38

Like every other place in the comics world, it's "nowhere in particular"; in fact, what we saw in the movie was likely impossible to put anywhere in the real world. My best guess, though, is somewhere in the Mediterranean, specifically the Aegean Sea -- off the east coast of Greece. In the movie, they are pretty careful to never reveal where the island is, ...


21

You have to pay close attention to the scenes where the Germans are first crossing the barrier, but the fate of the ship is shown on-screen — it sank. Each time the ship appears in the background, you can see that it's tilting to the side a bit more. This starts from the first time we see it on the clear side of the barrier, and by the last (3rd time, I ...


18

According to the DC wiki, the Amazons are immortal beings that were created to teach men the virtues of peace and love. So, at least in terms of the main comic continuity, the Amazons are indeed immortal. In the terms of the movie, we see ample evidence of Amazon immortality as Diana herself is seen in modern day Paris remembering her days in World War One....


15

During the scene with the amazons in which Steve is wrapped in the lasso of truth he states that he's an American assigned to work with British intelligence as a spy. The Native American "chief" also confirms this later when Diana asks the chief about his homeland and who took it away from him, and he nods towards Steve and says his people.


13

Well I mean without going to any form of "official/unofficial" sources, Yes. He was on a plane with a load of gas that would kill him, 17000+ feet up (5000+ metres), without a parachute and either land or water below him, either way from that height they're effectively the same. The explosion from the plane alone looked big enough to decimate him. Followed ...


12

The novelisation of the film indicates that his actions were motivated by a lack of understanding about the plane's capabilities and an excess of caution that the plane might crash near to a populated area, noting that the price for failure was potentially millions of innocent lives. He also seems worried that if he crashes near the ground, that the cloud ...


12

C. The relationship between Wonder Woman and Steve Trevor has had several iterations in the comics, so let's go through your three options. A: he's definitely dead. There is no canon reason to think this. The death of Steve Trevor has never been an "accepted" part of Wonder Woman's story (unlike, say, Spider-Man with the death of Uncle Ben, or Batman ...


12

In the source material, the Gods of Olympus are not aliens, in the strictest sense. They are more like extremely powerful metahumans. Their origin has to do with the creation of something called the Fourth World, and the resulting Godwave. That event carried a massive amount of cosmic energy to Earth, and created metahumans as well as the Gods of Olympus, ...


11

He's talking about the size of his penis. In multiple interviews Pine stressed that "every man knows what he's talking about" and that it was a "dumb man thing"


11

According to the film's official novelisation, as it passed through the barrier, the battle cruiser hit a hidden reef and was holed below the waterline. Beyond, the enormous ship that had brought the Germans had hit the coral reefs. Black, gritty smoke from the sinking battleship swept across the reef and over the beach. It smelled like it had come ...


10

In the movie, there were multiple places where it was claimed that Zeus is actually dead. Both Hippolyta and Ares said (or strongly implied) that. The overall impression given by the movie is that the gods, in general, are gone, leaving mankind to fend for itself. I believe this is actually going to play into the plot of Justice League, based on some ...


10

Whilst not five pointed, there's a prominent star on Diana's inherited head piece. In Babylonian symbolism, the goddess Ishtar is represented by an eight-pointed starburst and she is associated with the planet of Venus. The Romans equated Aphrodite with Venus and, today, some people equate the Greek Goddess Aphrodite with Ishtar. Both goddesses ...


9

Hardly. The DCEU Wonder Woman is a character surrounded by myth, legend and hyperbole. Unable to be killed? Not even close to the truth. Ares is an unreliable narrator. When modern Wonder Woman in Batman v. Superman faced Doomsday, it was clear she was outmatched. Without the intervention of Superman and Batman's Kryptonite spear, alone she would have ...


9

We get a short insight into this in the film's Official Novelisation. He wanted to stick to their original plan, the reason they came. Diana on the other hand wanted to cross No Man's Land to save a French town which had been enslaved. “The woman pointed beyond the trench, into the indeterminate distance. Diana turned to Steve. “We need to help these ...


