsaid in ...


6

Quite possibly one of the most trustworthy resources here would be Max Brooks. His explanation of the motivation for eating humans follows: source (em. mine): Motivation Why do the undead prey upon the living? If it has been proven that human flesh serves no nutritional purpose, why does their instinct drive them to murder? The truth eludes us. ...


6

The only actual use of the word "lich" in the literature associated with Lovecraft is in August Derleth's (under a pseudonym) "The Extra Passenger." The usage there indicated a reanimated corpse, more intelligent than a zombie, but a corpse all the same. Derleth indicated the supernatural appearance of the corpse to the activity of a demon transporting it ...


5

At least in film, the first "modern" zombies, the literal dead walking again (as opposed to voodoo and other drug and / or hypnotic states) appear a couple years before Night of the Living Dead. A Hammer film from 1966, Plague of the Zombies, was the first film to show corpses rising out of their graves, digging through the earth, to walk again. While ...


5

Honestly, Dracula by Bram Stoker (1897) seems to be the earliest work I've found where the vampires are warded off by a cross. Varney, one of the predecessors to Dracula, was specifically noted to not be bothered by them. There's probably folklore associated with apotropaic wardings of vampires, but I have not found them yet. As a side note, it does not ...


4

If you ignore the rare ancient myth or two, there are two main kinds of werewolf: Werewolves are occult in origin from the medieval years onward to the 19th century where the Werewolf is a beast of supernatural origin having either been a person who sold their soul or had a magic spell or curse cast on them. Not undead, but occult and definitely bestial ...


4

The transcript only refers to them as skeletons. The Pirates of the Caribbean wiki refers to them as "Cursed." If neither of these suit you, then I would say simply "the undead" would be the best term, based on what Barbosa says: We are not among the living and so we cannot die...but neither are we dead! We have all the desires of the living, but cannot ...


4

The Walking Dead borrows heavily from the (mass outbreak) zombie genre. In very few other movies or stories have animals ever been able to become zombified. Though they may come up with their own particular explanation for why this is so, I contend that they have it so only because no other stories have ever done it. And the reasons for that are interesting....


3

Edit: This answer was written on rpg.SE from where it got moved here. :) I know this Q might soon be migrated off-site (and not for a bad reason.) Before it goes, though, let me offer an elusive answer for your consideration: A lich of/in the Cthulhu Mythos works as you, the Keeper wants it to work. Make up your ritual, make up your own version of the ...


3

To a larger extent, Cthulhu Mythos with regard to subjects like this falls into the "up to the writer" category. For example, August Derleth tended to have a much more theist slant to his work than Lovecraft himself. Here's what I mean by up to the author. If you're writing a kind of lightweight mythos book that is more high fantasy than cosmic horror, you ...


2

In no way are they zombies mostly because zombies are not intelligent nor do they fear light. We see intelligence when they stalk towards nevilles house and attack him there. Even he said that they could follow him. Also they are bright enough to know how to hunt and know how to defend themselves. They are not quite vampires either. For one they do not drink ...


2

Arkhan the Black is a Liche in the Warhammer Fantasy universe. So he would talk how all other Liches are able to talk, which would be magic!


2

There is no afterlife at all defined in the Mythos as H.P. Lovecraft defined them on his writtings. As it's been stated before, he was a pragmatic materialist and atheist, he didn't believe in any type of religion or afterlife, even joked often about them on their letters. But the main theme connecting almost every aspect of his work is that known as "...


1

As of yet we only know of 5 sure fire(pun intended) ways to kill a wight: Fire: Burning them will kill them, first seen in Season 1 Episode 8, "The Pointy End", when one attacks Lord Commander Mormont. Dragonglass: Stabbing them with Dragonglass seems to do the trick, this is pointed(pun intended) out by Jon to Cersei and ...


1

Joseph Curwen's technique was to reduce living things to a "bluish-grey dust", and later resuscitate them. From how I understand it, this second part is simply a reversal of the first, so the subject is just as "alive" after as they were before. Curwen did not actually die in the fire, but performed the spell on himself while it was ...


1

The idea of the modern zombie, i.e. a horde of reanimated half-rotten corpses that try to eat the living and (sometimes) convert their victims to new zombies, usually accompanied by the collapse of civilization as a setting, is sometimes acknowledged to have been invented by George Romero in his movie Night of the Living Dead. From Wikipedia (emphasis mine):...


1

It could be as simple as how animals carry diseases but aren't affected (Swine/bird flu, malaria, etc.), but once a human is infected they get the symptoms of the disease. Since the DNA and number of chromosomes varies for every species, it can change the way it affects all of them. Humans might have a certain chromosome that can be affected by the disease, ...


1

In the movie, they are classed as darkseekers. Their own breed of monster. In the book, they are classed as vampire-like creatures as they are based off of vampires, but they don't follow the classic scheme. Also they can't be zombies as the book I Am Legend gave rise to the zombie anyways.


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