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78

In that episode, Picard clearly acknowledges that what Worf did was legal under Klingon law. PICARD: Mister Worf, your service aboard the Enterprise has been exemplary. Until now. WORF: Sir, I have acted within the boundaries of Klingon law and tradition. PICARD: The High Council would seem to agree. They consider the matter closed. I don't. Mister Worf, ...


61

One of Worf's primary character aspects is his love of and preference for traditional Klingon culture. He was raised by Humans most of his life, but countless episodes feature him exploring, experimenting with, or advocating Klingon customs. This is often contrasted with other Klingons in the Federation, even his son, who are more willing to blend or even ...


51

Fairly simple: Worf is a respected officer with a spotless record, thus he gets a bit more tolerance in some areas. Ro was court-martialed and had to be sprung out of prison by an admiral, therefore Riker has her toe the line like a first-year cadet. She was out of uniform upon arrival, and got snapped at for it. In reality, Worf was wearing the sash in ...


48

Klingons do appear to possess an odour that some humans and aliens find offensive. In DS9: Trials and Tribble-ations, Darvin (unaware that Worf is Klingon) describes them as: "foul-smelling barbarians" Bashir and O'Brien defend him by reassuring him that he doesn't smell bad: O'BRIEN : Don't take it personally, Worf. BASHIR : I rather like the way ...


44

In short, true Klingons largely go by their first names (x, son of x (of the house of x)). For example, Kurn identifies himself thusly in "TNG: Sins of the Father" I am Kurn, son of Lorgh He's then referred to throughout the episode as "Commander Kurn" (or just "Kurn") rather than as Mr Lorgh. Starfleet and the crew of the Enterprise make a special ...


42

In some circles, the use of contractions is considered too informal and dare I say, sloppy English. Worf, being a bit of a stuffed shirt would gravitate to the more 'formal' English speech patterns. Also, the more formal sounds a bit more forceful and aggressive. Note the proclamation, "I will stop you!" as opposed to the more plaintive, "I'll stop you!" ...


37

In the DS9 episode "Let He Who Is Without Sin..." Worf finished a sentence Dax started about him being afraid of losing control, saying "someone I care about might get hurt", a pretty clear acknowledgement that he was indeed afraid of this. From the transcript: WORF: When I was thirteen, I was captain of my school soccer team. We had made the ...


34

According to the Memory Alpha article on Starfleet Uniform Code, it is explained that there seem to be some inconsistencies regarding Bajoran earings. Although, as the OP points out, Worf was able to wear his baldric, this may have been because it denotes the symbol of a Klingon's house, according to this article, which is highly significant to a Klingon. ...


33

You've mistaken "Operations" (those responsible for the conduct and good running of a ship or station) with "Strategic Operations" (those responsible for managing the disposition of fleets, ships and defence stuff). Although the names are superficially similar, one is a Command role and the other is not. The original screenplay from "Way of the Warrior" ...


31

This is TNG: The Emissary. Note that he's talking about people rather than humans. K'EHLEYR: Worf, you're the perfect Klingon. The ultimate minimalist. Talk to me. WORF: I've noted that some people use humour as a shield. They talk much, yet say little. transcript


31

There's a few things going on here; The position of First Officer is at the gift of the captain and doesn't necessarily go to either the next highest ranking person on the ship, nor the person who current holds the next chain-of-command rank down (hence why Data was passed over in TNG: Best of Both Worlds, Part II). This means that Data can choose whoever ...


27

He was not a junior security officer before Tasha's death The simple answer is that he was not part of the security crew before Yar died. From his career summary on the official Star Trek web site: Starfleet Career Summary 2364 : As lieutenant j.g. in command division, assigned to U.S.S. Enterprise as relief conn and tactical officer under Capt. Jean-Luc ...


27

I believe it's the third option you listed -- that the Starfleet uniform is a child's uniform. The logic is that from the Klingon point of view the ideals of Starfleet and the Federation are childish. If Duras does not call it a "child's uniform" when worn by other Starfleet officers, it's because he doesn't have any expectations that they would be real ...


26

Because she hadn't obtained permission yet. At the end of that very same episode, she asks Picard for permission to continue wearing her earring, and he grants it. Since Worf is already wearing his baldric when we first see him, it's reasonable to assume that he has already asked for and been given an exemption that allows him to wear it.


21

No he's not. It's clear from the original script that he quit his job and returned to Starfleet. BEVERLY : I'm so glad you made it back to the Enterprise before I left. WORF : I was not suited for the life of a... diplomat. BEVERLY : (wry) Who'd have guessed? These lines were cut from the film, leading to the confusion over his status. The ...