8

Towards the end of the movie when Diana finally confronts Ares in the recon tower he tells her that she is the daughter of Hippolyta and Zeus. Whether thats 100% true is wishy washy and Hippolyta told her a different story, and her origin from the comics are slightly different as well.


8

There's a few things going on here: First, to be clear, we don't know where the island is, at least in the DCEU, but we can make some pretty good guesses and the Aegean Sea (the eastern-most part of the Mediterranean) is probably right. If you look at the Aegean Sea on a map, it's not really that big relative to say an ocean, but it is full of islands. It'...


8

That item is (probably) a Mother Box. The Mother Boxes were left on Earth and the Humans, the Amazons and the Atlanteans each took one of the Mother Boxes to guard. While the Amazons and the Atlanteans kept them safe, the Humans buried their Mother Box so that no-one could ever find it again. One was used (in the comics) in the creation of Cyborg, ...


7

According to the official novelisation, it was the dawn. Booooooosh! Ares’s final barrage of lightning hit them; they glowed blue and she grimaced against the searing pain. She held the pose, held it, and held it until, like the release of a coiled spring, the full force of the energy, more powerful than all the bombs ever made, shot back into ...


7

It's just coincidental. The villain in Wonder Woman is based directly off the same character in the source comics, Doctor Maru (a.k.a. Doctor Poison). In the comics, she was introduced in 1942, originally as a Nazi spy named Princess Maru, who used a face mask to hide her Japanese ethnicity. Later, her granddaughter also took the alias Doctor Poison and ...


6

We had already seen WonderWoman was impervious to the gas. She is nearly as powerful as SuperMan. So the perfect outcome would be for him to grab two parachutes, and bring WW with him. Take off, and then tell WW to grab the stick while he jumped off with the parachute. WonderWoman could survive the explosion, gas and fall. There are reasons this plan ...


6

The film isn't much help. All we're told is that he's Captain Steve Trevor… Pilot… American Expeditionary Force. and that he's working on secondment for British Intelligence. This doesn't actually confirm his nationality, merely who he's working for. Luckily, the omniscient narrator in the film's novelisation is kind enough to give us proof of his ...


6

The black and white photo used for BvS and Wonder Woman (WW) prologue is probably the same. The colour version and the scene in the WW movie was however recreated. This was confirmed in several interviews where the set had to be recreated 5 months after, to match the photo setting. It meant that when we eventually got around to shooting the scene that the ...


6

First and foremost, Themyscira is designed to be hidden from Ares. It's almost the sole purpose of the place. If he had known where it was he could have done something about it long ago. Ares own description of how he has been working is that of 'whispering in selective ears' - in other words he hasn't been using grand supernatural powers to create the war, ...


5

She hasn't died in the movies yet, so we cannot make claims about what can kill her there. In comic continuity she has died to a variety of opponents, including one of Darkseid's family (Steppenwolf). Trying to reenact Baldur's birthday festivities by having people hit her with weapons while she just sits there probably wouldn't go very well for her, though....


5

He considers himself above average as an example of his sex, i.e. in "manly" qualities: strength, masculine physique, courage, etc. But he's mostly talking about attractiveness (which is a composite of these and other factors). He probably also thinks that Diana is just asking about his penis, but she's asking about him in general. (If you watch her eyes, it'...


5

According to the film's official novelisation, excited by having seen the warriors practicing earlier, young Diana simply misjudged the distance to the walkway below. Wily Mnemosyme caught sight of her and Diana coursed down another walkway, maybe a little too fast, and then she launched herself toward another path below. She imagined herself soaring ...


5

Steve asks Chief "Is it flammable, Chief?" and Chief answers in the affirmative. "Yeah, she said it's hydrogen. It's flammable" So they BURN it when they blow up the warehouse.


4

We know very little specifically about World War II, and Hitler, in the DCEU, for the simple reason that no events have taken place in that time period during the films. With no evidence that there is any difference in the events of WWII, it is reasonable to assume that there are no substantive differences. Hitler rose to power with the assistance of ...


4

It's pretty simple: during the battle, the Amazons were attacking the people who were shooting at them. Steve wasn't shooting at them. Ergo, the Amazons didn't attack Steve.


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