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58

Brandon and gnovice have made some good points, and I just want to add that: If a single-engine plane loses that engine for just a minute or two, it's going down. This isn't the same situation with vessels like submarines and cars, which generally only have a single power supply. The Los Angeles class attack subs only have a single nuclear reactor, though ...


58

This is discussed in the Star Trek TNG Technical Manual (considered a canon source of info about the Star Trek universe). In short, different engine configurations have been tried in the past but for ships over a certain size, a twin-warp-nacelle design seems to be the easiest way to achieve a well balanced warp field as well as offering the best ...


56

More or less he made it up. There's a couple of things to back this up Star Trek does everything in the metric system. Of course, that would confuse Earhart, because a good portion of the world converted long after 1937 (the UK didn't formally start until 1965 and the US has not switched). So Tom is probably picking a number and then slapping a MPH onto it, ...


50

In Voyager "Threshold", Tom Paris achieves Warp 10: "infinite velocity" From the episode (see also here and here): KIM: In principle, if you were ever to reach warp ten, you'd be travelling at infinite velocity. NEELIX: Infinite velocity. Got it. So that means very fast. PARIS: It means that you would occupy every point in the universe ...


48

Technically the first race to discover warp drive would be the ancient race in The Chase in Star Trek: The Next Generation. This is the species that moved out into the galaxy, explored it, and found it empty, so they seeded planets with DNA (which also explains why there are so many humanoid races in the galaxy). But if you're talking races that are ...


44

On the Memory Alpha page for All Good Things, this is mentioned - bolding mine: It is clear that there is no more warp 5 limit in the future. This limit was set in "Force of Nature". In addition, ships in the future timeline are able to go above Warp 13. This would appear to contradict "Threshold", where it is stated that Warp 10 is the theoretical limit. ...


40

Just as a photon torpedo is able to maintain warp flight using a warp sustainer engine (even though it has no warp core itself), so too should a ship be able to sustain a warp field on auxiliary power for some time after a warp core is no longer present/active. Here is the relevant excerpt from the photon torpedo entry on Memory Alpha, taken from the Star ...


38

If it weren't a copyright issue, I'd just scan this guide and upload this somewhere. This is from the Star Trek: The Next Generation Writer's Technical Manual Forth Season Edition, which was sent to me by Lolita Fatjo (Script Supervisor) when they were preparing me for pitching to them. This is the guide sent to all writers to define what is "true" in the ...


38

Quoting from the Star Trek TNG Technical Manual (Considered a canon source of information about the Trek universe), we have the following "author's note" from series Writer and Producer Rick Berman "Figuring out how "fast" various warp speeds are was pretty complicated, but not just from a "scientific" viewpoint. First, we had to satisfy the general ...


33

I've never heard it explained in-universe, but there is one thing wrong with the reasoning in your first sentence: extra engines generally aren't added to aircraft solely for redundancy, they're added due to increased power demands. If you need to haul more people/freight/weaponry, add another engine(s). Single-engine aircraft are still very common if you ...


29

That's actually a surprisingly hard question to answer. Assuming we use the standard logarithmic scale offered in the TNG Technical Manual, then you're looking at Warp 9.5 being approximately 1800-2000 times the speed of light. In 123 days, assuming no malfunction and unlimited fuel, you could therefore travel 606 light years: This tallies quite nicely with ...


28

Likely a plotting error... First of all, the black curve that we see is mostly given by the following formula: the warp factor w is related to the velocity v by w=(v/c)^(3/10), where c is the speed of light. However, Michael Okuda (co-author of the TNG Technical Manual ) altered the relation after warp 9. Here is an email from Okuda, in which he ...


26

You can't even compare the two. Hyperdrives allow you to travel around the galaxy in a matter of days whereas warp drives take decades, requiring numerous refueling operations along the way. However, the disparity between the two technologies stems more from the style of the two franchises than anything else: Star Wars is an action saga, and people needed ...


25

In the Star Trek : Voyager episode 'Day of Honor' (the same episode referenced in the linked question), Chief Engineer Torres is forced to "dump the core" because of a surge in tachyon levels. You can see the before and after pictures below; Where the warpcore itself is concerned, you can see a complete core in the picture below My sincere apologies for ...


23

I think you're overestimating the size of particles that were deflected by the deflector dish. At high impulse, even a grain of dust could pose a serious threat, but a whole asteroid could never be deflected. So, you're right that the deflector dish is for pushing stuff aside, but the kinds of things it's pushing aside are so small as to be totally ...


