201

Yes The roots of this joke are very old, and it has been attached to a variety of clowns since its inception. As noted here: That's a famous story, sometimes told as a joke, often related as fact. It's really your archetypal "sad clown" story, and indeed exactly the same tale has been told of other clowns, most notably the Swiss clown Grock (...


58

There's no reason Dr. Manhattan could not have cured Janey's cancer. For all intents and purposes, he has the powers of Molecule Man, a villain so powerful that only his psychiatrist can beat him. Dr. Manhattan is nigh-omniscient. He can (generally) perceive every instant of time (though it may be limited to things he has/will/is perceive/ed/ing). He ...


58

As the comic states, the material is "heat and pressure sensitive", and this is what determines the black and white portions. This means that the pattern on the mask will be based on the pressure and heat applied by his face. Faces are, along with the rest of the human body, pretty much symmetrical — so the heat and pressure pattern it produces would be (...


53

Immediately after his transformation to Dr. Manhattan, he continued to do things he would have done as a human. He continued his relationship with Janey, for example, even though he no longer seemed attached to humans, or at least, not in the way that humans are. Similarly, I'm sure he had the idea that when he was a human, if he had had the abilities he had ...


44

Batman is never mentioned by name in the novel, but it is extremely likely that he and all other "famous" comic book characters are comic book characters in-universe, if they exist at all. From the in-universe memoir "Under The Hood", Hollis Mason says the following about his decision to become the first masked hero: For me it all started in 1938, the ...


43

Nope - the cancer was never from Dr. Manhattan; it was all set up by Adrian Veidt, quite intentionally, as a plot to get rid of Dr. Manhattan as too big of a threat to Adrian's plans. And, yes, it was actually in the comic, although it's easy to miss. The Watchmen Wiki has this in the entry on Mars: Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in our Solar ...


37

No, it did not react to his emotional state. While the technology might have existed, and Ozymandias might have been able to make it, Rorschach's mask was actually part of an accident from his career working with a dressmaker. From the Watchman Wiki: Rorschach's mask (which he refers to as his "face") consisted of a specialized fabric, one that ...


37

Rorschach is saying he's not surprised Dr. Manhattan is on Veidt's side, and resigning himself to his fate by keeping to his beliefs. Here's the corresponding scene from the graphic novel: Rorschach is mocking Dr. Manhattan, who is also a utilitarian like Veidt. Veidt cares little about single human lives in the greater picture, but Dr. Manhattan literally ...


36

It's totally wrong to characterise Jon/Manhattan as being without emotion. Although we see him increasingly attempting to divorce himself from his own humanity (presumably to protect himself from the emotional impact of Laurie's affair) the reality is that he spends a considerable amount of time, effort and energy on creating a facade of implacability. When ...


34

The original Nite Owl's feelings about Dr. Manhattan are complicated. Firstly, Nite Owl acknowledges Dr. Manhattan's and Watchmen's superiority when it comes to fighting crime. This is seen in the prequel comic series, Before Watchmen: Minutemen (which is narrated by Hollis Mason), issue 6: And this one is from Alan Moore's Watchmen #4: One could argue ...


33

Rorschach also stated in both the comic book and in the movie that he thought the original Silk Specter (Sally Jupiter) was a bloated whore. Knowing what we know of Rorschach's past, whose own mother was a whore, he probably feels either ambivalent, or he doesn't actually see it as a crime. Remember that Rorschach walked the streets of New York where hookers ...


31

From the interview and quotes from Comic Con's “The Physics of Watchmen — or Why So Blue Dr. Manhattan.” by University of Minnesota physics professor Jim Kakalios who teaches a class called “Everything I Know About Science I Learned from Comic Books.” (He also wrote “The Physics of Superheroes”), he speculates: Could be because of an electromagnetic shock ...


31

It appears that he did not. On page 6 of the first issue of Watchmen, Rorschach appears in his civvies and is carrying his sign when he walks past the two police detectives that just finished looking over the Comedian's apartment. They are discussing masked vigilantes—specifically Rorschach himself—which piques his interest in the crime scene the ...


30

Dr Manhattan doesn't perceive time as coexistent, he EXPERIENCES it as such. There are clues in the syntax Alan Moore uses to articulate Osterman when he is speaking in the first person: notice the tense. No matter where he is, he always expresses himself in the present tense: 'I am watching the stars', 'The Photograph IS in my hand', 'It IS 1985, I am ...


