36

From the TNG Technical Manual; Matter conversion subsystem creates physical props using replicators. Replicated props are generally created when an object is likely to be touched by the participant. Some props are animated under computer control by precision-guided tractor beams. Holographic imagery subsystem creates three-dimensional images ...


29

The 13th Floor (second take on Daniel Galouye's novel "Simulacron-3" after the german movie "Welt am Draht"). However there is no time travel involved.


24

This is "Spectator Sport," by John D. MacDonald, originally published in the Feb 1950 issue of Thrilling Wonder Stories, and the original from this magazine can be read online in its entirety courtesy of archive.org. There is an (unaccepted) answer for a previous question with appropriate citations to show matching details. As mostly copied from that answer:...


17

With an omni-directional treadmill! They can already do that today!


13

This sounds like "Love is a Download", an episode of the HBO series Spicy City- except in the virtual world the fat guy was a heavyweight champ and the girl was a geisha (some would argue big steps from the respective regular guy and dancer). The shark-guy was the woman's abusive boyfriend outside the VR world.


10

If PMar returns, they are welcome to any or all of this answer since they found the title. This looks to be Otherland, a four volume series by Tad Williams. The story opens with Paul Jonas, a British infantryman in an apparent part of the Western Front of World War I. Wounded, he has a vivid dream in which he meets a "bird-woman", and after he wakes up, ...


10

Ready Player One (2011) by Ernest Cline In the year 2045, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he's jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade's devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world's digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator's obsession with the pop ...


10

The book I was remembering was titled The Game by Terry Schott! It's a pretty good book that covers the story of Zack the main character as he plays a virtual reality game in which people can earn credits (money) for when they are back in the real world. I'll post the official summary of the story below! What if life as we know it was just a game? What if ...


9

I hadn't heard of this story before, but was intrigued by your question so I searched around a little and found that this question has been answered elsewhere. It appears to be "Catacomb" by Henry Melton from issue #97 of Dragon magazine May 1985.


9

This is John Macdonald's 1950 short story "Spectator Sport". Dr. Rufus Maddon arrives in the future, but no one cares, they think he is crazy. Everyone lives for the VR TV and the society is falling apart. Maddon gets a lobotomy and stuck in the VR machine. It ends "Rufus Maddon wiped the sweat from his forehead on the back of a lean hard brown hero's hand....


9

Sounds like The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest. The show was originally aired from 1996 to 1997. The paralyzed man, called Jeremiah Surd, is the main antagonist in several episodes and and the virtual world is called Questworld. A continuation of the Jonny Quest (1964)and The New Adventures of Jonny Quest (1986) series, it features teenage adventurers ...


8

Sounds like a scene from Tad Williams' Otherland. ...a rather lengthy book... Book 1 is around 800 pages. ...a bunch of people in virtual worlds... "...widespread availability of full-immersion virtual reality installations, which allow people from all walks of life to access an online world..."* ...set in the future. "The story is set on Earth ...


8

Lems The Futurological Congress has chemically induced "realities" to cover up poverty/government failures (even if they turn out to be a dream-within-a-dream / hallucination-inside-a-hallucation thing). The (quite short) book is from 1971 (as am I, so I'm reluctant to say that it's "very old", but it still seems a good match).


7

I think I found it! The Gadget Factor by Sandy Landsman From the book's description: Two college freshmen create the ultimate computer game, a universe built to their own specifications, but complications arise when their formulas for time travel also work in the real world. The match isn't exact. The two main characters, Worm and Mike, work on the ...


7

It's called "The Last Ghost" by Stephen Goldin. It was a 1972 nominee for a Nebula award.


7

Demons Don't Dream, by Piers Anthony Teenager sucked into a video game (using the "calibrate your eyes" technique) where trying to subvert censorship has penalising consequences, and he picks an irrationally buxom NPC to accompany him. The novel is part of the Xanth series, and was released alongside an actual computer game set in that world.


7

It's Lady El, by Jim Starlin and Daina Graziunas. First published June, 1992. From the GoodReads site: A poor woman killed in subway accident is given a second chance at "life" when her brain is harvested by a government operation in an attempt to link human minds with computers.


7

I think you are thinking of The Metamorphosis of Prime Intellect, a novella by Roger Williams. A computer of omnipotent power that is (theoretically) benevolent to humans controls the physical universe as though it were a virtual simulation. Humans can't be hurt, but some get bored. They exploit a loophole in the computer's logic and create self-...


7

Minority Report This scene, where a man in a commercial VR establishment fantasizes himself being congratulated by a group of people while feigning humbleness.


6

I suspect this isn't the book you're thinking of because it's a series of four books, but the Otherland tetralogy by Tad Williams is along these lines. A consortium of multimillionaires called the Grail Brotherhood have created VR worlds that they plan to live in.


6

Could it be the Twilight Zone episode 'Dreams for Sale'? The main character is a woman and she is having a picnic with her dream family (from what I remember) and then at the end she wakes up and she's in a machine and she has only been in there for a few minutes.


6

It predates computers, but the earliest technological (non-magical and non-philosophical) example I've found is ''Pygmalion's Spectacles'' by Stanley G. Weinbaum from 1935. Here is an excerpt where the protagonist, Dan, tries out the inventor's device: "Here it is!" he gloated. "My liquid positive, the story. Hard photography—infernally hard, therefore ...


6

Pirate Islands A freak accident sends three Australian kids into a computer-generated world of pirates and swashbuckling heroes. The kids must help a group of adventurers find a buried treasure and a way back to the real world. Kate, Sarah and Nicholas are the three siblings. More details, especially about the tree house: The pirates arrive and ...


6

1930: "The City of the Living Dead" by Laurence Manning and Fletcher Pratt; originally published in Science Wonder Stories, May 1930 (available at the Internet Archive, click here for download options), reprinted in Startling Stories, July 1940, in Avon Fantasy Reader, No. 2, 1947 (also at the Internet Archive, click here for download options), and in The ...


6

This might be Realtime Interrupt by J. P. Hogan, published in 1995. https://sfbook.com/realtime-interrupt.htm As a brilliant scientist at a leading computer corporation, Joe Corrigan heads an ambitious project, dubbed Oz, to create a virtual reality system capable of mimicking reality in every detail. When he later awakens in a psychiatric ward ...


6

After some searching, a friend of mine found the video. You can watch it below.


5

It might be Dorothy Heydt's A Point of Honor which was published in 1998. I don't remember the quote you do, but some other points match up. Here's the beginning of the description from Amazon: Sir Mary de Courey is the doughtiest knight in the virtual reality land of Chivalry. But when, in the real world, her plane crashes and her car is driven off ...


5

The script explicitly states that when "Doug" finally arrives at the highest level he's in 2024, as demonstrated by the futuristic 'welcome to the world of tomorrow' type buildings he sees off in the distance. INT: 2024 DOUGLAS : Where am I? JANE : Come, I'll show you. That said, the only way an instantaneous transfer of personality could ...


5

I think you mean "Donnerjack" by Roger Zelazny & Jane Lindskold. The titular character is a famous virtual world creator who accepts a commission from Death in return for bringing his dead lover back to life. In addition to the building he was to give up their firstborn, which eventually drives him into a sort of paranoid state. IIRC, the commission ...


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