21

They aren't named in-universe or outside. The skull-headed monster appears in 4 episodes within the trek universe, each time in a "Klingon Training Program". Evidently they're "Alien Warriors"..."from Klingon Mythology". DS9 Way of the Warrior : "Worf is wielding a Klingon saber, fighting a hulking ogre-like monster from Klingon mythology." TNG ...


21

The In-Universe Answer The Crystalline Entity feeds on life - the energy of life, and its matter. A dead klingon feeds no crystals. The Real Reason Michael Dorn is in the opening credits.


21

Because Gowron can read the room better than Duras. Duras mainly inherited his station in life from his father Ja'rod; the House of Duras is a strong one and considered very mainstream in Klingon politics. On the other hand, Gowron was a relative outsider; Worf knew little of him, except that he'd often disagreed with the High Council. For a political ...


20

Though I don't think there's an ironclad proof one way or another (unless it comes from one of the books), I think the evidence suggests it is naturally curly but that he has it straightened. We know from Schisms that Worf makes regular trips to the barbershop, at least while serving on the Enterprise. While only the length of his hair is addressed in the ...


19

TL;DR: O'Brien's visible rank in "Family" is a continuity error, but he is assumed to have been wearing the proper rank insignia despite what we see on-screen. Your confusion is understandable. Up to (and including) TNG S04E02 "Family", O'Brien was often seen wearing two solid pips on his collar. However, we know this to be the rank of Lieutenant. But O'...


19

The show script offers a pretty good insight into both Worf and Okona's thought process. Okona is a lover and a fighter. He'd like nothing more after a good (ahem) session with a beautiful lady than to have a good punch-up with someone he considers a worthy adversary. Worf recognises that he's spoiling for it, but declines. OKONA: I'm sure it can wait a ...


16

Beyond the obvious Proximity.. One of her previous hosts, Curzon Dax was a negotiator in the Khitomer Accords whose activities result in the Klingon Empire entering an alliance with the United Federation of Planets. During this host 's lifetime she gains appreciation for Klingon rituals and interactions among other things. Jadzia was a skilled warrior with ...


14

Unlike @Morgan's answer, I think this can be merely a "sign of foreignness", not necessarily personality (Spock, Teal'c, Worf); although it is frequently a combination of the two. This happens to be a well-known trope in SciFi, and its originator is in the same Star Trek canon: "Spock Speak" (warning: TVTropes link). Not unique to SciFi either: here's an ...


13

Federation officers do seem to have credit accounts on DS9. Presumably they get a stipend from the UFP's own accounts to help them buy trinkets from the locals when visiting. BASHIR: That better not be from a replicator, Quark. QUARK: Chateau Cleon, twenty three oh three. I already put it on your account. DS9 : The Adversary and WORF: Our wedding plans ...


13

Do the movies count? If so, I think First Contact would be a perfect example for this. Okay, it's against the Borg and Worf isn't technically still part of the crew, yet Picard's first reaction is to assuming command over the remainders of the fleet and immediately transmitting coordinates to fire at - not just for the Enterprise, but for all remaining ships....


13

Five is a considerable number of years to be in a culture - living even one year in another country can profoundly affect a person, and those five years that Worf lived in Klingon culture were the first five years of his life - highly formative years (assuming Klingon maturation is at all like human maturation) Not to mention, he grew much more during those ...


13

Valorum gave me a link. It directly answers the question based on the writers. I'll highlight the relevant points and include the link. Michael Dorn the actor who played Worf stated in an interview, "I thought wiping Kurn's memory was a smart move. You don't want to get rid of Kurn, but he wanted to die. In a way, he was dead already. The show ...


13

All signs point to "no". Mendon was part of the 'Officer Exchange Programme". After the episode ended, he's not heard from again (at least in the main canon of TV shows and films) but it's far more likely that he simply returned to his own ship rather than being killed by Worf and quietly disposed of. You may wish to note that Riker was also off of his ...


12

To piggyback on Robert Columbia's excellent answer, it's important to note that the crime occurred on the Klingon ship, and therefore likely under Klingon jurisdiction: RIKER: Riker to Lieutenant Worf. Computer, locate Lieutenant Worf. COMPUTER: Lieutenant Worf is not aboard the Enterprise. PICARD: Where is he? COMPUTER: Lieutenant Worf transported to the ...


11

Worf never complains of back problems again throughout the course of both TNG and DS9, nor does he have back troubles during the films. In fact, in the DS9 episode Strange Bedfellows, Worf and Ezri Dax are hung upside-down in a cell. Ezri states: "I hate to admit it, but this is doing wonders for my back." Worf, who, as you said, has a history that includes ...


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