30

The existence of Doctor Manhattan has made the Unites States totally dominant over the other countries of the world. While there are other nuclear powers (principally the Soviet Union) capable of doing huge damage to human civilization through a nuclear strike, the U.S. has had a clearly overpowering position since Doctor Manhattan's intervention in the ...


29

Alan Moore has said that Tales of the Black Freighter as a whole is an analogy of Adrian Veidt's story within Watchmen, but specific aspects of it are references to the other characters and their actions. From an interview with Moore: Q: There are some interesting microcosms in Watchmen, like "the Black Freighter". The protagonist asks "How had I ...


28

It's an easter egg and also confirming that Batman does not exist since the Waynes haven't been murdered (as you see a Watchman prevents the first shot). The movie's whole intro sequence is used to show all those little differences to the real world (and other comic continuities) that established the movie's alternative timeline.


25

Yes, Dr. Manhattan has the potential and perhaps inevitable descent toward entropy all things must ultimately embrace. He will either succumb to natural forces which may erode his abilities or psychological dissolution as he becomes more inhuman over time, thereby destroying the very humanity which allowed him to transcend death and gain his powers in the ...


23

Because he was working for the US military studying nuclear physics; and after the accident, the military marketed him as a government superhero To answer your second question: He slowly lost interest in human affairs; his relationship with the second Silk Spectre demonstrates that... And the Comedian also stated the Dr. was losing his humanity during the ...


22

I don't believe that Dr. Manhattan ever does anything productive with biological systems. Within the movie, you see him blowing up people, but in both the movie and the comics, the only things that he builds or fixes are inorganic objects. It's part of a greater symbolism where, for all of his great powers, he can't do anything to bring about life, merely ...


22

Despite it often being claimed that Rorschach's moral world is seen only in terms of Black and White (His mask being the manifestation of this), it cold actually be observed that he only operates in relative Grays. Remember also, those black and white areas are constantly shifting their boundaries, in endless flux. For what is a fundamentally psychotic ...


22

Ok trying again but this time differently formulated. You haven't missed anything. It is just never addressed in the Watchman universe why the pattern is always symmetrical. The reason it is not addressed is because it does not have to be addressed. The reason why it doesn't have to be addressed is because the characters name is Rorschach named after ...


21

In the comic, the Comedian was in Dallas at the time of the JFK assassination, guarding Richard Nixon, and it is implied that he killed JFK. See the Watchmen Wiki for details. So while it was much more explicit about it, the movie is truer to the original comic.


20

In The Watchmen comic, at his party, The Comedian is telling his "opinion" about the assassination of Watergate journalists Woodward and Bernstein, ending in the following line. "Nah... I'm clean, guys. Just don't ask where I was when I heard about J.F.K." After which everybody around him (some right-wing politicians, I assume) are laughing. So in Alan ...


20

It was disintegrated, same as in the movie. Whether it became Dr. Meowhattan is left unanswered. This is just a speculation, but seeing film Nixon's attitude towards Dr. Manhattan, I would expect him to keep popping new Manhattans from the intrinsic field subtractor. Apparently, becoming Dr. Manhattan requires a certain degree of conscienceness; the kind ...


18

It very much depends on your choice of canon. In the film and comic, his powers are certainly up to the task of interacting with humans on a cellular (or even atomic) level but the reality is that removing the cancer in that way would be prohibitively time-consuming. I have witnessed events so tiny and so fast...they can hardly be said to have occurred at ...


18

The difficult part is probably not the disintegration of the body, but putting the parts back together afterwards. Even if they did try to reproduce the experiment (and there is no indication in the book that they ever did), they would still have to find an applicant that is able to reassemble themselves after disintegration. This does not seem to be an ...


17

The very short answer is that while Adrian may be a genius, he does have the classic supervillain 'Achilles heel' when it comes to his obsession with history. Not only does he model himself on Ozymandias but he puts his plan at severe risk through his choice of names for the various parts of his scheme; Pyramid Deliveries (the shell company he's using to ...


15

In short, the subtractor was Adrian's last-ditch weapon against a being that has almost godlike powers. He's smart enough to have built an open sided Intrinsic Field Subtractor and there's at least a (very) slim chance that it might work and that the fields research that gave John his powers might also have the power to destroy him. When it doesn't work, ...


15

No there weren't. However, Alan Moore revealed to Wired in 2010 that DC had offered him the rights to Watchmen back, if he would agree to prequel and sequel projects: “They offered me the rights to Watchmen back, if I would agree to some dopey prequels and sequels.” [...] “So I just told them that if they said that 10 years ago, when I asked them ...


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