21

Trivial, really: The Federation is simply not in the business of Kamikaze suicide runs. And since we haven't seen an entire space-ship piloted per remote in a very reliable manner (not even shuttles), that's exactly what it would have to be. If they dispatch a fleet of 39 ships to apprehend the Borg, they might not be surprised of casualties, but having a ...


17

It depends on precisely how warp works. The closest thing we have to a realistic theoretical model of it is an Alcubierre Drive. With an Alcubierre drive, you'd be pulled towards the forward axis of travel by the forward contraction of spacetime, and also pushed along the axis by the rear-ward expansion of spacetime. So the inertial forces are null, or more ...


17

The Vulcans already had warp drive. Cochrane invented the first drive that is used by humans. This is explained in Star Trek: Enterprise, where they mention that Vulcans have had warp drive for many years before they came across Earth. I will look into a particular episode for more details. According to Memory Alpha, the Vulcan's achieved warp sometime ...


17

Wormholes in the Trek universe allow for transit to any linked point in the galaxy instantly. In fact, the linked point might actually be at a previous time as well (which I think makes any "velocity" calculation you might try to perform involve either a negative result or an imaginary number, depending on how you look at it). There was a relatively stable ...


16

In short, warping inside a solar system is generally considered a last-ditch maneuver. It's certainly possible (and does occur in a number of episodes) but at the very least it seems to be highly inadvisable, presumably due to the large number of potential hazards such as interstellar objects and strong gravitational fields: DAX : We're too far. ...


15

A "Warp Core" is just the label given to the matter-antimatter reactor on most starships. A starship can technically be warp-capable without a warp core so long as it has some other energy source to power the warp coils, which are the mechanisms which actually generate the warp bubble and allow the ship to travel at warp speeds. So a simple in-universe ...


14

Yes, escape pods are capable of warp. This was established in the Next Generation episode Angel One (Memory Alpha). From Memory Alpha: Escape pods, also known as rescue pods, of the Odin were capable of traveling at warp 1 for extended periods. It took them 5 months and 14 days to reach the nearest inhabited planet Angel I in 2357. (TNG: "Angel One")


13

I don't remember that scene in detail, so I'm not sure if there are specifics in the movie that would alter what I'm about to write (until I go back and watch it again), but here's my thought: it didn't matter that the Enterprise was in the ergosphere specifically. What was giving the ship trouble was simply that it was really close to a black hole. The ...


13

From Wiki: Warp drive is a faster-than-light (FTL) propulsion system in the setting of many science fiction works, most notably Star Trek. A spacecraft equipped with a warp drive may travel at velocities greater than that of light by many orders of magnitude, while circumventing the relativistic problem of time dilation. However, Wikia contradicts that ...


13

Imposed Speed Limit Well, it was established that certain areas of space are negatively affected by warp drives, and so a speed limit of warp 5 was imposed except in extreme circumstances. What happened to warp drives destroying the universe? Fuel Economy Just like a car, there is a cost to running at higher warp. The warp drive doesn't create energy ...


13

Warp 5 (125 times the speed of light) was a major goal because it was considered the minimum speed at which interstellar travel was practical. Keep in mind that even at light speed it takes years to travel between stars. Even at higher speeds such as warp 4 (64 times light speed), real interstellar travel was not considered practical on a timescale of days ...


13

A Repulsor Beam Perhaps not the fastest, but a VERY fast form of propulsion was that used by the Aldeans. They managed to transport the Enterprise-D 3 days away at warp 9 almost instantaneously: RADUE [on viewscreen]: Captain, we want you to understand the nature of your choice. A small demonstration of our power. (Something whizzes around the planet ...


12

Warp drives in Star Trek are a fictional version of the real-world physics concept of the Alcubierre drive. From the Wikipedia article: ...Alcubierre proposed a way of changing the geometry of space by creating a wave which would cause the fabric of space ahead of a spacecraft to contract and the space behind it to expand. The ship would then ride this ...


12

There is also an episode of Voyager where Janeway asks Tom to pull back at least half a lightyear away at maximum warp (I believe it was the asteroid they were looking into the S01E09: Eminations). He pulls back to a stated 0.6 lightyears and it takes about ten seconds. I think that someone just didn't do their math.


11

Using previous behaviors as a reference, warp drive is not done near the atmospheres of planets except under extreme duress, both due to the density of particulate matter (the atmosphere itself) and the gravity well of the planet disrupting a stable warp field. Under Impulse Propulsion We have seen starships, using their deflector array block atmosphere-...


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